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bentley
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Community Room

[ Edited ]
Hi Everyone,

I thought I'd add this thread as a place where we can explore issues outside of the plot of the novel.

My first query involves possibly discussing some of the rituals and beliefs that are secondary to the plot; but are very interesting topics in themselves which may be distracting to the regular discussion threads.

Some of the topics that could be discussed here:

a) Chinese Architecture (Pavillions, Inner Corridors, etc)
b) Reverence for Age
c) Ancestral Tablets
d) The Peony Pavillion Opera production (Lincoln Center)
e) Tang Xianzu
f) Chinese Gardens (from a horticultural and design perspective)
g) Different locations mentioned in China and their respective culinary preferences
h) Geography of locales mentioned in "Peony in Love" and their historical perspective
i) What and who were imperial scholars?
j) Manchus versus Ming loyalties
k) Different political appointments and their respective job responsibilities (ex. What did the Vice Commissioner of Silk do?)
l) What was the Cataclysm and what effect did it have on women in China (Positive/Negative)
m) Amahs
n) Role of Women in China through the dynasties

Or the Community Room could simply be a meeting place to greet and meet old friends and explore ancillary interest areas related to the novel Peony in Love or any other topic of interest.

Regards,

Bentley

Message Edited by bentley on 09-08-2007 12:10 AM
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Wrighty
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]
Wow Bentley, I'm fascinated by your list alone! Do you know the Chinese culture well?
---------------------------
Sorry for the question. I forgot on your intro that you have spent a lot of time in China. I'm still fascinated by you list though. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Wrighty on 09-08-2007 01:09 AM
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bentley
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Re: Community Room

[ Edited ]

Wrighty wrote:
Wow Bentley, I'm fascinated by your list alone! Do you know the Chinese culture well?
---------------------------
Sorry for the question. I forgot on your intro that you have spent a lot of time in China. I'm still fascinated by you list though. :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Wrighty on 09-08-2007 01:09 AM




np Wrighty. I just put out some interesting off-topics that might be worth exploring; I have spent a lot of time in China and loved my experiences; would love to travel some more there. For me, it was like stepping back in time. The major cities are very impressive like Shanghai and even Beijing (which to me was more the core of China); but once you leave the cities and venture out..the experiences are very different...yet unforgettable and enjoyable. China is so vast that the geography and cultural differences from province to province are remarkable; there are so many different culinary styles of cooking in China, for example.

However, what I learned was only the tip of the iceberg and there was so much more to uncover. I really would like to learn from everyone else and just discuss and possibly do some light exchanges and research and sharing on anything that might be ancillary yet help make the book discussion more expansive and culture rich. I am open to any ideas for discussion; just threw out some as a springboard for starters.

And of course this could just be an open area to explore other conversation topics that do not fit as well into the discussion threads and/or might be distracting.

Whatever suits everyone else.

Regards,

Bentley

Message Edited by bentley on 09-08-2007 01:38 AM
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Fozzie
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Re: Ancestor Tablets / Spirit Tablets

I found this information, with pictures, on ancestral tablets:

http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/minigalleries/chinesespirittablets/intro.shtml

You will recall the Peony visited the shrines of her ancestors in her home.

Also, this passage on page 34 mentions ancestral tablets in Peony Pavilion:

"Then, after checking the Register of Marriages, he determined that indeed Liniang had been destined to be with Mengmei, and --- since her ancestor tablet hadn't been dotted --- granted her permission to wander the world as a ghost in search of the husband she'd been fated to marry."

I don't know what it means to dot an ancestor tablet.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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bentley
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Re: Ancestor Tablets / Spirit Tablets



Fozzie wrote:
I found this information, with pictures, on ancestral tablets:

http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/minigalleries/chinesespirittablets/intro.shtml

You will recall the Peony visited the shrines of her ancestors in her home.

Also, this passage on page 34 mentions ancestral tablets in Peony Pavilion:

"Then, after checking the Register of Marriages, he determined that indeed Liniang had been destined to be with Mengmei, and --- since her ancestor tablet hadn't been dotted --- granted her permission to wander the world as a ghost in search of the husband she'd been fated to marry."

I don't know what it means to dot an ancestor tablet.




