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Brad_W
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Your first classics

Mine was Mark Twain in elementary school.  I hated reading then, but enjoyed that book.  It wasn't until adulthood that revisited Mark Twain and his work.  It was like rekindling an old freindship.  I love the perspective he had on life and the ability even into old age to see the world through a child's eyes.  He had a great way of pointing out the absurdities we see, but I guess some haven't always "gotten" the humorous slant he put on that.

 

I especially love the 'Diaries of Adam and Eve'.  This is a timeless insight into the different perspectives of men and women, and love.

 

Brad 

With purpose and on purpose
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MsMorninglight
Posts: 80
Registered: ‎01-21-2008
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Re: Your first classics

[ Edited ]

My first classic was Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.  I received the book when I was 4 or 5 & though I couldn't read it yet, I felt so grownup having it & carried it with me everywhere I went.  I apparently tried to print my name on the inside cover with crayon. But, on that full page of letters, I see only one which was actually a letter in my name. :smileysurprised:   I think I mentioned on these boards somewhere, that I was a bit slow at learning to read, so I don't think I finally read it until I was about 11.  After that there was no stopping me. :smileyhappy: The first books I checked out of the library on my very first trip to a library in Jr. High were their edition's of Little Women & Joe's Boys.

 

I still have my Little Women. It's a slightly tattered 1955  modern abridged edition. And I treasure it.

 

 

Message Edited by MsMorninglight on 10-20-2008 09:31 AM



"Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind." - Henry James
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Lilo02
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎10-28-2008
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Re: Your first classics

My first classic was Anne of Avonlee, my 2nd was Sherlock Holmes and the Hound of the Baskervilles (which is my top favorite out of the series.) I enjoyed readying mysteries  up until this classic by Sir Arthur Conan Dole. The previous were the Boxcar Children series and Nancy Drew. I also had that brief period where I just gave up on reading books, but my reason was due to poor eyesight that nearly made me legally blind at some point. I just got scared after haveing to read one day and out of nowhere things started to go dark. That was because I never realized that I was reading under really poor lighting. Learned my lesson there. Once I started back up agian I realized that I have other particular interests and so I kicked up in the Religious category and went on from there learning that I have a strong passion for Bio's and History genre's (thats the kind of stuff that I used to read as a kid as well by the way.)

 

Now that I have 2 small nieces but no kids of my own. Both me and my sister have realized how important classical literature is and its something that we shouldn't forget. We both agree to setting both my sister's daughters up w/ classical literature like Anne of Green Gables, Nancy Drew/Hardie Boys/Boxcar Children series, The Secret Garden and many many more along that line. Although I'm not a fan of the Harry Potter books and the Stephanie Meyers Twilight Saga's, The Spiderwick Chronicles and the rest of them, these books will reach their classical highs in the next several years, there's no doubt about that. I just feel that todays young generation is slowly forgetting about the timeless classics that are out there. It doesn't even have to be the Anne of Green Gables or the Little Princess books or those that are for kids to read. What about titles like Emma and other Jane Austin books and the rest of those like Dostoyevski, Alexander Dumas, and all those guys?

"If it doesn't collect snow, or has not recently erupted, IT'S NOT A REAL MOUNTAIN!"
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FreeSpiritedHue
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-27-2008
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Re: Your first classics

I just feel that todays young generation is slowly forgetting about the timeless classics that are out there.

 

Lilo,

 

I'm not sure if I'm still considered a part of the "young generation" b/c I'm 25, but I do have to say there are a few select groups of people my age that I have found that specifically read the classics....the rest read other genres or just magazines - my point is, they do surprisingly read many books in general. There are even fewer people though in the still younger generations (kids that are teens right now) that read the classics at all - if they do, it's for a high school class they're taking and they grudgingly page through it, not absorbing any of it. Most of them are part of the technology explosion that has happened - VHS and Cassette tapes, "what are those?" they ask! Only having landline phones that are connected to the wall....unheard of! I think the only individuals that read the classics that are in high school are ones that their parents have passed down the importance of doing so, just like you and your sister are doing. I think as technology continues to advance and basically feed the "I need it now" ethics of the younger generations it is even more important to teach them about how much they can learn from any genre of books, especially classics. A classic is a book that has made it through decades, even centuries in some cases, still reaching each genereation of reader. They are able to connect w/ everyone and they can relate to the characters still.

 

As for my first classic, I think it was MacBeth, but I don't remember much about it b/c I really wasn't interested in the classics at that age. So, my first TRUE classic that I appreciated was the Count of Monte Christo. I started reading it after seeing the movie. I know books are always better than the movie, but I can't discredit it b/c it initiated my love for classics. Dumas wrote this classic in 1846 and I found it so well written that even in the 21st century I fully understood the language and the plot - now that's a great author! The next classic I read was JRR Tolkien's Hobbit and you probably can guess which book(s) I read next....that's right, The Lord of the Rings. I have since read it a total of three times b/c I just can't get enough of Tolkien's beautifully skilled way of weaving a story such as this trilogy! And yes, the book is 100 times over better than the movies! I a absolutely love the movies, but I'll take the book over it any day.

 

About six months ago I started a classical literature endeavor that will last for many years....I printed out the Easton Press' 100 greatest classics (it's now up to 125) and plan to read all of them. Hmmmm, if my calculations are right I'll be reading books for ....EVER! I would like to say thank you to Dumas for starting my love for classics and sending me on the best literary adventure yet!

 

** Be sure to check out B&N's "Classics" book club - it's excellent!

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Lilo02
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎10-28-2008
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Re: Your first classics


FreeSpiritedHue wrote:

I just feel that todays young generation is slowly forgetting about the timeless classics that are out there.

 

Lilo,

 

I'm not sure if I'm still considered a part of the "young generation" b/c I'm 25, but I do have to say there are a few select groups of people my age that I have found that specifically read the classics....the rest read other genres or just magazines - my point is, they do surprisingly read many books in general. There are even fewer people though in the still younger generations (kids that are teens right now) that read the classics at all - if they do, it's for a high school class they're taking and they grudgingly page through it, not absorbing any of it. Most of them are part of the technology explosion that has happened - VHS and Cassette tapes, "what are those?" they ask! Only having landline phones that are connected to the wall....unheard of! I think the only individuals that read the classics that are in high school are ones that their parents have passed down the importance of doing so, just like you and your sister are doing. I think as technology continues to advance and basically feed the "I need it now" ethics of the younger generations it is even more important to teach them about how much they can learn from any genre of books, especially classics. A classic is a book that has made it through decades, even centuries in some cases, still reaching each genereation of reader. They are able to connect w/ everyone and they can relate to the characters still.

 

As for my first classic, I think it was MacBeth, but I don't remember much about it b/c I really wasn't interested in the classics at that age. So, my first TRUE classic that I appreciated was the Count of Monte Christo. I started reading it after seeing the movie. I know books are always better than the movie, but I can't discredit it b/c it initiated my love for classics. Dumas wrote this classic in 1846 and I found it so well written that even in the 21st century I fully understood the language and the plot - now that's a great author! The next classic I read was JRR Tolkien's Hobbit and you probably can guess which book(s) I read next....that's right, The Lord of the Rings. I have since read it a total of three times b/c I just can't get enough of Tolkien's beautifully skilled way of weaving a story such as this trilogy! And yes, the book is 100 times over better than the movies! I a absolutely love the movies, but I'll take the book over it any day.

 

About six months ago I started a classical literature endeavor that will last for many years....I printed out the Easton Press' 100 greatest classics (it's now up to 125) and plan to read all of them. Hmmmm, if my calculations are right I'll be reading books for ....EVER! I would like to say thank you to Dumas for starting my love for classics and sending me on the best literary adventure yet!

 

** Be sure to check out B&N's "Classics" book club - it's excellent!


 

I started and finished reading Tolkein's LOTR trilogy about a year or so ago. Other than that I have never even heard of the guy. I remember it was during the time my folks were getting divorced when I was 17 years old, there was a lot of mental and emotional turmoil that I was dealing w/ haveing to fight to keep up in school, at the same time not being able to sleep, eat, and live in my own house for what almost felt like a whole month because my father was takeing forever packing up his stuff since the Protection Order came into action for his abusive behavior. My mothers boss was helping out w/ walking my mother through the entire divorce at the time since my mom can hardly speak any English and can only understand it correctly 70% of the time.  So in order to take my mind off of reality Carol would take me out to see movies w/ her. I first saw the trailer to The Fellowship of the Ring when I went to see the movie Dragonfly w/ Carol. I was blown away to a point where I didn't even know that I said out loud, "I HAVE GOT TO SEE THAT MOVIE!!!" thats when she leaned over to me and started telling me about J.R.R. Tolkein in which I was like "J.R.R WHO???" and then she was like "havent you read the Lord of the Rings Trilogy? The Fellowship of the Ring is the first book?" I was like "WHAT! this movie is based on some guys books? how come I never heard of all this?" so it was all excitement for me for the most part. Of coarse when I saw the first movie, I fell completely in love w/ it and couldn't wait till the next one came out and the one after that. Both the books and movies are my top favorite classics and I can't wait till The Hobbit comes out. 
"If it doesn't collect snow, or has not recently erupted, IT'S NOT A REAL MOUNTAIN!"
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scarlett77
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎08-25-2008
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Re: Your first classics

I just came across this post, as well. I started very early at about the age of five when I read Edgar Allen Poe, The Raven and The Pit and The Pendulem. Now that I think about it - that probably says a lot about me - reading Poe at 5... hmmmm  My Mom used to read to us from 101 Famous Poems and I loved The Raven so Mom got me a book of Poe. I still love him and my library is full of classics waiting to be read - so little time, so many books...
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JohnP51
Posts: 1,294
Registered: ‎12-31-2008
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Re: Your first classics

