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Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

Dear twilightfreek08,

 

I did enjoy the movie. It was just something new for me. I was surprised about the things I hadn’t known before and yes, maybe a bit disappointed that the hero didn’t suck human blood, the way I had imagined vampires do. And….I don’t know if it is appropriate for an old lady to say that a young guy was hot, but yes, he looked hot.

 

You are right; I come from a different background, a different country, a different time. Not quite the 1800s, but the 20th century and a childhood spent in war time. During the war my parents and grandparents were forced to bring many of our books to a public place where they were burned. After the war we were not only hungry for food but also for new books. In 1949, for my eleventh birthday, my parents gave me a book about knitting. The first part. I had to wait a whole year before I got the second part on my twelfth birthday. I still have both books and still use them to make things. I guess I am a bit behind in the times, but in my defense, I am open to new experiences. That’s why I went to see Twilight.

 

Every generation has its heroes and every generation has favorites. I am glad you are reading so much, and I am glad you enjoy the movies. You have the advantages of new technologies and instant communication; have fun exploring all they have to offer.

 


twilightfreek08 wrote:
i have read all of the twilight saga. and love them! and btw i read them and then saw the movie! and what is so bad about a vampire not drinking human blood? and yes i am one of thoughs girls who thinks the robert( edward) is amazingly cute, but that NOT y i like the books/ movie. i like them because they are good. i just started the host and so far like it. almost every girl in my school has or is reading the saga. even some boys i can think of 3 just in my reading class. i liked it cuz i didnt want to put it down i read it in one day! s. meyer is a great wrighter and if you dont like twilight ur own loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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twilightfreek08
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎12-07-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

dear sunltcloud,

 it is not bad you said a young boy was hot because he is! and im very sorry you grew up in times of war.it is a good thing you are open to new things. and it is not a bad thing that the vamp didn't drink human blood, it is a good thing because all of the stories are avbout how they do drink human blood and animal blood is better because it shows that not all of them want to be "bad" and if they want to be "good" then so be it. im glade you enjoyed the movie it is really great. 

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twilightfreek08
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Re: Post-Twilight Movie thoughts


Everyman wrote:
I've heard Twilight referred to as a girl book, and girl movie.  Just wondering, are there boys who also like the book and/or movie?  If so, just a few, or many?

it is sorta a girl movie but when i went there were lots of guys there w/ or w/ out girlfriends. and i know 3-5 boys who have or are reading the series and like them. and if you like romace and buring passon like romeo and juleit then im happy it gose to show not all boys/guys are all about fighting and gore. yes there is some fighting but is mainly based around a vampire and a girl who fall in love but he is scared to be with her because she "smells good" to him so that dose cause problems but he is a lot stronger then he thinks around her after he gose huntting for over a week he can control him self around her and so then it just really takes off.

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!


Sunltcloud wrote:

 

You are right; I come from a different background, a different country, a different time. Not quite the 1800s, but the 20th century and a childhood spent in war time. During the war my parents and grandparents were forced to bring many of our books to a public place where they were burned. After the war we were not only hungry for food but also for new books. In 1949, for my eleventh birthday, my parents gave me a book about knitting. The first part. I had to wait a whole year before I got the second part on my twelfth birthday. I still have both books and still use them to make things. I guess I am a bit behind in the times, but in my defense, I am open to new experiences. That’s why I went to see Twilight.


 


 


Now that got me thinking. Would it be offensive to people if after a war or period ofsupression in which books were burned, if books were sent with care packages? Book donation drives for the survivors? 

We do as much for the troops, now. Just wondering.

Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

TiggerBear,

you are posing a good question. It has been debated among many who donate to humanitarian causes. I run into it on occasion because I knit teddy bears for children with HIV/Aids in Africa . What is more important, food, medicine, books, toys? No easy answer. I think it is up to the individual to decide, since everything is needed. My daughter has worked with "Big Brother Mouse" in Laos, distributing books to children who have never owned a book. But those books are carefully chosen for the age levels and they have to be in the language the child speaks. There is a library project in Kenya, the Camel Book Drive, I think they take all children's books. Also the African Library Project.