I found this small write-up. Maybe Lisa can answer this more completely.

http://www.chcp.org/vancestors.html
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LisaSee
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Re: Ancestor Tablets / Spirit Tablets



Fozzie wrote:
I found this information, with pictures, on ancestral tablets:

http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/minigalleries/chinesespirittablets/intro.shtml

You will recall the Peony visited the shrines of her ancestors in her home.

Also, this passage on page 34 mentions ancestral tablets in Peony Pavilion:

"Then, after checking the Register of Marriages, he determined that indeed Liniang had been destined to be with Mengmei, and --- since her ancestor tablet hadn't been dotted --- granted her permission to wander the world as a ghost in search of the husband she'd been fated to marry."

I don't know what it means to dot an ancestor tablet.




I tried to make the dotting of the ancestor tablet as simple as possible, but it's still confusing to a lot of people. There's a written character on the tablet that needs a special dot to be completed. (Think of it like dotting an "i.") If it isn't dotted, then the soul can't properly separate and go to its different places. Most important, that third of the sould that's supposed to reside in the tablet can't go there.
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vivico1
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A father's love circa 1835

I dont know if any of you will be interested in this but I transcribed this today and couldnt help but compare it to Peony and her father or the things she was being taught. I am currently in a project transcribing family letters and documents from the early 1800s to early 1900s for a woman because I have had 10 years experience in reading the handwriting of this period and ways they abbreviate things and talk and just making out individual letters in words too. For example they often made a sign for a double s, as in kindness that actually looks like a p or f and people are often confused by this and Ks may look like Bs and if they can make out the first part of the word, it still looks exactly like Bindnep or worse. Anyway, this letter I am transcribing right now, the man's handwriting is very small and lots of abbreviations and this is a copy of a copy of the original. But I wanted to share this one part of the letter with you from a loving father to his little girl who is preteen and was sent to a Catholic school to be educated in Louisiana in 1835. I get to read a lot of civil war correspondence too which is cool but listen to the love of this father but also in the way he words his advise to her about what she needs to do, how maybe even without knowing it, he puts the burden on here of not only doing well to get along in the world but also to give him much pleasure in her. It is actually a very loving letter and see what you think of his advice to her.


Donaldsville
Louisiana December 20th 1835


My Dear Little Agnes,

You do not know my dear child how often I have thought of you since the melancholy morning we parted from you at Emmitsburg - That I love you dearly you well know and the necessity of leaving you for the first time among strangers was so distressing to me that it has made me sad whenever I have thought of it since. But there was one ting that consol'd me, I knew I was leaving you among those who wo'd be yr kind friends although they were strangers to you and besides that you wo'd among those friends begin yr education upon which depends so much of your respectability and happiness in this world - my dear child, if you act in all things according to my advice I am sure you will soon be, not only high in yr classes but what will give me equal pleasure, you will be a great favorite not only with the whole government of St Joseph's, but with all yr companions likewise - kindness, amiability and benevolence are the most beautiful traits in a young lady of character and where you find these you will be very apt to find all that is valuable besides - I most sincerely hope you have made yrself agreeable to all and to attain this end you ought to remember that many things are necessary - You sh'd at all times be good temper'd and affectionate and kind to every one, and then by being always just and honorable you will do what is most important in making yrself a favorite with all - There is one thing I have notic'd through life and it is this, that a good and kind hearted child at school and an upright and honorable one, is certain to make a good member of society in after-life - now my dear child be obedient in attending to all yr instructions, and then make all love you and I shall then love you myself if possible more than I now do, and most certainly I shall be much prouder of you than I ever co'd be if you were not to do as I wish in this respect.


What an interesting phrase too, " to make a good member of society in after-life", now this could mean her life after the school but also this man is not really fond of religion, he leaves that to the women, and he sends his regards to the Mother Prose of this place and adds a few words of praise for her and rewards for her in heaven, so one wonders if it could also be added to mean "the afterlife" since he knows this could be read by them. lol. I can't wait to see if there are any letters from her as to what her classes are that she will need in life. Are they like those in a girls finishing school and mostly about etiquette? or are there other kinds of classes too? I actually read some of just a few years later from one of the daughters talking about her algebra classes and science and thought it was pretty interesting for the mid 1800s in the south. Anyway, just thought you might find this interesting, if not, its not in the sections that will distract from the book :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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bentley
Posts: 2,509
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Re: A father's love circa 1835