I was 10 and was sent to my room as punishment for something or other. It was too long ago for me to remember the reason but I'm sure I deserved it. My mother came to the door after a short while with some juice and a book that I could read during my "incarceration". It was The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,  by L. Frank Baum. Grudgingly, I read it and absolutely loved it. I've been hooked on books ever since then. Thanks Mom!
John

"Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else." ~ Mark Twain
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Bheriya
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-02-2009
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Re: Your first classics

When I was in the 5th grade, I remember my class being assigned to read Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart, which I think may have been the first classic I ever read. It was the darkest story I had read at that time, and I instantly fell in love with Poe and started to obsessively read all his other works and memorize his poems, at the expense of finshing my schoolwork. :smileyhappy:

 

He's still my favorite author, a full eight years later. I guess some tastes never change!

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Timbuktu2
Posts: 528
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Your first classics


JohnP51 wrote:
I was 10 and was sent to my room as punishment for something or other. It was too long ago for me to remember the reason but I'm sure I deserved it. My mother came to the door after a short while with some juice and a book that I could read during my "incarceration". It was The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,  by L. Frank Baum. Grudgingly, I read it and absolutely loved it. I've been hooked on books ever since then. Thanks Mom!
What a smart mom you have!  And a smart son she has!

 

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Timbuktu2
Posts: 528
Registered: ‎11-15-2008
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Re: Your first classics


Bheriya wrote:

When I was in the 5th grade, I remember my class being assigned to read Poe's The Tell-Tale Heart, which I think may have been the first classic I ever read. It was the darkest story I had read at that time, and I instantly fell in love with Poe and started to obsessively read all his other works and memorize his poems, at the expense of finshing my schoolwork. :smileyhappy:

 

He's still my favorite author, a full eight years later. I guess some tastes never change!


You just jogged my memory.  Fifth grade!  Jane Eyre!
 

 

lrg
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lrg
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎01-30-2007
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Re: Your first classics

I can't say that I was 5 years old when I read such and such or was otherwise reading before walking, etc., but some of these posts have jogged my memory a bit: Ivanhoe and Poe's works, throw in Macbeth for good measure, all sometime before starting junior high school. Recalling anything before that will take hypnosis.

 

A word about the posts of the "younger" generation's reading habits: I'm usually amazed how pop culture influences reading habits and vice-versa. You will find no complaints from me, however, as I find my nieces and nephews gobbling one series after another: Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Chronicles of Narnia, and now Twilight. Every birthday or other gift-giving occasion I'm sure to feed these reading habits to my nieces/nephews with as many of these books as I can lay my hands on (i.e. Twilight for Christmas). Personally, I'm glad to see them read these books with such enthusiasm and hope for better things to come.

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IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: Your first classics

Hi lrg,

Welcome to the board!

I agree with you: I think pop culture can be a heathly influence in the Literary with a capital L.  Shakespeare and Dickens wanted to attract the masses, too, after all.

 


lrg wrote:

I can't say that I was 5 years old when I read such and such or was otherwise reading before walking, etc., but some of these posts have jogged my memory a bit: Ivanhoe and Poe's works, throw in Macbeth for good measure, all sometime before starting junior high school. Recalling anything before that will take hypnosis.

 

A word about the posts of the "younger" generation's reading habits: I'm usually amazed how pop culture influences reading habits and vice-versa. You will find no complaints from me, however, as I find my nieces and nephews gobbling one series after another: Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, Chronicles of Narnia, and now Twilight. Every birthday or other gift-giving occasion I'm sure to feed these reading habits to my nieces/nephews with as many of these books as I can lay my hands on (i.e. Twilight for Christmas). Personally, I'm glad to see them read these books with such enthusiasm and hope for better things to come.


 




Ilana
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avidreader2
Posts: 143
Registered: ‎09-09-2008
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Re: Your first classics

Chronicles of Narnia. Then The Scarlet Pimpranel. Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Sense and Sensibility soon followed. The Lord of the Rings was next, then I moved to Count of Monte Cristo, The Time Machine, Call of the Wild, Black Beauty, and Around the World in 80 Days. I love classics. They are the foundation of modern literature and therefor deserve a great deal of attention and respect. Without them, I would be lost! Hahaha!
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mollify
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-10-2009
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Re: Your first classics

The Odyssey is the earliest classic that I remember reading when I was eleven at the start of my obsession with the ancient Greek world. Since then I have filled my life with classics such as This Side of Paradise, One Thousand and One Nights, Canterbury Tales, the Wizard of Oz, Beowulf, The Catcher in the Rye, The Call of the Wild, Antigone, To Kill a Mockingbird, Heart of Darkness, The Idiot, The Tale of Genji, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Gulliver's Travels, The Prince, Don Quixote, and all of Jane Austen's works except for Pride and Prejudice, which I have never been able to finish.