 

It is probably best to hook up with an agency that has experience with a particular country. I personally think it is also important to be neutral when giving books. No propaganda, no religious or political preferences. Probably the best way to help survivors would be to supply the finances to the writers, musicians, artisans, creative minds within the survivor community so they can rebuild their own cultural fabric. True, many in Germany spoke English when I grew up and would probably have been able to read a book sent in a care package by Americans. Others, like my mother, spoke French and would have been very disappointed if they had received an English version of a famous novel. No matter how much I might love Dante's Inferno, a Tibetan peasant would probably use it to start his yak turd fire. And what would be gained by sending a book of modern architecture to a Berber group living in Morocco?  Anyway, you get my point, but don't let me discourage you; thinking outside the box might produce something I haven't thought of and might bring great joy to a struggling survivor.

 

TiggerBear wrote:

Now that got me thinking. Would it be offensive to people if after a war or period ofsupression in which books were burned, if books were sent with care packages? Book donation drives for the survivors? 

We do as much for the troops, now. Just wondering.


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!


Sunltcloud wrote:

TiggerBear,

you are posing a good question. It has been debated among many who donate to humanitarian causes. I run into it on occasion because I knit teddy bears for children with HIV/Aids in Africa . What is more important, food, medicine, books, toys? No easy answer. I think it is up to the individual to decide, since everything is needed. My daughter has worked with "Big Brother Mouse" in Laos, distributing books to children who have never owned a book. But those books are carefully chosen for the age levels and they have to be in the language the child speaks. There is a library project in Kenya, the Camel Book Drive, I think they take all children's books. Also the African Library Project.

 

It is probably best to hook up with an agency that has experience with a particular country. I personally think it is also important to be neutral when giving books. No propaganda, no religious or political preferences. Probably the best way to help survivors would be to supply the finances to the writers, musicians, artisans, creative minds within the survivor community so they can rebuild their own cultural fabric. True, many in Germany spoke English when I grew up and would probably have been able to read a book sent in a care package by Americans. Others, like my mother, spoke French and would have been very disappointed if they had received an English version of a famous novel. No matter how much I might love Dante's Inferno, a Tibetan peasant would probably use it to start his yak turd fire. And what would be gained by sending a book of modern architecture to a Berber group living in Morocco?  Anyway, you get my point, but don't let me discourage you; thinking outside the box might produce something I haven't thought of and might bring great joy to a struggling survivor.

 

TiggerBear wrote:

Now that got me thinking. Would it be offensive to people if after a war or period ofsupression in which books were burned, if books were sent with care packages? Book donation drives for the survivors? 

We do as much for the troops, now. Just wondering.


 


Hmm Sounds like an Angel tree type thing would work, where a survivor requests the item to be donated. They could specify language.  They sign up (or someone does it for them), and get handed a book in the language of choice. There's got to be some where you can order books in something other than english.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

[ Edited ]

This exchange is one of the things that I love about the Internet generally, the BN Book clubs in particular, and Ilana's board even more specifically.

 

Here are two people apparently near opposite ends of life, from totally different backgrounds, meeting and exchanging thoughts.   What an extraordinary place this (this being meant in all senses) is!

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Dear twilightfreek08,

 

I did enjoy the movie. It was just something new for me. I was surprised about the things I hadn’t known before and yes, maybe a bit disappointed that the hero didn’t suck human blood, the way I had imagined vampires do. And….I don’t know if it is appropriate for an old lady to say that a young guy was hot, but yes, he looked hot.

 

You are right; I come from a different background, a different country, a different time. Not quite the 1800s, but the 20th century and a childhood spent in war time. During the war my parents and grandparents were forced to bring many of our books to a public place where they were burned. After the war we were not only hungry for food but also for new books. In 1949, for my eleventh birthday, my parents gave me a book about knitting. The first part. I had to wait a whole year before I got the second part on my twelfth birthday. I still have both books and still use them to make things. I guess I am a bit behind in the times, but in my defense, I am open to new experiences. That’s why I went to see Twilight.

 

Every generation has its heroes and every generation has favorites. I am glad you are reading so much, and I am glad you enjoy the movies. You have the advantages of new technologies and instant communication; have fun exploring all they have to offer.

