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Melissa_W
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PLAM: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

Please use this thread for discussion of Part 1 of Please Look After Mom.

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Fozzie
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Re: PLAM: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

I am just getting started on the book.  I have to say that this is the most unusual "voice" I have read before. It seems it is a narrator talking to a young woman about the young woman's mother.  Strange.  I haven't decided yet if I like it or not.

 

What do you think?

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Melissa_W
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Re: PLAM: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

Agreed.  It feels very removed, like I'm watching an interview per se.  I can't tell if that's a stylistic choice on the part of the author, or a cultural thing (I've never read a Korean author before), or if its an artifact of translation.


Fozzie wrote:

I am just getting started on the book.  I have to say that this is the most unusual "voice" I have read before. It seems it is a narrator talking to a young woman about the young woman's mother.  Strange.  I haven't decided yet if I like it or not.

 

What do you think?


 

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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chadadanielleKR
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Re: PLAM: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

As for me,  I got used to  this turn of speech,although it was a bit hard to follow it at first. It's like there is an invisible judge/narrator (us?) who's talking to the third of  mom's children, one of her daughters (1st part) . And then,  pages after pages some surprising secrets are disclosed like the fact that mom didn't know how to read (p.17).  Nevertheless, I agree, quite unusual!


Melissa_W wrote:

Agreed.  It feels very removed, like I'm watching an interview per se.  I can't tell if that's a stylistic choice on the part of the author, or a cultural thing (I've never read a Korean author before), or if its an artifact of translation.


Fizzier wrote:

I am just getting started on the book.  I have to say that this is the most unusual "voice" I have read before. It seems it is a narrator talking to a young woman about the young woman's mother.  Strange.  I haven't decided yet if I like it or not.

 

What do you think?


 


 

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streamsong
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: PLAM: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

I've just started this and I agree that the narrator style is  very different. Since each chapter is narrated by a different character, I wonder if this will continue.

 

The book promises to be a tear-jerker so far.

 

But I am enjoying the contrasts between "old" Korea of the mother--village life, not educated--and the daughter who is a successful writer, lives in a city and travels internationally.

 

My grandmother, born to an immigrant homesteading family, did not attend school. She could read, but her English writing was strictly phonetic. In many ways she reminds me of "Mom" in the story. She and my grandfather made sure that all their kids were educated, and those who wanted, went to college and had professional careers.

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
chadadanielleKR
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Re: PLAN: Part 1, "Nobody Knows"

Very interesting comment.

The more I read the book the more I feel sorry for the mother who almost belongs to the another civilization : the old pre-war traditional Korea whereas her children belong to a thriving educated westernized New World. Nowadays, such a situation is most probably very widespread, especially in "emergent" economy societies. .