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Melissa_W
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An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump by Joseph Wright of Derby

Is it this one Laurel?

 

An Experiment on a Bird in An Air Pump

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Laurel
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Re: An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump by Joseph Wright of Derby

That's it, Melissa!

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Peppermill
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Re: 1818 Preface

This is from the Cliff Notes for Frankenstein:

 

"Shelley tells briefly how the novel came into being. During the wet and cool summer of 1816, in Geneva, Switzerland, several friends gathered to create and tell ghost stories. Percy Shelley mentions himself, Lord Byron, and Mary. He omits mention of Byron's mistress, Claire (Jane) Clairmont and of another guest, John William Polidori. Polidori later published his own Gothic novel, The Vampyre; a Tale (1819). This summer meeting produced two of the most important characters of English literature: the Frankenstein monster and the Vampire."  [Bold added.]

 

I haven't checked it, but was Polidori's tale really the origin of the Vampire in English literature?

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Letters I-IV

[ Edited ]

Was the passage Walton was seeking this one?

 

Adolf Nordenskiold's 1878  Northern Passage to the Pacific.   It is the one mentioned in the Cliff notes.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: Letter II

[ Edited ]

More from Cliff Notes:

 

"He alludes to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. This one poem helped launch the Romantic period and gives us a story of a man banished for killing an albatross while at sea. The poem is an extended allegory symbolizing the death of imagination in man and an embarkment on a quest for spiritual and intellectual knowledge. Coleridge, a Romantic writer, was a friend of Mary's father."

 

This is the 1798 version that Mary could have encountered prior to writing Frankenstein.

Unless you enjoy reading Old English, a more readable more readable version is here.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy