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Rachel-K
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Favorite Passages?

I will have to start us off with one of mine:

on p. 35, Peony is on the way to her rendevous:

"I pressed my fingers hard against my eyes and brought my mother into that pain. If I had any reason left, I would have seen her disappointment in me. If I had any sense, I would have known how severe her anger would be. Instead, I tried to bring into my mind her dignity, her beauty, her stature. This was my home, my garden, my pavilion, my night, my moon, my life."

I love this passage, both because of the writing, and because of the surpise and force of this power surge (for lack of a more poetic way to describe it), that Peony's desire gives her. And her sense of her own self/family/history/place all play a part in that feeling.
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Re: Favorite Passages?/ page numbers here, so no spoilers???


rkubie wrote:
I will have to start us off with one of mine:

on p. 35, Peony is on the way to her rendevous:

"I pressed my fingers hard against my eyes and brought my mother into that pain. If I had any reason left, I would have seen her disappointment in me. If I had any sense, I would have known how severe her anger would be. Instead, I tried to bring into my mind her dignity, her beauty, her stature. This was my home, my garden, my pavilion, my night, my moon, my life."

I love this passage, both because of the writing, and because of the surpise and force of this power surge (for lack of a more poetic way to describe it), that Peony's desire gives her. And her sense of her own self/family/history/place all play a part in that feeling.


May I make on suggestion on this thread if its ok? When you write about your favorite passage, since the club has just started and many of us have not even finished the book, could everyone put in the message subject , what pages you are writing about, so we dont inadvertently read a spoiler? thanks. :smileyhappy:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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mairwill
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Re: Favorite Passages?/ page numbers here, so no spoilers???

Vivian and All--

Great idea! I find it difficult to know how much to say when I've read the whole book but others have not. And it also bothers me when I've not read all the book and someone says something that gives the story away without putting spoiler in the subject heading.

It would also be great if sections were set up by our moderator dividing the book's discussions into beginning, middle, and end.

Later--

Mair
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vivico1
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Re: Favorite Passages?/ page numbers here, so no spoilers???


mairwill wrote:
Vivian and All--

Great idea! I find it difficult to know how much to say when I've read the whole book but others have not. And it also bothers me when I've not read all the book and someone says something that gives the story away without putting spoiler in the subject heading.

It would also be great if sections were set up by our moderator dividing the book's discussions into beginning, middle, and end.

Later--

Mair


you got that right!~
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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bentley
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Re: Favorite Passages? Epigram - Potential Spoiler

If you have not read any part of Peony in Love: please do not read further - SPOILER.

Epigram:

The epigram to the book was very moving to me. I wonder who would you die for in the name of love? For your children, your spouse, your parents? Who would you rather save and who would be more important than life itself for you. Whose love makes your life worth living or more alive? Of course, we must also have self love...but when I think of my children,,I believe I would do anything to save them if I had to and/or could and most mothers I believe would feel the same way. Of course, in this case, the love discussed most likely deals with the love for a spouse or lover.

The preface to The Peony Pavillion by Tang Xianzu (1598) moved me tremendously especially these lines:

"Love is of source unknown, yet it grows ever deeper. The living may die of it, by its power the dead live again. Love is not love at its fullest if one who lives is unwilling to die for it, or if it cannot restore to life one who has died."

Very beautiful!
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bentley
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler

If you have not read Chapter One, read no further: SPOILER

Riding the Wind (page 13)

"Pity one whose beauty is a bright flower, when life endures no longer than a leaf on a tree." "I finally understand what the poets have written. In spring, moved to passion; in autumn, only regret. Oh, will I ever see a man? How will love find me? Where can I reveal my true desires."

The above lines from the opera "The Peony Pavillion" speak of closeted emotions, bound up by tradition and silence and secrecy. Young women yearned for the romances and love of their dreams; but everything was pre-arranged. Passion and indiscretion only led to shame and hurt and bad choices which were later regretted at leisure. Bad choices equated to a bad life. The young women's feet were not the only thing bound up.