vivico1 wrote:
I dont know if any of you will be interested in this but I transcribed this today and couldnt help but compare it to Peony and her father or the things she was being taught. I am currently in a project transcribing family letters and documents from the early 1800s to early 1900s for a woman because I have had 10 years experience in reading the handwriting of this period and ways they abbreviate things and talk and just making out individual letters in words too. For example they often made a sign for a double s, as in kindness that actually looks like a p or f and people are often confused by this and Ks may look like Bs and if they can make out the first part of the word, it still looks exactly like Bindnep or worse. Anyway, this letter I am transcribing right now, the man's handwriting is very small and lots of abbreviations and this is a copy of a copy of the original. But I wanted to share this one part of the letter with you from a loving father to his little girl who is preteen and was sent to a Catholic school to be educated in Louisiana in 1835. I get to read a lot of civil war correspondence too which is cool but listen to the love of this father but also in the way he words his advise to her about what she needs to do, how maybe even without knowing it, he puts the burden on here of not only doing well to get along in the world but also to give him much pleasure in her. It is actually a very loving letter and see what you think of his advice to her.


Donaldsville
Louisiana December 20th 1835


My Dear Little Agnes,

You do not know my dear child how often I have thought of you since the melancholy morning we parted from you at Emmitsburg - That I love you dearly you well know and the necessity of leaving you for the first time among strangers was so distressing to me that it has made me sad whenever I have thought of it since. But there was one ting that consol'd me, I knew I was leaving you among those who wo'd be yr kind friends although they were strangers to you and besides that you wo'd among those friends begin yr education upon which depends so much of your respectability and happiness in this world - my dear child, if you act in all things according to my advice I am sure you will soon be, not only high in yr classes but what will give me equal pleasure, you will be a great favorite not only with the whole government of St Joseph's, but with all yr companions likewise - kindness, amiability and benevolence are the most beautiful traits in a young lady of character and where you find these you will be very apt to find all that is valuable besides - I most sincerely hope you have made yrself agreeable to all and to attain this end you ought to remember that many things are necessary - You sh'd at all times be good temper'd and affectionate and kind to every one, and then by being always just and honorable you will do what is most important in making yrself a favorite with all - There is one thing I have notic'd through life and it is this, that a good and kind hearted child at school and an upright and honorable one, is certain to make a good member of society in after-life - now my dear child be obedient in attending to all yr instructions, and then make all love you and I shall then love you myself if possible more than I now do, and most certainly I shall be much prouder of you than I ever co'd be if you were not to do as I wish in this respect.


What an interesting phrase too, " to make a good member of society in after-life", now this could mean her life after the school but also this man is not really fond of religion, he leaves that to the women, and he sends his regards to the Mother Prose of this place and adds a few words of praise for her and rewards for her in heaven, so one wonders if it could also be added to mean "the afterlife" since he knows this could be read by them. lol. I can't wait to see if there are any letters from her as to what her classes are that she will need in life. Are they like those in a girls finishing school and mostly about etiquette? or are there other kinds of classes too? I actually read some of just a few years later from one of the daughters talking about her algebra classes and science and thought it was pretty interesting for the mid 1800s in the south. Anyway, just thought you might find this interesting, if not, its not in the sections that will distract from the book :smileywink:




I found the above very interesting for many reasons: very interested in genealogy, interested to see that some things are not different from one culture to another; surprised at the mention of the afterlife, etc. Also the fact that this was written around 1835. Vivico, do you do with work with genealogy for your primary work or is this something you are doing as an aside (hobby, etc)? Letters like the above truly reveal the mores of a specific time.
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bentley
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Re: Footbinding

On Lisa See's site there was a reference to footbinding and the following urls. Very amazing; it may be difficult for some to see. Be forewarned.

