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BN Editor
Barbara
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Registered: ‎09-25-2006
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Recommended Reading

[ Edited ]
Untitled More Great Books from Lisa See

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
In nineteenth-century China, the women in one remote Hunan county developed their own secret code for communication: nu shu ("women's writing"). Some girls were paired with laotongs, "old sames," in emotional matches that lasted throughout their lives. With the arrival of a silk fan on which Snow Flower has composed for Lily a poem of introduction in nu shu, their friendship is sealed and they become "old sames" at the tender age of seven. As the years pass, through famine and rebellion, they reflect upon their arranged marriages, loneliness, and the joys and tragedies of motherhood. The two find solace, developing a bond that keeps their spirits alive. But when a misunderstanding arises, their lifelong friendship suddenly threatens to tear apart.

On Gold Mountain
When she was a girl, Lisa See spent summers in her family's antiques store in Los Angeles's Chinatown. There, her grandmother and great-aunt told her stories about their family's past. They spoke of how Lisa's great-great-grandfather emigrated from his Chinese village to the United States; how his son followed him, married a Caucasian woman, and despite great odds, went on to become one of the most prominent Chinese on "Gold Mountain" (the Chinese name for the United States). As an adult, See spent five years collecting the details of her family's remarkable history. She interviewed nearly one hundred relatives and pored over documents at the National Archives, the immigration office, and in countless attics, basements, and closets for the intimate nuances of her ancestors' lives.

The Flower Net
During the waning days of Deng Xiaoping's reign, the U.S. ambassador's son is found dead. Almost simultaneously, American officials find a ship adrift in the storm-churned waters off Southern California. No one is surprised to find the fetid hold crammed with hundreds of undocumented Chinese immigrants - the latest cargo in the Chinese mafia's burgeoning smuggling trade. What does surprise Assistant U.S. Attorney David Stark is his discovery that among the refugees lies the corpse of a Red Prince, a scion of China's political elite. Stark heads for Beijing to team up with police detective Liu Hulan, whose unorthodox methods are tolerated only because of her spectacular investigative abilities. Their investigation carries them into virtually every corner of today's China. And their work together also ignites their passion for each other - a passion forbidden by their respective governments and one that plays right into the hands of a serial killer.

The Interior
The Interior brings back the duo of Chinese police detective Liu Hulan and American attorney David Stark. This time, for Hulan, the case is alarmingly personal, unearthing her own buried past and a stunning network of violence and conspiracy. When an old friend from a village deep within China's interior asks Hulan to find out the truth about her daughter's suspicious suicide, Hulan cannot refuse - even if it means going undercover in a newly built American toy factory linked to David's firm and finding her way into the heart of a dangerous mystery. Meanwhile, David's new job has him trapped in a tangle of legal and ethical dilemmas. To extricate himself, he must first decide whom to trust and where his greatest duty lies.

Dragon Bones
When the body of an American archaeologist is found floating in the Yangzi River, Ministry of Public Security agent Liu Hulan and her husband, American attorney David Stark, are dispatched to Site 518 to investigate. As Hulan scrutinizes this death - or is it a murder? - David, on behalf of the National Relics Bureau, tries to discover who has stolen from the site an artifact that may prove to the world China's claim that it is the oldest uninterrupted civilization on earth. Everyone - from the Chinese government, to a religious cult, to an unscrupulous American art collector - wants this relic, and some, it seems, may be willing to kill to get it.

Message Edited by Barbara on 08-24-2007 10:19 AM
Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780887272066&itm=1

There is also a translation of the opera, Peony Pavillion available, as well as a DVD of a performance of it:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=014381021523&itm=1
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


rkubie wrote:
There is also a translation of the opera, Peony Pavillion available.



Oh, wow! I never would have imagined this was available! Thanks for letting us know.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: Recommended Reading



Fozzie wrote:

rkubie wrote:
There is also a translation of the opera, Peony Pavillion available.



Oh, wow! I never would have imagined this was available! Thanks for letting us know.




Yes, I saw that as well Fozzie on another book site. I thought that I would order it considering it seems to have some parallels in symbolism and themes so far. Too early for me to know: I am just on chapter two.

The fact that the opera is a Lincoln center production was what was even more remarkable to me.

Regards,

Bentley
Wordsmith
Fozzie
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Re: Recommended Reading



bentley wrote:


Yes, I saw that as well Fozzie on another book site. I thought that I would order it considering it seems to have some parallels in symbolism and themes so far. Too early for me to know: I am just on chapter two.

The fact that the opera is a Lincoln center production was what was even more remarkable to me.






I am hesitant to take on the book, fearing it may be too much like magical realism, which I don't are for. Lisa, could you tell us a little bit about the style of the writing? I assume that you have read it.

However, my library system does have a CD of 13 songs from the opera. I have requested that item and will let you all know what I think after I receive it and listen to it next week.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Author
LisaSee
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎08-24-2007
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Re: Recommended Reading



Fozzie wrote:


bentley wrote:


Yes, I saw that as well Fozzie on another book site. I thought that I would order it considering it seems to have some parallels in symbolism and themes so far. Too early for me to know: I am just on chapter two.

The fact that the opera is a Lincoln center production was what was even more remarkable to me.