 


twilightfreek08 wrote:
i have read all of the twilight saga. and love them! and btw i read them and then saw the movie! and what is so bad about a vampire not drinking human blood? and yes i am one of thoughs girls who thinks the robert( edward) is amazingly cute, but that NOT y i like the books/ movie. i like them because they are good. i just started the host and so far like it. almost every girl in my school has or is reading the saga. even some boys i can think of 3 just in my reading class. i liked it cuz i didnt want to put it down i read it in one day! s. meyer is a great wrighter and if you dont like twilight ur own loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Message Edited by Everyman on 12-12-2008 07:02 PM
_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

agreed.  thanks a lot for highlighting that.
Everyman wrote:

This exchange is one of the things that I love about the Internet generally, the BN Book clubs in particular, and Ilana's board even more specifically.

 

Here are two people apparently near opposite ends of life, from totally different backgrounds, meeting and exchanging thoughts.   What an extraordinary place this (this being meant in all senses) is!

 


Sunltcloud wrote:

Dear twilightfreek08,

 

I did enjoy the movie. It was just something new for me. I was surprised about the things I hadn’t known before and yes, maybe a bit disappointed that the hero didn’t suck human blood, the way I had imagined vampires do. And….I don’t know if it is appropriate for an old lady to say that a young guy was hot, but yes, he looked hot.

 

You are right; I come from a different background, a different country, a different time. Not quite the 1800s, but the 20th century and a childhood spent in war time. During the war my parents and grandparents were forced to bring many of our books to a public place where they were burned. After the war we were not only hungry for food but also for new books. In 1949, for my eleventh birthday, my parents gave me a book about knitting. The first part. I had to wait a whole year before I got the second part on my twelfth birthday. I still have both books and still use them to make things. I guess I am a bit behind in the times, but in my defense, I am open to new experiences. That’s why I went to see Twilight.

 

Every generation has its heroes and every generation has favorites. I am glad you are reading so much, and I am glad you enjoy the movies. You have the advantages of new technologies and instant communication; have fun exploring all they have to offer.

 


twilightfreek08 wrote:
i have read all of the twilight saga. and love them! and btw i read them and then saw the movie! and what is so bad about a vampire not drinking human blood? and yes i am one of thoughs girls who thinks the robert( edward) is amazingly cute, but that NOT y i like the books/ movie. i like them because they are good. i just started the host and so far like it. almost every girl in my school has or is reading the saga. even some boys i can think of 3 just in my reading class. i liked it cuz i didnt want to put it down i read it in one day! s. meyer is a great wrighter and if you dont like twilight ur own loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Message Edited by Everyman on 12-12-2008 07:02 PM

 




Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


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twilightfreek08
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎12-07-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

well glade to see we are all still alive. and i guess you ppl like to "talk" about me or just use my massages in replys. o well aside from that how is every one doing? hopefully good. sunltcloud i am really, really sorry for the whole 1800's coment, it was out of line.
Inspired Wordsmith
Sunltcloud
Posts: 933
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

No problem. In real life, at my age, I somtimes feel a bit ignored by young people who are outside my family and circle of friends and so, being addressed by a young person on the board, makes me feel that I am still a part of the conversation. 

 

There are things about the 1800s that are quite engaging and there are many people I would like to have a chat with, people like Abraham Lincoln, the Wright Brothers, Gregor Mendel, Marie Curie, Sigmund Freud, Mahatma Gandhi, Thomas Edison, Harriet Tubman, the Brontes, Winston Churchill, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B Anthony, Jane Austen, Florence Nightingale, George Elliot, Emily Dickinson, and many, many more. 

 

These people didn't have the advantage of making themselves known as invited guests in a Barnes and Noble group, but their names have survived generations of technologocical advancement and they surely know how to make me pay attention when I see their names at the library.  

 


twilightfreek08 wrote:
well glade to see we are all still alive. and i guess you ppl like to "talk" about me or just use my massages in replys. o well aside from that how is every one doing? hopefully good. sunltcloud i am really, really sorry for the whole 1800's coment, it was out of line.

 

Contributor
Kalie
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎12-14-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

Geez what haters.  I think twilight is AMAZING!  So what if it may be dangerous to fall in love with a vampire, you can't help who you love.  I think that every guy could learn something from Edward, he is my dream guy.  I also like that the vampires in Twilight to not follow the usual vampire stereotypes.  I think that they are without fangs and I like that they can go into the sunlight and don't sleep in coffins.  They are what vampires should be and I am sad that they are not real.

 

Kalie

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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!


Kalie wrote:

Geez what haters.  I think twilight is AMAZING!  So what if it may be dangerous to fall in love with a vampire, you can't help who you love.  I think that every guy could learn something from Edward, he is my dream guy.  I also like that the vampires in Twilight to not follow the usual vampire stereotypes.  I think that they are without fangs and I like that they can go into the sunlight and don't sleep in coffins.  They are what vampires should be and I am sad that they are not real.

 

Kalie


haters?!!? No! Where?

 

No haters, just a few people who never understood Vampires. Speaking of which, broaden your horisons, join us over in the paranormal group. Vampire lovers all around there.

Frequent Contributor
book-nut
Posts: 131
Registered: ‎11-25-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!


Everyman wrote:

This exchange is one of the things that I love about the Internet generally, the BN Book clubs in particular, and Ilana's board even more specifically.

 

Here are two people apparently near opposite ends of life, from totally different backgrounds, meeting and exchanging thoughts.   What an extraordinary place this (this being meant in all senses) is!

 


 

I agree with you 100% Everyman!  And another thing that interests me is how everyone has a story, of any age.  It is really fascinating to me to hear people's 'stories', especially elderly or older folks. I would love to write a book and just tell different people's 'stories'.  I don't know how well it would sell, but it would be interesting!  Another thing (it's a cliche) but it's wonderful how, when we all sit down and talk to each other, we find out how much we all have in common, though we seem to different.  That never ceases to amaze me.

~ book-nut

Frequent Contributor
book-nut
Posts: 131
Registered: ‎11-25-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!


Kalie wrote:

Geez what haters.  I think twilight is AMAZING!  So what if it may be dangerous to fall in love with a vampire, you can't help who you love.  I think that every guy could learn something from Edward, he is my dream guy.  I also like that the vampires in Twilight to not follow the usual vampire stereotypes.  I think that they are without fangs and I like that they can go into the sunlight and don't sleep in coffins.  They are what vampires should be and I am sad that they are not real.

 

Kalie


 

Haters?  No.  Open discussion is what these boards are about.  Please don't mistake that for 'hate'.  Just because someone has a different opinion from you doesn't mean they 'hate' you or what you stand for.

 

~ book-nut.

Inspired Contributor
Purpyl
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎12-06-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

I love vampires & I love reading series. I read Twilight because two of my friends at work loved it & had/were reading the rest of the books. I happened to have Twilight on one of my (many) bookshelves because my 29-year-old son gave it to me. ("I could only get half way through, Mom," he told me. "It's for teenage girls.") He was right. I could barely make it through & only persevered because my friends liked it so much -- and they are in their late 50's. No more Stephanie Meyers for me.

 

Cathy

 

CR: Love in the Time of Cholera

RR: The Tales of Beedle the Bard; Three Cups of Tea

 

So many books...

Distinguished Correspondent
Taylor-Marie
Posts: 117
Registered: ‎12-17-2008
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Re: Post-Twilight Movie thoughts

I've known quite a few boys who've read the series, but most of them were just wondering what the craze is all about.

 

And I'm wondering too.

 

I might be a teenaged girl....but I'm almost as boggled as most adults.

-------------------
My teachers tell me I daydream too much....I tell them they work too much.
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Taylor-Marie
Posts: 117
Registered: ‎12-17-2008
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

I still feel disappointed with the whole Twilight series. I often find myself talking to my friends at school and they'll be totally engrossed in the Jacob v. Edward battle. I still don't understand the obssesion with Edward, I highly doubt that if you met a vampire you would survive the encounter (They can't all be Edwards...)

