Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

In our favorite passages thread, Vivco phrased a wonderful question, whether "LOVEsickness" might not really be "LIFEsickness" for such young women who had so little control over their own destinies.

Do you read Peony's (and others') refusal to take food as being "distracted by love" or do you read it as taking a desperate stand, where their choices in life are so limited that they must prove their own power to make choices simply by choosing NOT to take sustenance?

I was very startled, both at how alike these young women to contemporary girls facing the same issues, and at how poetically these images of the body were. Perhaps this is how romanticized Peony imagines her own starvation? Recall the dried flower that Baba lays on her chest that feels "heavy as a stone" (p91) on her dissipated body?

I had the image throughout the novel of the girls drying up from despair like leaves and blowing off in the wind (especially Peony's consciousness, of course).

How do you read this relationship between these young girls and eating?
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

Lisa made a comment in the welcome session about anorexia, footbinding and etc. They are all connected in every century that there ever was here on earth. Is it the concept of being born and depending on usually a mother for every essential that obtains life in us? Does that make us so independent for the need of belonging that even though we can feed ourselves, be independent, we still need that comfort we relied on from conception? The forever presence of another soul in our being. We fear aloneness, we fear not having that connection to another soul. Is that the reason in every century especially for young girls its that defection from having someone souly for themselves that they seek the comfort of something that will make them feel whole. Complete, fulfilled and so they turn to things, mostly negative but they are searching for something to fulfill them in their time of feeling so detached from a soul like when they were very young. Something that consumes them, like the binding feet, the not eating to make them more beautiful, the breast implants and so forth. Or maybe its a desire that we all have to belong, to be fulfilled even if we got this at conception through birth, through childhood. Or if we didn't get it as much as others. Does this consume everyone? Why are there more sucidies on young teenagers than any other age? They are the reasons, what is the answer? Is maybe this is just the course of life experience? Whether we come out of being a young teen or we don't.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness



rkubie wrote:
In our favorite passages thread, Vivco phrased a wonderful question, whether "LOVEsickness" might not really be "LIFEsickness" for such young women who had so little control over their own destinies.

Do you read Peony's (and others') refusal to take food as being "distracted by love" or do you read it as taking a desperate stand, where their choices in life are so limited that they must prove their own power to make choices simply by choosing NOT to take sustenance?

I was very startled, both at how alike these young women to contemporary girls facing the same issues, and at how poetically these images of the body were. Perhaps this is how romanticized Peony imagines her own starvation? Recall the dried flower that Baba lays on her chest that feels "heavy as a stone" (p91) on her dissipated body?

I had the image throughout the novel of the girls drying up from despair like leaves and blowing off in the wind (especially Peony's consciousness, of course).

How do you read this relationship between these young girls and eating?




Anorexia seems like "passive aggression". Silent aggression turned inwards...an eating away at one's own body. It is almost like these girls are saying, "See what I can do. You have no control of my eating or not. I can hurt myself if I want to and you have no control of me." I never thought that this kind of stand has a girl thinking outwardly that her decision to not eat will lead to her own death; I think when that reality finally strikes them..it is already in many instances too late. I think Peony and others who are suffering from this disease are not conscious of what the final outcome will be and their lives seem "out of control" to them and moving in a direction that they are afraid of or don't like. The only way they think they can put the brakes on and regain inner control is to refuse to eat or drink. On one level, it appears to be about control; but it is more about their lack of it. It is just like perfectionists who are so paralyzed that they cannot do anything for fear that it will not be perfect...so nothing is done. Their will to live is tied up in their desire to obtain sometimes things that are not attainable. It also seems to be tied up in a silent retaliation and deadly rebuttal to injustices they perceive themselves to have endured (real or not).
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


bentley wrote:


Anorexia seems like "passive aggression". Silent aggression turned inwards...an eating away at one's own body. It is almost like these girls are saying, "See what I can do. You have no control of my eating or not. I can hurt myself if I want to and you have no control of me." I never thought that this kind of stand has a girl thinking outwardly that her decision to not eat will lead to her own death; I think when that reality finally strikes them..it is already in many instances too late. I think Peony and others who are suffering from this disease are not conscious of what the final outcome will be and their lives seem "out of control" to them and moving in a direction that they are afraid of or don't like. The only way they think they can put the brakes on and regain inner control is to refuse to eat or drink. On one level, it appears to be about control; but it is more about their lack of it. It is just like perfectionists who are so paralyzed that they cannot do anything for fear that it will not be perfect...so nothing is done. Their will to live is tied up in their desire to obtain sometimes things that are not attainable. It also seems to be tied up in a silent retaliation and deadly rebuttal to injustices they perceive themselves to have endured (real or not).


very true bently and the trouble with this is it is not easy to cure at all! An anorexic or someone with other types of eating disorders are really hard to cure because while it is a way to try to at least have control of something,their bodies,they are never satisfied with their bodies, its not just about not eating, they dont see in the mirror what is really there, they see in the mirror, the image they think they see in the mirror of the eyes of others. Something obsessional about controlling this one thing, becomes dangerous because they have a faulty view of themselves and cant get to what they thing will satisfy them and others. This part of it is different then the not eating that Peony is doing. She may think there is no need for food in some false romantic idea that one does not need to eat if one is in love. Or she may be doing it as an act of control, a way out of this impeding marriage, but its not out of the faulty sense of what her body is, she actually sees herself as pretty. I see both as a type of the only kind of rebellion some young women can take but I see them as being for different reasons. This goes for cutters too, girls mostly, who cut themselves to feel better and its a very hard thing to stop. I still believe that in Peony's case, if early on, before it was too late, if her mother had said, if you do not eat,you will have your opera taken today! If you do not eat, you will displease your father and your ancestors and, I dont know get rough with her threaten her with that which is dear, mostly her opera that they know of, that Peony would have snapped out of it and eating to make sure to be able to keep her beloved opera. But they dont do that until its too late and she cant eat anyway! Both her parents left her till she is at deaths door or send word for her to eat and do nothing more if she doesnt until its too late and no one with her does either. This part I really didnt understand at all.Of course you wouldnt have the story if they had made her eat but at the same time, I couldnt understand why they waited till it was too late. It was like, instead of taking the bullets out of someone's gun, taking the gun from them after they shot themself and in such a strict society, why were the people around these girls waiting till it was too late when the signs where there?
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Author
LisaSee
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎08-24-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness



rkubie wrote:
In our favorite passages thread, Vivco phrased a wonderful question, whether "LOVEsickness" might not really be "LIFEsickness" for such young women who had so little control over their own destinies.

Do you read Peony's (and others') refusal to take food as being "distracted by love" or do you read it as taking a desperate stand, where their choices in life are so limited that they must prove their own power to make choices simply by choosing NOT to take sustenance?

I was very startled, both at how alike these young women to contemporary girls facing the same issues, and at how poetically these images of the body were. Perhaps this is how romanticized Peony imagines her own starvation? Recall the dried flower that Baba lays on her chest that feels "heavy as a stone" (p91) on her dissipated body?

I had the image throughout the novel of the girls drying up from despair like leaves and blowing off in the wind (especially Peony's consciousness, of course).

How do you read this relationship between these young girls and eating?




I'd like to respond to what everyone's written so far about this. Wow! Such thoughtful comments -- all of them very deep and provocative.

Not eating is about control and the lack of self-image. These girls -- as so many girls today -- feel they have no control in their lives, so the one thing they can control is what they put in their bodies. They are truly making a desperate stand to make their own choices. But the self-image part is also so devastating. They look in the mirror and see someone fat and think they have to eat even less. Or they look in the reflection of a pond and see their skirts hanging loose and don't see or understand it as a bad thing. They think they look beautiful or lovesick or still fat.

I agree completely with Bentley that these girls -- whether in the past or today -- didn't have a clue that they might die. They were totally oblivious to that. Again, this goes back to self-image. They truly don't see what's right in front of them. Bentely also wrote that their idea of control is actually a total lack of control. Boy, isn't that the truth!?

And Vivico brings up the whole idea of body image and how we see ourselves. we've been talking about girls who stop eating for various reasons. But aren't most women obsessed with one thing or another on their bodies? My hair's too curly or too straight. I'm too fat, too out of shape, too thin. I'm too short or too tall. My feet are too big and don't look good in high heels. I hate skirts, or I love skirts because they hide my butt. I hate my freckles, my olive skin, my pale skin. We all find things to hate about ourselves. They just vary from person to person. Why do we do that to ourselves and each other?
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


vivico1 wrote:
Something obsessional about controlling this one thing, becomes dangerous because they have a faulty view of themselves and cant get to what they thing will satisfy them and others. This part of it is different then the not eating that Peony is doing. She may think there is no need for food in some false romantic idea that one does not need to eat if one is in love. Or she may be doing it as an act of control, a way out of this impeding marriage, but its not out of the faulty sense of what her body is, she actually sees herself as pretty.