I am hesitant to take on the book, fearing it may be too much like magical realism, which I don't are for. Lisa, could you tell us a little bit about the style of the writing? I assume that you have read it.

However, my library system does have a CD of 13 songs from the opera. I have requested that item and will let you all know what I think after I receive it and listen to it next week.





Reading the opera is quite hard. It's a bit like reading a play by Shakespeare -- the language is beautiful but sometimes it's hard to read and follow on the page. Seeing it is a different matter altogether. There is a two-hour DVD of the Lincoln Center production that's fantastic. (Two hours out of 25 is not much, but you get to see the costumes, the movement, dances, and the way they deal with the earthly world and the afterworld.)

I also wouldn't worry too much about the CD with the songs. Chinese opera is very, very different from western opera. A lot of people don't like Chinese opera at all. They find it kind of screechy and inaccesible. Of course, a lot of people don't like opera in any form. Still, I think it might be hard to listen to the CD and be able to visualize what's happening.

I realize all this sounds kind of negative. I don't mean it to. Read the opera! Watch the DVD! And listen to the CD!
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: Recommended Reading



LisaSee wrote:


Fozzie wrote:


bentley wrote:


Yes, I saw that as well Fozzie on another book site. I thought that I would order it considering it seems to have some parallels in symbolism and themes so far. Too early for me to know: I am just on chapter two.

The fact that the opera is a Lincoln center production was what was even more remarkable to me.






I am hesitant to take on the book, fearing it may be too much like magical realism, which I don't are for. Lisa, could you tell us a little bit about the style of the writing? I assume that you have read it.

However, my library system does have a CD of 13 songs from the opera. I have requested that item and will let you all know what I think after I receive it and listen to it next week.





Reading the opera is quite hard. It's a bit like reading a play by Shakespeare -- the language is beautiful but sometimes it's hard to read and follow on the page. Seeing it is a different matter altogether. There is a two-hour DVD of the Lincoln Center production that's fantastic. (Two hours out of 25 is not much, but you get to see the costumes, the movement, dances, and the way they deal with the earthly world and the afterworld.)

I also wouldn't worry too much about the CD with the songs. Chinese opera is very, very different from western opera. A lot of people don't like Chinese opera at all. They find it kind of screechy and inaccesible. Of course, a lot of people don't like opera in any form. Still, I think it might be hard to listen to the CD and be able to visualize what's happening.

I realize all this sounds kind of negative. I don't mean it to. Read the opera! Watch the DVD! And listen to the CD!




Thanks for the tips...I love opera so the DVD seems up my alley. Will look for it.
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: CD of Songs



Fozzie wrote:


However, my library system does have a CD of 13 songs from the opera. I have requested that item and will let you all know what I think after I receive it and listen to it next week.




I listened to the CD yesterday. I enjoyed hearing the different combinations of instruments that created the unique sound. The words had been translated into English. There were also some unusual noises during the songs, ones that sounded like dogs barking, a person laughing, and someone yelling something out. A couple of times I did a double take in my house, alone, wondering where the laughing person or the dog was.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: CD of Songs



Fozzie wrote:


Fozzie wrote:


However, my library system does have a CD of 13 songs from the opera. I have requested that item and will let you all know what I think after I receive it and listen to it next week.




I listened to the CD yesterday. I enjoyed hearing the different combinations of instruments that created the unique sound. The words had been translated into English. There were also some unusual noises during the songs, ones that sounded like dogs barking, a person laughing, and someone yelling something out. A couple of times I did a double take in my house, alone, wondering where the laughing person or the dog was.




Well that sounded like a strange experience (lol). Were those sounds just on your recording do you think?
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: CD of Songs


bentley wrote:


Fozzie wrote:


I listened to the CD yesterday. I enjoyed hearing the different combinations of instruments that created the unique sound. The words had been translated into English. There were also some unusual noises during the songs, ones that sounded like dogs barking, a person laughing, and someone yelling something out. A couple of times I did a double take in my house, alone, wondering where the laughing person or the dog was.




Well that sounded like a strange experience (lol). Were those sounds just on your recording do you think?



LOL! I have no idea! Here is a link to what I listened to:

http://music.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=074646165829&itm=10

None of the clips has the sounds to which I was referring, but tracks 6, 13, and 14 give a bit of a hint at what might be.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: CD of Songs



Fozzie wrote:

bentley wrote:


Fozzie wrote:


I listened to the CD yesterday. I enjoyed hearing the different combinations of instruments that created the unique sound. The words had been translated into English. There were also some unusual noises during the songs, ones that sounded like dogs barking, a person laughing, and someone yelling something out. A couple of times I did a double take in my house, alone, wondering where the laughing person or the dog was.




Well that sounded like a strange experience (lol). Were those sounds just on your recording do you think?



LOL! I have no idea! Here is a link to what I listened to:

http://music.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?z=y&EAN=074646165829&itm=10

None of the clips has the sounds to which I was referring, but tracks 6, 13, and 14 give a bit of a hint at what might be.





very funny and odd at the same time. lol
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

Gold Mountain sounds like a excellent book. I will try and order that if its not at the library. Has anyone else read it?
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