As I said in my above post I'm just as confused as some adults about why so many girls treat Edward like the new Mr. Darcy. I guess they're infatuated with the idea of being forever young or bad-guys-gone-good. In the long run the book is an okay read, but too many girls clutch onto it like its the bible (Does anyone remember the twelve-year-old who was dead serious when she asked Pattinson to bite her neck?)

 

I'm going to find Rice now. She and I will always be best friends. Hah!

-------------------
My teachers tell me I daydream too much....I tell them they work too much.
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faceless372
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-30-2009
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

Hey there everyone! Am still very new here and contented to just read all the sometimes neutral, most time umm ... extremely 'passionate' views and comments. The 'mature' vs 'young' ones.

 

I for one have read Twilight the book and seen the movie. Initially, i was not much of a fan EVEN after i saw the movie. My interest however caught on after reading all these diversified views! heheh ...  Edward is "hot" (well, almost as sinfully cute as Brad Pitt in An Interview With a Vampire).

 

Seriously tho, i  think that Meyer didn't do such a good job in Twilight but the 'Romeo & Juliet' thingy certainly appealled to the younger generation. When it got on to the big screen, Hardwicke gave it life (and a gorgeous Edward, at that!). I think she delivered as best as she could tho of coz thru her own 'unique' version.

 

I think Teddybear sums it up best - Movies = merely fiction. Treat it such = no disappointment. You may even find it to be enjoyable ... :-) Cest la vie!

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snowflakeinannapolis
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

Ok, I guess I would be considered a "hater" - not of Vampires - just of Twilight.  Yes, I have read the books.  Sadly, all four of them.  As a previous poster suggested, the series starts of with promise but quickly devolves and gets worse with each book.  By the last book, there is an entire second half of the book that is unnecessary with characters that seem to come out of nowhere.

 

I also agree with others who have questioned the message in the books.  Co-dependent doesn't even begin to describe Edward and Bella.  Their relationship is unhealthy in the extreme.  I saw a glimmer of hope with the introduction of the Jacob Black character, but in the end, NONE of the characters have any consequences whatsoever for the choices they make and Meyers wraps everything up in a much to neat little bow.  Life just isn't like that.

 

Aside from the borderline dangerous message in the book for young girls (ie it's ok to set your self image by what some boy thinks of you and dangerous relationships are ok if it is "meant to be", etc....) the writing was elemantary at best. 

 

For those interested in some fine vampire literature I highly recommend Bram Stoker's Dracula and The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice.  I was in love with Lestat when I was younger, in spite of himself and all his flaws.

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Unbreakable3
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Re: "Twilight" My first vampire. Help me Ilana! Anybody? Set me straight!

I am not one of the screaming hordes of teenage girls that loves the Twilight series. I am older, 23, and while I love the series, I loved Meyer's adult novel almost more. It's a toss up. I think people here are missing the point. If vampires were real they could not walk around feasting on people and leaving gory scenes behind because we would know they were real. This takes your traditional vampire and says- What if? What if they were real, what if they were still kind of human, what if they fell in love with a human? What if they had a conscience? And then, when presented with the choice of a healthy human relationship or her one true soul mate, Bella turns her back on humanity for her soul mate. Just as Juliet did in Shakespeare's original tale of burning passion. Stephenie Meyer was born with a talent for making readers, a great deal of them at least, feel as though they are Bella or want to be. She doesn't deviate from the great writing no matter the subject. The movie was not even comparable. If you have seen the movie and are basing a decision or opinion about the books on that, don't. Read them. In addition, while they might not be quite as erotic as some of the True Blood scenes or Interview with A Vampire moments, there is alot to be said for wooing, for love that manifests itself so strongly that they wait three years until they are married for sex. That is the kind of moral that young girls today need in a heroine they can identify with.Bella pays a high price for choosing Edward, she gives up alot and he lives with guilt for it so they both pay a price. Nothing worth having comes free. 

Is Bella co dependent? Well, yes. I admit it. It is sort of an unhealthy relationship BUT she acknowledges that and the point is that she had a choice. If women want to have that kind of life then they have the choice nowadays. And the heroine of The Host is anything but the co dependent damsel in distress so read them or read The Host for some really good writing, a world I wish I lived in.