I think you make an important distinction here, Vivian, one that I want to emphasize. I think Lisa does a good job of distinguishing lovesickness from anorexia in the book. As you said, Peony's problem started not from a bad body image, but from sadness and depression. As Peony's lovesickness progressed, it took on the idea of control, or lack thereof, which is a commonality with anorexia. While I clearly see the similarities between lovesickness and anorexia, I believe I clearly see the differences too. Unfortunately, the outcome of both is much the same. Here are some relevant passages I noted in the book:

"I've come to believe that part of lovesickness comes from this conflict between control and desire. In love we have no control." (pg. 72)

"I could not eat for thoughts of him." (pg. 73)

"Not eating stopped being about maintaining control over my life. It even stopped being about my poet and the tumultuous feelings of love and longing I felt were consuming me. One of the sages once wrote : Only when you are suffering in extremity will the poetry you write be any good." (pgs. 81-2)

These quotes show a clear progression of Peony's condition, first driven by lovesickness, then driven by the idea that she must suffer in order to write well.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


Fozzie wrote:

vivico1 wrote:
Something obsessional about controlling this one thing, becomes dangerous because they have a faulty view of themselves and cant get to what they thing will satisfy them and others. This part of it is different then the not eating that Peony is doing. She may think there is no need for food in some false romantic idea that one does not need to eat if one is in love. Or she may be doing it as an act of control, a way out of this impeding marriage, but its not out of the faulty sense of what her body is, she actually sees herself as pretty.




I think you make an important distinction here, Vivian, one that I want to emphasize. I think Lisa does a good job of distinguishing lovesickness from anorexia in the book. As you said, Peony's problem started not from a bad body image, but from sadness and depression. As Peony's lovesickness progressed, it took on the idea of control, or lack thereof, which is a commonality with anorexia. While I clearly see the similarities between lovesickness and anorexia, I believe I clearly see the differences too. Unfortunately, the outcome of both is much the same. Here are some relevant passages I noted in the book:

"I've come to believe that part of lovesickness comes from this conflict between control and desire. In love we have no control." (pg. 72)

"I could not eat for thoughts of him." (pg. 73)

"Not eating stopped being about maintaining control over my life. It even stopped being about my poet and the tumultuous feelings of love and longing I felt were consuming me. One of the sages once wrote : Only when you are suffering in extremity will the poetry you write be any good." (pgs. 81-2)

These quotes show a clear progression of Peony's condition, first driven by lovesickness, then driven by the idea that she must suffer in order to write well.


good points and quotes Fozzie!
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

I thought this site was interesting and might answer some questions:

http://www.anred.com/who.html
Frequent Contributor
Pat_T
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎09-05-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

I agree with what people have written about eating disorders being about control and body image. I thought it was interesting that early in the book (p. 20) Peony uses food against her cousin Broom. Her mother, Second Aunt, "was softhearted and as a result Broom already had the roundness of a woman past childbearing years. The other aunts, and my mother included, all campaigned to keep her from eating too much, hoping that once she was married out her bad luck would be removed from the compound." On the next page Broom laughs at Peony's "perfect match" and Peony responds by telling her to have another dumpling and pushes the platter at her. Broom sneaks a peek at the mother's table and then pops a dumpling whole into her mouth while the other cousins stare at Peony with evil in their eyes. Mealtime in the women's quarters at the Chen Family Villa seems to be a time for gossip, jealousy and one-upmanship.

These teenagers are so restricted in their movements and limited in their experiences while being taught to focus on their appearance and their relationship to others. I don't think it is surprising that Peony becomes consumed with a fantasy world she has created where she is the center and can see herself as completely loved by her poet.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness



Pat_T wrote:
I agree with what people have written about eating disorders being about control and body image. I thought it was interesting that early in the book (p. 20) Peony uses food against her cousin Broom. Her mother, Second Aunt, "was softhearted and as a result Broom already had the roundness of a woman past childbearing years. The other aunts, and my mother included, all campaigned to keep her from eating too much, hoping that once she was married out her bad luck would be removed from the compound." On the next page Broom laughs at Peony's "perfect match" and Peony responds by telling her to have another dumpling and pushes the platter at her. Broom sneaks a peek at the mother's table and then pops a dumpling whole into her mouth while the other cousins stare at Peony with evil in their eyes. Mealtime in the women's quarters at the Chen Family Villa seems to be a time for gossip, jealousy and one-upmanship.