http://hvattum.net/index.php/2007/05/19/chinese-foot-binding

An interview, etc. (NPR) Excellent insight.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=8966942&sc=emaf
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vivico1
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Re: A father's love circa 1835


bentley wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
I dont know if any of you will be interested in this but I transcribed this today and couldnt help but compare it to Peony and her father or the things she was being taught. I am currently in a project transcribing family letters and documents from the early 1800s to early 1900s for a woman because I have had 10 years experience in reading the handwriting of this period and ways they abbreviate things and talk and just making out individual letters in words too. For example they often made a sign for a double s, as in kindness that actually looks like a p or f and people are often confused by this and Ks may look like Bs and if they can make out the first part of the word, it still looks exactly like Bindnep or worse. Anyway, this letter I am transcribing right now, the man's handwriting is very small and lots of abbreviations and this is a copy of a copy of the original. But I wanted to share this one part of the letter with you from a loving father to his little girl who is preteen and was sent to a Catholic school to be educated in Louisiana in 1835. I get to read a lot of civil war correspondence too which is cool but listen to the love of this father but also in the way he words his advise to her about what she needs to do, how maybe even without knowing it, he puts the burden on here of not only doing well to get along in the world but also to give him much pleasure in her. It is actually a very loving letter and see what you think of his advice to her.


Donaldsville
Louisiana December 20th 1835


My Dear Little Agnes,

You do not know my dear child how often I have thought of you since the melancholy morning we parted from you at Emmitsburg - That I love you dearly you well know and the necessity of leaving you for the first time among strangers was so distressing to me that it has made me sad whenever I have thought of it since. But there was one ting that consol'd me, I knew I was leaving you among those who wo'd be yr kind friends although they were strangers to you and besides that you wo'd among those friends begin yr education upon which depends so much of your respectability and happiness in this world - my dear child, if you act in all things according to my advice I am sure you will soon be, not only high in yr classes but what will give me equal pleasure, you will be a great favorite not only with the whole government of St Joseph's, but with all yr companions likewise - kindness, amiability and benevolence are the most beautiful traits in a young lady of character and where you find these you will be very apt to find all that is valuable besides - I most sincerely hope you have made yrself agreeable to all and to attain this end you ought to remember that many things are necessary - You sh'd at all times be good temper'd and affectionate and kind to every one, and then by being always just and honorable you will do what is most important in making yrself a favorite with all - There is one thing I have notic'd through life and it is this, that a good and kind hearted child at school and an upright and honorable one, is certain to make a good member of society in after-life - now my dear child be obedient in attending to all yr instructions, and then make all love you and I shall then love you myself if possible more than I now do, and most certainly I shall be much prouder of you than I ever co'd be if you were not to do as I wish in this respect.


What an interesting phrase too, " to make a good member of society in after-life", now this could mean her life after the school but also this man is not really fond of religion, he leaves that to the women, and he sends his regards to the Mother Prose of this place and adds a few words of praise for her and rewards for her in heaven, so one wonders if it could also be added to mean "the afterlife" since he knows this could be read by them. lol. I can't wait to see if there are any letters from her as to what her classes are that she will need in life. Are they like those in a girls finishing school and mostly about etiquette? or are there other kinds of classes too? I actually read some of just a few years later from one of the daughters talking about her algebra classes and science and thought it was pretty interesting for the mid 1800s in the south. Anyway, just thought you might find this interesting, if not, its not in the sections that will distract from the book :smileywink:




I found the above very interesting for many reasons: very interested in genealogy, interested to see that some things are not different from one culture to another; surprised at the mention of the afterlife, etc. Also the fact that this was written around 1835. Vivico, do you do with work with genealogy for your primary work or is this something you are doing as an aside (hobby, etc)? Letters like the above truly reveal the mores of a specific time.


I have volunteered for 10 years transcribing all kinds of vital records, birth, death, marriage, census records, all kinds from copies of the originals and microfiche from all over the world and as far back as early 1700s so that it can be then put onto the genealogical site familysearch.org for anyone to find some of their genealogy for free. I even got to do some Ellis Island records and they were very very hard to do. They also went on that site and also to the City of NY who then built a special Family History site on the Island itself a few years back. I got a Thank you letter of acknowledgment for that. So far our church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has accumulated over 500 million names and dates and made them available to anyone on that site for free. I love doing this and helping people. Well there was this woman who was in one of the Family History research facilities talking about this huge amount of family letters and government letters and things from this period that is just pure treasure to me but she needed help to transcribe them and asked a woman there is she knew anyone. She thought of me. So right now I am helping on that project with her and she pays me for 10 hours a week of doing it and I donate another 10 just to be of service to her, because I think what she is doing is great. She has done some before and turned it into the War Museum of one state and another historical society of another. And thats how I got to this :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: A father's love circa 1835



vivico1 wrote:

bentley wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
I dont know if any of you will be interested in this but I transcribed this today and couldnt help but compare it to Peony and her father or the things she was being taught. I am currently in a project transcribing family letters and documents from the early 1800s to early 1900s for a woman because I have had 10 years experience in reading the handwriting of this period and ways they abbreviate things and talk and just making out individual letters in words too. For example they often made a sign for a double s, as in kindness that actually looks like a p or f and people are often confused by this and Ks may look like Bs and if they can make out the first part of the word, it still looks exactly like Bindnep or worse. Anyway, this letter I am transcribing right now, the man's handwriting is very small and lots of abbreviations and this is a copy of a copy of the original. But I wanted to share this one part of the letter with you from a loving father to his little girl who is preteen and was sent to a Catholic school to be educated in Louisiana in 1835. I get to read a lot of civil war correspondence too which is cool but listen to the love of this father but also in the way he words his advise to her about what she needs to do, how maybe even without knowing it, he puts the burden on here of not only doing well to get along in the world but also to give him much pleasure in her. It is actually a very loving letter and see what you think of his advice to her.


Donaldsville
Louisiana December 20th 1835


My Dear Little Agnes,

You do not know my dear child how often I have thought of you since the melancholy morning we parted from you at Emmitsburg - That I love you dearly you well know and the necessity of leaving you for the first time among strangers was so distressing to me that it has made me sad whenever I have thought of it since. But there was one ting that consol'd me, I knew I was leaving you among those who wo'd be yr kind friends although they were strangers to you and besides that you wo'd among those friends begin yr education upon which depends so much of your respectability and happiness in this world - my dear child, if you act in all things according to my advice I am sure you will soon be, not only high in yr classes but what will give me equal pleasure, you will be a great favorite not only with the whole government of St Joseph's, but with all yr companions likewise - kindness, amiability and benevolence are the most beautiful traits in a young lady of character and where you find these you will be very apt to find all that is valuable besides - I most sincerely hope you have made yrself agreeable to all and to attain this end you ought to remember that many things are necessary - You sh'd at all times be good temper'd and affectionate and kind to every one, and then by being always just and honorable you will do what is most important in making yrself a favorite with all - There is one thing I have notic'd through life and it is this, that a good and kind hearted child at school and an upright and honorable one, is certain to make a good member of society in after-life - now my dear child be obedient in attending to all yr instructions, and then make all love you and I shall then love you myself if possible more than I now do, and most certainly I shall be much prouder of you than I ever co'd be if you were not to do as I wish in this respect.


What an interesting phrase too, " to make a good member of society in after-life", now this could mean her life after the school but also this man is not really fond of religion, he leaves that to the women, and he sends his regards to the Mother Prose of this place and adds a few words of praise for her and rewards for her in heaven, so one wonders if it could also be added to mean "the afterlife" since he knows this could be read by them. lol. I can't wait to see if there are any letters from her as to what her classes are that she will need in life. Are they like those in a girls finishing school and mostly about etiquette? or are there other kinds of classes too? I actually read some of just a few years later from one of the daughters talking about her algebra classes and science and thought it was pretty interesting for the mid 1800s in the south. Anyway, just thought you might find this interesting, if not, its not in the sections that will distract from the book :smileywink:




I found the above very interesting for many reasons: very interested in genealogy, interested to see that some things are not different from one culture to another; surprised at the mention of the afterlife, etc. Also the fact that this was written around 1835. Vivico, do you do with work with genealogy for your primary work or is this something you are doing as an aside (hobby, etc)? Letters like the above truly reveal the mores of a specific time.


I have volunteered for 10 years transcribing all kinds of vital records, birth, death, marriage, census records, all kinds from copies of the originals and microfiche from all over the world and as far back as early 1700s so that it can be then put onto the genealogical site familysearch.org for anyone to find some of their genealogy for free. I even got to do some Ellis Island records and they were very very hard to do. They also went on that site and also to the City of NY who then built a special Family History site on the Island itself a few years back. I got a Thank you letter of acknowledgment for that. So far our church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has accumulated over 500 million names and dates and made them available to anyone on that site for free. I love doing this and helping people. Well there was this woman who was in one of the Family History research facilities talking about this huge amount of family letters and government letters and things from this period that is just pure treasure to me but she needed help to transcribe them and asked a woman there is she knew anyone. She thought of me. So right now I am helping on that project with her and she pays me for 10 hours a week of doing it and I donate another 10 just to be of service to her, because I think what she is doing is great. She has done some before and turned it into the War Museum of one state and another historical society of another. And thats how I got to this :smileywink:




That is terrific vivico..I visited the genealogy library in Salt Lake City, Utah when I traveled there for business. Very impressive. Your church does a great job and helps many folks find their ancestors and learn about their past.

Bentley
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LisaSee
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Re: A father's love circa 1835

What an extraordinary letter! The parallels are amazingly close to what Peony is told. I do so wonder what he meant by the afterlife. I guess we'll never know.
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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A father's love circa 1835


LisaSee wrote:
What an extraordinary letter! The parallels are amazingly close to what Peony is told. I do so wonder what he meant by the afterlife. I guess we'll never know.


I have just begun doing this work for this lady, so who knows, I may run across something from the daughter back the father and find out. I do remember in one other letter, to his wife years earlier, he responded, as to Wilmer Jr being baptized, you know my feelings on that so do what YOU seem fit, I leave that to you. OHHHH, and guess what! He was in China for two years! During this time and writes to her that it is Chinese New Year, so he had time to write as his medical students were not in school The stamp, and 1800s stamp, survived all this time and was on the evenvelope with really cool symbols on it,the main one being a dragon. There were a few words I had to look up to see if i was spelling correctly because they were in Chinese and had something to do with the servants. I found it all rather interesting that I was doing this at the same time I am reading this book. Do you think one of my ancestors is calling me to China? Or research there? Pretty interesting huh. If the stamped one is not one I have given back to her yet, I will find it and tell you what it shows on it exactly. :smileyhappy:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
KPL
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KPL
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Registered: ‎09-04-2007
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Re: Ancestor Tablets / Spirit Tablets

Thanks so much, Lisa, for that little dotted 'i'...I was kind of thinking (that) that's what it meant and did, and recently told a friend that maybe it really WAS a dot, and that, in letting the spirits move on, it was probably like a bell that rings at the end of, say, "Period 3' in high school, signifying that it's now ok to leave that class and move on to the next.

I went to the urls for the pictures... they sure look better than I thought they would, particularly after Peony's reference to their ugliness.
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Fozzie
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Re: Ancestor Tablets / Spirit Tablets

[ Edited ]

LisaSee wrote:


Fozzie wrote:
I found this information, with pictures, on ancestral tablets:

http://anthromuseum.missouri.edu/minigalleries/chinesespirittablets/intro.shtml

You will recall the Peony visited the shrines of her ancestors in her home.

Also, this passage on page 34 mentions ancestral tablets in Peony Pavilion:

"Then, after checking the Register of Marriages, he determined that indeed Liniang had been destined to be with Mengmei, and --- since her ancestor tablet hadn't been dotted --- granted her permission to wander the world as a ghost in search of the husband she'd been fated to marry."

I don't know what it means to dot an ancestor tablet.




I tried to make the dotting of the ancestor tablet as simple as possible, but it's still confusing to a lot of people. There's a written character on the tablet that needs a special dot to be completed. (Think of it like dotting an "i.") If it isn't dotted, then the soul can't properly separate and go to its different places. Most important, that third of the sould that's supposed to reside in the tablet can't go there.



Given your answer, I have a feeling I haven't read all that is in the book on the ancestor tablets yet. I have only finished through Part I. Let me keep reading and I bet it will be clear.

Message Edited by Fozzie on 09-10-2007 09:58 AM
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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Fozzie
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Re: A father's love circa 1835

Thanks for the letter, Vivian. I bet that is very interesting work!
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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bentley
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Re: A comic strip on scholars and examinations

This is actually a very interesting fictional comic strip on the examination process and some of the rewards, customs, beliefs. However, there is still a lot of information gained and it is entertaining. (100 slides so it takes a little time)


http://www.china-on-site.com/pages/comic/904.php
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bentley
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Re: Yu Yuan Garden in Shanghai

Yu Yuan Garden in Shanghai:

click on the respective photos for more details:

http://arnisto.com/shanghai.html
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bentley
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Re: Hangzhou and West Lake

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bentley
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Re: Some pretty good pictures of Suzhou Gardens, etc.

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