Riding the Wind (page 14)

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler

[ Edited ]
Bently wrote:

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.



vivico1 wrote:
This to me is worse than dying for love, I think we are all capable of dying for love,not in the wasting away lovesick kind Peony did but in the sense of, taking a bullet for them, being willing to take on their illness if you could instead of them, stepping in front of your child to save them from a pitbull attack. I think we are all capable of that even if we never have to find out. So your question before this one, who would you die for, most people would could say they would die for the ones they love(and not die because you cant have them, like Peony did, she didnt die because of love, she died out of depression and in a way, as an attack against whoever or whatever would keep her from having what she wanted, but she didnt die FOR love.)
Most people would or could die for those they love by doing many things to save them, as mentioned above or even something like, give them your food when you then have none, all kinds of scenerios. But LIVING with such feelings, as you mention here, for someone and never showing it, never exercising it because you know you cant, its wrong and it just cant be, even if the one you love wants it to, to walk away, because you know in the long run, or even short, that it is just not right for them and could hurt others too, to know you could be together but to do so would be impossible and in the end, bring misery, to love someone enough to let go and walk away, no matter how much it hurts, I think is a bigger love than "dying" for someone, in the way Peony did. Living without them, so they can be happy, truly happy in ways not "only hidden", I think is the bigger love.

Edited by Admin. for formatting only.

Message Edited by Jessica on 11-01-2007 11:41 AM
Vivian
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bentley
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage) - Spoiler

If you have not read Chapter Two of Part One (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage), please read no further. Potential Spoiler.

In this chapter, one sees how the story begins to examine the Chinese veneration of ancestors. Additionally, one can see how Peony devalues herself as a young girl versus being a son. (burdened by a single useless daughter) - page 23

I loved the part about the family's ancestor tablets.

"I entered the hall where we kept my family's ancestor tablets. The tablets - slips of wood inscribed with the names of my ancestors written in gilden characters - hung on the walls. Here were my grandparents, great-uncles and great-aunts, and countless cousins, many times removed, who had been born, lived, and died in the Chen Family Villa. At death, their souls had separated into three parts and gone to new homes in the afterworld, the grave, and their ancestor tablets. Looking at the tablets, I could not only trace my family back more than nine generations. I could prevail upon the bit of soul that resided in each one to help me". (pages 18 and 19)

I just loved the concept that the dead helped the living and that their souls survived and resided in part in the ancestor tablet so that their legacy lives on and is venerated. How often do I think of the genealogy of my family that way...showing reverance and love for the lives that went before us.

When Peony asks for help from Grandmother Chen, I am struck by how little is shared with Peony about her grandmother's fate. I thought it so odd when I read, "The highest goal a woman could achieve in life was to be a chaste widow who would not accept a second marriage, not even if it meant taking her own life." (page 19)

There seemed to so much jealousy and backbiting among the women relatives and cousins (more than likely juggling for position and/or rataliation). Some of the cousins seemed doomed from birth.

"I didn't understand that my cousins and I were trapped like good-luck crickets in bamboo-and-lacquer cages." (page 22)

How apt..little caged birds/insects.

About Honor:

I was struck by Baba's words about why he did or did not do certain things. It was hard for him to capitulate to the Qing emperor since he was a Ming loyalist.

"Men are not like women. We go into the outer realm where we are seen. I had to do as the Manchus ordered or risk decapitation. If I had died, how would our family, our home, our land, and all of the people who work for us have survived? We've suffered so much already." (page 23)

Baba never realized that he was saying that women were not seen and most likely not heard either. Invisible. It was interesting that Peony had observed that her father had turned inward like women. I had to ask myself at that point..what was her father hiding and/or what emotions had he buried. I also was very suspicious of the mother and father's relationship and the quality of it. They seemed to be always at odds and saw everything so differently. It was also odd to me that there were so many works by women in Baba's library (had to find talent in unusual places) - page 24.

This quote reminded me of how I felt about books:

"I loved books. I loved the weight of them in my hands. I loved the smell of the ink and the feel of the rice paper." (page 25)

The imagery about Peony's mother could be felt in the following quotation:

"When she was happy, she could change ice crystals into flowers. When she was sad or angry- as she was now-she could turn dark clouds into swarms of biting insects." (page 31)

Peony's mother thinks that an overeducated daughter is a dead daughter and that talent is not a gift we should wish on Peony. Yikes..scary and I am very fearful already for Peony.

I loved what her father said: "While she is lovely, we need to remember that her face is not what distinguishes her. Her beauty is a reflection of the virtue and talent she keeps inside." (page 31)

Of course by the end of the chapter, one has to wonder what boundaries Peony will cross and how far she will go in that crossing. I am afraid for her trying to find balance in that household during that time period. I also have questions about the potential match for Peony and whether there is something she does not suspect or know that others might. And of course what is she going to do about the stranger?

I enjoyed the second chapter much more than the beginning and am being drawn much more into the fabric of the story than I initially was. Sometimes you cannot save someone from themselves and this might be the case with Peony.
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage) - Spoiler


bentley wrote:
If you have not read Chapter Two of Part One (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage), please read no further. Potential Spoiler.

In this chapter, one sees..................







.


holy cow bently, you got a lot of favorite passages for just 35 pages so far! LOL :smileywink: just messing with ya
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage) - Spoiler


vivico1 wrote:

bentley wrote:
If you have not read Chapter Two of Part One (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage), please read no further. Potential Spoiler.

In this chapter, one sees..................







.


holy cow bently, you got a lot of favorite passages for just 35 pages so far! LOL :smileywink: just messing with ya




Ya I know..lol..I think there is a lot of the symbolism foreshadowing what is to come.

Chapter Two was chock full...you are a little ahead of me but I am catching up.
")
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage) - Spoiler


bentley wrote:

vivico1 wrote:

bentley wrote:
If you have not read Chapter Two of Part One (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage), please read no further. Potential Spoiler.

In this chapter, one sees..................







.


holy cow bently, you got a lot of favorite passages for just 35 pages so far! LOL :smileywink: just messing with ya




Ya I know..lol..I think there is a lot of the symbolism foreshadowing what is to come.

Chapter Two was chock full...you are a little ahead of me but I am catching up.
")


I'll just wait till you quote each chapter here LOL and read the book here lollol. :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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kiakar
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler



vivico1 wrote:
Bently wrote:

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
vivico1 wrote:
This to me is worse than dying for love, I think we are all capable of dying for love,not in the wasting away lovesick kind Peony did but in the sense of, taking a bullet for them, being willing to take on their illness if you could instead of them, stepping in front of your child to save them from a pitbull attack. I think we are all capable of that even if we never have to find out. So your question before this one, who would you die for, most people would could say they would die for the ones they love(and not die because you cant have them, like Peony did, she didnt die because of love, she died out of depression and in a way, as an attack against whoever or whatever would keep her from having what she wanted, but she didnt die FOR love.)
Most people would or could die for those they love by doing many things to save them, as mentioned above or even something like, give them your food when you then have none, all kinds of scenerios. But LIVING with such feelings, as you mention here, for someone and never showing it, never exercising it because you know you cant, its wrong and it just cant be, even if the one you love wants it to, to walk away, because you know in the long run, or even short, that it is just not right for them and could hurt others too, to know you could be together but to do so would be impossible and in the end, bring misery, to love someone enough to let go and walk away, no matter how much it hurts, I think is a bigger love than "dying" for someone, in the way Peony did. Living without them, so they can be happy, truly happy in ways not "only hidden", I think is the bigger love.




I think you are right, Vivico. She didn't die from loving someone. She died thinking she would never know true love. It seems a trait for lovesickness or something was common in that time. Of course the opera was about that also. But it was something she knew about and apparently knew deep inside what she was doing. If she couldn't have real love, her life was not worth living.
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bentley
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage) - Spoiler

Folks, if you have read ONLY the first two sections of the book, please do not read
further.



vivico1 wrote:

bentley wrote:

vivico1 wrote:

bentley wrote:
If you have not read Chapter Two of Part One (Bamboo-and-Lacquer Cage), please read no further. Potential Spoiler.

In this chapter, one sees..................







.


holy cow bently, you got a lot of favorite passages for just 35 pages so far! LOL :smileywink: just messing with ya




Ya I know..lol..I think there is a lot of the symbolism foreshadowing what is to come.

Chapter Two was chock full...you are a little ahead of me but I am catching up.
")


I'll just wait till you quote each chapter here LOL and read the book here lollol. :smileywink:




I hardly think that happened. However, since I had only read the first two sections, I had not yet known that Peony had died as was revealed in your response. I had put spoilers in the message subject as you had suggested (which btw is a good idea) and it avoids others from having their reading experience spoiled. And I did like the passages quoted very much.

I respectfully suggest that responses are cited with chapter and page with spoiler headings. And when responding maybe try to be careful not to give away what is to come. However, I have to admit that one knew something was not going to work out very well from chapter one so everything was not an entire surprise.

The book really deals with what happens after that event so not all is lost.
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - Jade Shaddering (thru about page 95) - Potential Spoiler

[ Edited ]

kiakar wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
Bently wrote:

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
vivico1 wrote:
This to me is worse than dying for love, I think we are all capable of dying for love,not in the wasting away lovesick kind Peony did but in the sense of, taking a bullet for them, being willing to take on their illness if you could instead of them, stepping in front of your child to save them from a pitbull attack. I think we are all capable of that even if we never have to find out. So your question before this one, who would you die for, most people would could say they would die for the ones they love(and not die because you cant have them, like Peony did, she didnt die because of love, she died out of depression and in a way, as an attack against whoever or whatever would keep her from having what she wanted, but she didnt die FOR love.)
Most people would or could die for those they love by doing many things to save them, as mentioned above or even something like, give them your food when you then have none, all kinds of scenerios. But LIVING with such feelings, as you mention here, for someone and never showing it, never exercising it because you know you cant, its wrong and it just cant be, even if the one you love wants it to, to walk away, because you know in the long run, or even short, that it is just not right for them and could hurt others too, to know you could be together but to do so would be impossible and in the end, bring misery, to love someone enough to let go and walk away, no matter how much it hurts, I think is a bigger love than "dying" for someone, in the way Peony did. Living without them, so they can be happy, truly happy in ways not "only hidden", I think is the bigger love.




I think you are right, Vivico. She didn't die from loving someone. She died thinking she would never know true love. It seems a trait for lovesickness or something was common in that time. Of course the opera was about that also. But it was something she knew about and apparently knew deep inside what she was doing. If she couldn't have real love, her life was not worth living.


yeah but was it really about , "if she couldnt have real love it wasnt worth living" that kept her from eating and in the end dying or, since even she admitted there was always hope of falling in love with your husband, was it more about a 16 year old starting to really figure out, maybe because of her emerging feelings for the stranger, that her life is not her own and never will be? Is it really about not having love, or not having control of her own life in any aspect, that brings on this death. Was being "lovesick" really about love or was it a term invented maybe by men, for when women got despondent or depressed about their life and stopped eating, or got sick, because then men could put it all on silly women emotion or evil spirits that needed to be cured, rather than even think or talk about the idea that a woman may not be "happy" with her lot with men? Was lovesick really being LIFEsick?

Message Edited by vivico1 on 09-05-2007 08:46 AM
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Part One - Jade Shaddering (thru about page 95) - Potential Spoiler

[ Edited ]

bentley wrote:
Folks, if you have read ONLY the first two sections of the book, please do not read
further.





I hardly think that happened. However, since I had only read the first two sections, I had not yet known that Peony had died as was revealed in your response. I had put spoilers in the message subject as you had suggested (which btw is a good idea) and it avoids others from having their reading experience spoiled. And I did like the passages quoted very much.

I respectfully suggest that responses are cited with chapter and page with spoiler headings. And when responding maybe try to be careful not to give away what is to come. However, I have to admit that one knew something was not going to work out very well from chapter one so everything was not an entire surprise.

The book really deals with what happens after that event so not all is lost.


Bently, I am sorry if you hadnt gotten to the place where she died. I used the same headings that said spoiler on them, to respond to, and they already said spoiler on them. And as here, the heading says PART ONE. I looked back for where we talked about her dying and dont see it right now but yes we need spoiler warnings and I apologize if that was not clear. We also need some topic and page headings from a moderator as you suggested, we need them a lot!


I came back and put a page # on this one too , just in case. I cant change the other one to page numbers tho, sorry.

Message Edited by vivico1 on 09-05-2007 08:50 AM
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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bentley
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler

[ Edited ]


If you have read only through page 32, do not read the following response. There is discussion of events which reveals segments beyond this page.




kiakar wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
Bently wrote:

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.



vivico1 wrote:
This to me is worse than dying for love, I think we are all capable of dying for love,not in the wasting away lovesick kind Peony did but in the sense of, taking a bullet for them, being willing to take on their illness if you could instead of them, stepping in front of your child to save them from a pitbull attack. I think we are all capable of that even if we never have to find out. So your question before this one, who would you die for, most people would could say they would die for the ones they love(and not die because you cant have them, like Peony did, she didnt die because of love, she died out of depression and in a way, as an attack against whoever or whatever would keep her from having what she wanted, but she didnt die FOR love.)
Most people would or could die for those they love by doing many things to save them, as mentioned above or even something like, give them your food when you then have none, all kinds of scenerios. But LIVING with such feelings, as you mention here, for someone and never showing it, never exercising it because you know you cant, its wrong and it just cant be, even if the one you love wants it to, to walk away, because you know in the long run, or even short, that it is just not right for them and could hurt others too, to know you could be together but to do so would be impossible and in the end, bring misery, to love someone enough to let go and walk away, no matter how much it hurts, I think is a bigger love than "dying" for someone, in the way Peony did. Living without them, so they can be happy, truly happy in ways not "only hidden", I think is the bigger love.




I think you are right, Vivico. She didn't die from loving someone. She died thinking she would never know true love. It seems a trait for lovesickness or something was common in that time. Of course the opera was about that also. But it was something she knew about and apparently knew deep inside what she was doing. If she couldn't have real love, her life was not worth living



Response to vivico and kiakar:

As much as I have grown to appreciate Peony and her specialness; what she did to herself was the same kind of destruction that happens to young girls who are anorexic or bulemic. I respectfully see disappointment and sadness in what she did to herself and I can only say that she did not show love to herself by what she did and/or to others. What her mother did to her also contributed to the outcome; but this form of silent self imposed suicide cannot be rationalized. The ancient Chinese culture seemed to revere women who did not allow certain things to happen to them rather than to live through serious injustices: like what her grandmother had chosen to do rather than to be given to the Manchu soldiers. (PAGE 19) The futility of what Peony did was only too apparent; but was more than likely predicted by the grandmother's ancestral tablet and life and the fact that Peony consulted it as part of her decision making process. Cultural expectations seemed to also be a part of what contributed to her physical death. This passive destruction has only one end. Love for others to protect them in the face of danger is one thing but destroying oneself is another. And the irony was that she was in fact going to find real love; and did not trust the wisdom of her father to protect her and to find a proper suitor.


Message Edited by Jessica on 11-01-2007 11:42 AM
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Re: Favorite Passages?

If you have not finished Peony in Love DO NOT read this!

There are many beautiful passages in this lovely book, but my favorite passage is the last one. The ending words
"I thought a lot about love. All women on earth-and men too, for that matter-hope for the kind of love that transforms us,raises us up out of the everyday, and gives us the courage to survive our little deaths: the heartache of unfulfilled dreams, of career and personal disappointments, of broken love affairs"
This just says so much to my hopelessly romantic heart. And I think about Peony's courage and I know that I lack that kind of courage. But we do share that hope for love.
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Re: Favorite Passages? Epigram - Potential Spoiler

I have a few thoughts here:

I also love what Tang Xianzu wrote. In fact, it inspired me almost everyday when I was writing the book.

I once read a study that said that men will always save their wives and women will always save their children in life-saving situations.

Finally, to me Peony in Love is about all facets of love, not just that between a man and woman. Peony learns a lot about love for and from her grandmother, mother, and father. She also comes to experience the love of a mother with Yi, but that comes much later in the story.




bentley wrote:
If you have not read any part of Peony in Love: please do not read further - SPOILER.

Epigram:

The epigram to the book was very moving to me. I wonder who would you die for in the name of love? For your children, your spouse, your parents? Who would you rather save and who would be more important than life itself for you. Whose love makes your life worth living or more alive? Of course, we must also have self love...but when I think of my children,,I believe I would do anything to save them if I had to and/or could and most mothers I believe would feel the same way. Of course, in this case, the love discussed most likely deals with the love for a spouse or lover.

The preface to The Peony Pavillion by Tang Xianzu (1598) moved me tremendously especially these lines:

"Love is of source unknown, yet it grows ever deeper. The living may die of it, by its power the dead live again. Love is not love at its fullest if one who lives is unwilling to die for it, or if it cannot restore to life one who has died."

Very beautiful!


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LisaSee
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎08-24-2007
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler

[ Edited ]

vivico1 wrote:
Bently wrote:

"My mother had trained me never to show my feelings, but when I read The Peony Pavillion, I felt certain things: love, sadness, happiness."

Poor Peony..such normal emotions that could not be exercised and felt...only hidden.

vivico1 wrote:
This to me is worse than dying for love, I think we are all capable of dying for love,not in the wasting away lovesick kind Peony did but in the sense of, taking a bullet for them, being willing to take on their illness if you could instead of them, stepping in front of your child to save them from a pitbull attack. I think we are all capable of that even if we never have to find out. So your question before this one, who would you die for, most people would could say they would die for the ones they love(and not die because you cant have them, like Peony did, she didnt die because of love, she died out of depression and in a way, as an attack against whoever or whatever would keep her from having what she wanted, but she didnt die FOR love.)
Most people would or could die for those they love by doing many things to save them, as mentioned above or even something like, give them your food when you then have none, all kinds of scenerios. But LIVING with such feelings, as you mention here, for someone and never showing it, never exercising it because you know you cant, its wrong and it just cant be, even if the one you love wants it to, to walk away, because you know in the long run, or even short, that it is just not right for them and could hurt others too, to know you could be together but to do so would be impossible and in the end, bring misery, to love someone enough to let go and walk away, no matter how much it hurts, I think is a bigger love than "dying" for someone, in the way Peony did. Living without them, so they can be happy, truly happy in ways not "only hidden", I think is the bigger love.




Does Peony die for love? Or is she trying to feel something when the world and society tell her she shouldn't? Or is she just trying to exercise some control in her life when she has absolutely no control? The one thing she could control -- like anorexic girls today -- was what she put in her mouth.

Message Edited by Jessica on 11-01-2007 11:42 AM
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vivico1
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Re: Favorite Passages? Part One - In the Garden - (Riding the Wind) - Potential Spoiler


LisaSee wrote:



Does Peony die for love? Or is she trying to feel something when the world and society tell her she shouldn't? Or is she just trying to exercise some control in her life when she has absolutely no control? The one thing she could control -- like anorexic girls today -- was what she put in her mouth.


This is exactly what I was saying on the other post on this thread where I said,

yeah but was it really about , "if she couldnt have real love it wasnt worth living" that kept her from eating and in the end dying or, since even she admitted there was always hope of falling in love with your husband, was it more about a 16 year old starting to really figure out, maybe because of her emerging feelings for the stranger, that her life is not her own and never will be? Is it really about not having love, or not having control of her own life in any aspect, that brings on this death. Was being "lovesick" really about love or was it a term invented maybe by men, for when women got despondent or depressed about their life and stopped eating, or got sick, because then men could put it all on silly women emotion or evil spirits that needed to be cured, rather than even think or talk about the idea that a woman may not be "happy" with her lot with men? Was lovesick really being LIFEsick?
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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