These teenagers are so restricted in their movements and limited in their experiences while being taught to focus on their appearance and their relationship to others. I don't think it is surprising that Peony becomes consumed with a fantasy world she has created where she is the center and can see herself as completely loved by her poet.




I agree with you Pat and you identified a key point about the use of food as a sort of weapon. There was a lot of jealousy and backbiting and Broom's comfort seemed to be in food. Eating is one of the few social and iteractive outlets that these young girls had aside from Peony's mother's embroidery contests. Their appearance became what they were and how they were judged. I liked the father's quotes about the development of Peony's inner beauty in Chapter Two and I believe that he was on the right track at least at that point in the novel. I also agree that a bright girl like Peony who did not have many intellectual outlets would turn within and foster a totally separate fantasy world where she could do risky things and live an alternate and more interesting existence. Nobody could control her mind.
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

[ Edited ]

Fozzie wrote:

vivico1 wrote:
Something obsessional about controlling this one thing, becomes dangerous because they have a faulty view of themselves and cant get to what they thing will satisfy them and others. This part of it is different then the not eating that Peony is doing. She may think there is no need for food in some false romantic idea that one does not need to eat if one is in love. Or she may be doing it as an act of control, a way out of this impeding marriage, but its not out of the faulty sense of what her body is, she actually sees herself as pretty.




I think you make an important distinction here, Vivian, one that I want to emphasize. I think Lisa does a good job of distinguishing lovesickness from anorexia in the book. As you said, Peony's problem started not from a bad body image, but from sadness and depression. As Peony's lovesickness progressed, it took on the idea of control, or lack thereof, which is a commonality with anorexia. While I clearly see the similarities between lovesickness and anorexia, I believe I clearly see the differences too. Unfortunately, the outcome of both is much the same. Here are some relevant passages I noted in the book:

"I've come to believe that part of lovesickness comes from this conflict between control and desire. In love we have no control." (pg. 72)

"I could not eat for thoughts of him." (pg. 73)

"Not eating stopped being about maintaining control over my life. It even stopped being about my poet and the tumultuous feelings of love and longing I felt were consuming me. One of the sages once wrote : Only when you are suffering in extremity will the poetry you write be any good." (pgs. 81-2)

These quotes show a clear progression of Peony's condition, first driven by lovesickness, then driven by the idea that she must suffer in order to write well.



I noticed these passages as well Fozzie. Control was mentioned over and over again. This passage was also on page 73:

Through lessons, aphorisms, and acquired skills we are molded...and controlled....
Together, these women
(her mother, aunts and future mother-in-law) - from the time I was born until the day I died - would control every single minute of my life. Yet for every effort at control, I was spinning away.

Her poet had become a part of her and everything she did, including all of the skills she was forced to practice. They can control her actions but not her thoughts.

Message Edited by Wrighty on 09-08-2007 01:55 AM
Author
LisaSee
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎08-24-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness



Wrighty wrote:

Fozzie wrote:

vivico1 wrote:
Something obsessional about controlling this one thing, becomes dangerous because they have a faulty view of themselves and cant get to what they thing will satisfy them and others. This part of it is different then the not eating that Peony is doing. She may think there is no need for food in some false romantic idea that one does not need to eat if one is in love. Or she may be doing it as an act of control, a way out of this impeding marriage, but its not out of the faulty sense of what her body is, she actually sees herself as pretty.




I think you make an important distinction here, Vivian, one that I want to emphasize. I think Lisa does a good job of distinguishing lovesickness from anorexia in the book. As you said, Peony's problem started not from a bad body image, but from sadness and depression. As Peony's lovesickness progressed, it took on the idea of control, or lack thereof, which is a commonality with anorexia. While I clearly see the similarities between lovesickness and anorexia, I believe I clearly see the differences too. Unfortunately, the outcome of both is much the same. Here are some relevant passages I noted in the book:

"I've come to believe that part of lovesickness comes from this conflict between control and desire. In love we have no control." (pg. 72)

"I could not eat for thoughts of him." (pg. 73)

"Not eating stopped being about maintaining control over my life. It even stopped being about my poet and the tumultuous feelings of love and longing I felt were consuming me. One of the sages once wrote : Only when you are suffering in extremity will the poetry you write be any good." (pgs. 81-2)

These quotes show a clear progression of Peony's condition, first driven by lovesickness, then driven by the idea that she must suffer in order to write well.



I noticed these passages as well Fozzie. Control was mentioned over and over again. This passage was also on page 73:

Through lessons, aphorisms, and acquired skills we are molded...and controlled....
Together, these women
(her mother, aunts and future mother-in-law) - from the time I was born until the day I died - would control every single minute of my life. Yet for every effort at control, I was spinning away.

Her poet had become a part of her and everything she did, including all of the skills she was forced to practice. They can control her actions but not her thoughts.

Message Edited by Wrighty on 09-08-2007 01:55 AM




I agree with what everyone has written. But may I say something else? I'm so delighted that you have all picked up on things that I tried to show -- for example, the way women can use food as a weapon, a defense, as solace, as revenge, as surrender.

I've been married for 27 years, so it's been a long time since I've fallen in love. But I remember back in the day that when I did fall in love, I always lost weight. And these days I can always tell when a friend has fallen in love, because she's suddenly dropped ten pounds. Do we forget to eat? Or do our metabolisms change in the first moments of love? Either way, what happens to Peony goes way beyond that.
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


LisaSee wrote:
I agree with what everyone has written. But may I say something else? I'm so delighted that you have all picked up on things that I tried to show -- for example, the way women can use food as a weapon, a defense, as solace, as revenge, as surrender.

I've been married for 27 years, so it's been a long time since I've fallen in love. But I remember back in the day that when I did fall in love, I always lost weight. And these days I can always tell when a friend has fallen in love, because she's suddenly dropped ten pounds. Do we forget to eat? Or do our metabolisms change in the first moments of love? Either way, what happens to Peony goes way beyond that.



That is a strange isn't it? It's been a long time since I've fallen in love too but I do remember how strong the feelings are. They overwhelm your whole body. I just wasn't even hungry. During breakups I lost my appetite as well but that was for different reasons. It was all because of stress. Some people eat when they are stressed but I was unable to. During a bad breakup in high school I lost a lot of weight before things improved. I wasn't aware of it at all because the feelings were so strong it was a form of grief. I know that sounds dumb but feelings are so intense when you're a teenager. Everything is magnified. I promised myself that I would never belittle my own kids' feelings about anything. The emotions may not always be appropriate but they are real. I've also had a family member attempt suicide and one accomplish it when they were young. Their main reasons were because of relationship problems.
Frequent Contributor
cindersue
Posts: 323
Registered: ‎04-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

In regards to anorexia ... I have a friend that works with mental and behavioral problem kids. She said she'd rather work with drug addicts and acoholoics then treating eating disorder patients. She said they are full of anger and very difficult to work with.

In the book, I also blame Peony's mom for locking her in her room, not communicating with her. Shutting her out. I felt it was to late to save Peony when her mom starting coming to her room, trying to get her out again. Of course, this part makes the way for the story, doesn't it. :smileywink:
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


cindersue wrote:
In regards to anorexia ... I have a friend that works with mental and behavioral problem kids. She said she'd rather work with drug addicts and acoholoics then treating eating disorder patients. She said they are full of anger and very difficult to work with.

In the book, I also blame Peony's mom for locking her in her room, not communicating with her. Shutting her out. I felt it was to late to save Peony when her mom starting coming to her room, trying to get her out again. Of course, this part makes the way for the story, doesn't it. :smileywink:



And as Lisa has reminded us this is told from Peony's viewpoint and there is more to the story to come. :smileyhappy:
Frequent Contributor
cindersue
Posts: 323
Registered: ‎04-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness

hmmmm, I can hardly wait to find out the ending of the story :smileywink:
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


cindersue wrote:
hmmmm, I can hardly wait to find out the ending of the story :smileywink:


well stop belly laughing about stuff and get to reading cindersue LOL :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Frequent Contributor
cindersue
Posts: 323
Registered: ‎04-02-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness



vivico1 wrote:

cindersue wrote:
hmmmm, I can hardly wait to find out the ending of the story :smileywink:


well stop belly laughing about stuff and get to reading cindersue LOL :smileywink:




think you put this post in the wrong place Viv. :smileywink: Stayed up to late? :smileyvery-happy:
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Eating, Anorexia, Lovesickness


cindersue wrote:


vivico1 wrote:

cindersue wrote:
hmmmm, I can hardly wait to find out the ending of the story :smileywink:


well stop belly laughing about stuff and get to reading cindersue LOL :smileywink:




think you put this post in the wrong place Viv. :smileywink: Stayed up to late? :smileyvery-happy:


Huh uh, not going to put it there LOL, just saying, how you going to know the end if you doing get to reading girl :smileywink: Sitting around laughing it up at all hours of the night! hehe
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 257 guests
Recent signins:
Please welcome our newest community members: