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107Gerber
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15


pumpkin23 wrote:
When Silas found the little girl lying on the floor, he was filled with a sort of comfort that at one time had encompassed him.  I found this very interesting.  Looking as Silas before the event, I would have never thought him the man to become vulnerable towards a small child.  Also, the way he thought it to be his gold was in a sense philosophical.  Because though she wasn't his gold in the literal sense, he had found a treasure that could quite possibly keep him going.  Due to this, we may see a new man emerge, full of love and peace again.  The fact that a small child can have such an impact on his lonely life makes one ponder.

 

Isn't it all about his sister - the one he had carried through the streets?  He knew all along that he was capable of loving and caring for a child.
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Laurel
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Victorian children.


Choisya wrote:

These Victorian prints show idealised, innocent children as they were seen before the full onset of the Industrial Revolution


Choisya, I'm a real sucker for such pictures, as you would see if you came to my house. I have nicely framed prints of three of them--the top two on the right and "Waiting for Approval" down qite a way on the left. Just about all the pictures on the page are available as greeting cards from Victorian Papers.

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Megan456
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Yes, Pumpkin 23

I see what your saying about Silas not seeming to be willing to love a child, because of his lonely life and loss of his gold and what not.  I am really happy for Silas at this point. Up untill this part in the story I felt really bad for him and was just waiting for something like this to happen. This girl will definately have some effect on Silas in the story, I'm excited to see what he will do with the situation.

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Xerox75
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

i felt really touched by Silas' change in feelings.  He seemed really caring about this girl lying on the floor and at first I thought that he wouldn't really do anything about that situation.  But then he shows us that he really does care for her and shows us compassion between the girl and himself.

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Alaska14
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

I find it interesting how two of the events that changed Silas' life, he had no control over.  In the beginning of the story, Silas was framed for the robbery in Latern Yard by William Dane and now there is a little child in his house.  During both of these times, Silas had a fit where he was not aware of what was going on, and both of these events have significantly changed his life.  This just goes to show us that we sometimes have no control over our lives.
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Maximilien_Robespierre
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Silas taking care of Eppie is obviously the big topic in this section.  Of course this is important, but I'm going to change it up and talk about something different.  I found Nacey's rejection of Godfrey very interesting.  The beginning of the story made me believe that they both loved each other and I did not expect her to never want to marry him.  It was very surprising to me.  It's also strange how Nacey is a very beautiful girl, but doesn't ever want to get married to anyone.  This is extra strange for the time period in which the book takes place.  She seems like a very strong, independent woman and I think this is a good discussion to be started in the Literature by Women Bookclub.  I sense a very independent, self-relying woman in Nacey.  Do you too?

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Alaska14
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

I do like how quickly Silas decided to care for the little girl he found in his home.  It is almost like Silas needs this little child in his life, and he does.  He has found someone to raise and care for.  This will help the plot grow and change and hopefully help Silas get over his lost gold.  
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Maximilien_Robespierre
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

To Alaska14:

Not only do we not have control over our lives at times, but we also have no control over other peoples' lives and decisions.  Events that happen to us can catch us off guard.  What other people do can also catch us off guard.  Silas surprised everyone by deciding to keep and take care of Eppie.  No one in the story imagined something like that would happen.  Life is unpredictable, but that's what makes it great.

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Megan456
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

I'd just like to bring up that in last week's discussion it was mentioned that the purpose of Eliot always interrupting the plot was to teach a lesson. I don't know if i just happened to miss it, but i haven't notcied any lesson being taught in the random parts of the novel that don't do anything for the plot. I really do think it is just an interruption of what is really important in the plot. It seems, thankfully, that thease interruptions have come to an end once Silas finds Eppie. Up untill this point I had a hard time getting though the book. It seems like the good part of the story has just begun.

Another thing I'd like to bring up is the part in Chapter 13 when Silas first finds Eppie. He says something like "its a lone thing-I'm a lone thing" I really like how he connects himself with the child in that moment. It shows how much he loves the little girl already, even though he just found her. When I read that I immediately thought of the girl being like a replacement for his gold, and I noticed later in the book that very thought was mentioned.

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Peppermill
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15


Maximilien_Robespierre wrote:

Silas taking care of Eppie is obviously the big topic in this section.  Of course this is important, but I'm going to change it up and talk about something different.  I found Nacey's rejection of Godfrey very interesting.  The beginning of the story made me believe that they both loved each other and I did not expect her to never want to marry him.  It was very surprising to me.  It's also strange how Nacey is a very beautiful girl, but doesn't ever want to get married to anyone.  This is extra strange for the time period in which the book takes place.  She seems like a very strong, independent woman and I think this is a good discussion to be started in the Literature by Women Bookclub.  I sense a very independent, self-relying woman in Nacey.  Do you too?


Maximilian -- I haven't traced this or studied it closely, but I rather wondered if there wasn't a lot of George Sands in the character of Nancy -- a strong woman, who liked to think she was considerate of others, but under it all, was quite capable of manipulating the world to her own way -- a way which was, after all, quite compassionate and full of life, as well as knowing sadness and some regrets.

 

At times, both Nancy Lammeter and Mary Ann Evans (George Eliot) seem to use reason to override what the heart might say, yet neither is without heart. (Nancy example:  dressing the same as her sister -- it may seem like a nice sisterly thing to do, but was it very kind in its  implimentation, despite Nancy's protestations that she would have followed her sister's lead?)

 

This article may be more confusing than enlightening, but it does touch on the relationship of George Eliot to her female characters.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Megan -- for some thoughts on the impact of the narrator voice, type and tone on the story, you might find the comments here of interest, whether you agree with them or not.

 


Megan456 wrote {excerpt}:

I'd just like to bring up that in last week's discussion it was mentioned that the purpose of Eliot always interrupting the plot was to teach a lesson. I don't know if i just happened to miss it, but i haven't notcied any lesson being taught in the random parts of the novel that don't do anything for the plot. I really do think it is just an interruption of what is really important in the plot. It seems, thankfully, that thease interruptions have come to an end once Silas finds Eppie. Up untill this point I had a hard time getting though the book. It seems like the good part of the story has just begun.

 


"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Lasairia_Conway
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15


Maximilien_Robespierre wrote:

Silas taking care of Eppie is obviously the big topic in this section.  Of course this is important, but I'm going to change it up and talk about something different.  I found Nacey's rejection of Godfrey very interesting.  The beginning of the story made me believe that they both loved each other and I did not expect her to never want to marry him.  It was very surprising to me.  It's also strange how Nacey is a very beautiful girl, but doesn't ever want to get married to anyone.  This is extra strange for the time period in which the book takes place.  She seems like a very strong, independent woman and I think this is a good discussion to be started in the Literature by Women Bookclub.  I sense a very independent, self-relying woman in Nacey.  Do you too?


I also found Nancy's rejection peculiar. Although she is fairly irritated by Godfrey's sudden want to be near her at the party, she still doesn't like being ignored by him. In the beginning of the novel, I was under the impression that Nancy thought kindly of Godfrey, but he wouldn't propose do to his secret marriage to Molly. Whenever the Gunn's sisters, girls not "trapped" in the isolated Raveloe, comment on her "rustic beauty" and Nancy didn't really think much of it, I began to see her in a different light. Despite her beauty, she is not vain nor is she anything a lady should have been back then. Her hands are calloused, she is unpolished and often speaks vulgarly. Most importantly, Nancy is stubborn. She hopes to alter the feelings she still has for Godfrey by inisting that his character is weak. As you said, she seems rather independent, it makes me wonder how this will all turn out.

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Lasairia_Conway
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

I find the fact that the failure and selfishness of certain characters change Silas so much fascinating. In the beginning, he is betrayed by his friend, but loses his faith, bride, trust in people, people's trust and the only home he ever knew. In order to escape the misery of a former life, he buries himself in gold and work. The old weaver becomes isolated and distrusted by the fellow townspeople in Raveloe, just as those in his previous village had. Then, Dunsy, also selfish scum, steals the gold that was his console for many years. Like a ghost, Silas bewails and appears in Rainbow, seeking what was his life. Now, Molly's long walk for revenge gave him a daughter. The miser cares nothing of gold, and sees this frightened child as the greatest treasure of all. Also, Silas's faith is resurrected, he is no longer an apparation that appears occasionally, but someone the townspeople trust and want to help. It is as if Dunsy's greed, and Molly's folly were actually the best things to happen to Silas because they gave him Eppie.

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AnneBoleyn
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Robespierre:

She is an interesting character and a good topic of dicsussion. I think she is a multifaceted individual. You can easily relate to her in some aspects, but she can also be quite mysterious. In part 2, I expect to learn much more about her, and I'm anxious to see how her character develops later in the novel.

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AnneBoleyn
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Today, a man would have quite a difficult time trying to prove that he should be allowed to care for an orphaned baby girl, especially because the townspeople were already suspicious of him. It is just a show of how times have changed. In the story, there were a few people who were skeptical of his child care skills, but he gained gaurdianship of the child without having any real difficulties. Nowadays, it would take years to sort out who had rights to the child. Many would think that he was interested in the child in a different way, because he became so protective of her right away. I wonder whether he would have been given guardianship of Eppie, if the story had taken place in modern day.
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mgennocro
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

    Well I caught up to whaere we are supposed to be now, and I'm glad I am.  Alot happens in chapters 10-15.  The section about the party was hard to get through, as our teacher said, but the rest went smoothly.  I could not have ever predicted that Godfrey's wife was actually going to travel to the Red House and tell his father what his son had done.  Even more suprising was when she died on the way.  At this I found myself somewhat relieved for Godfrey.  Although it may not be highly moral, I was glad he would not have to worry about her anymore.  As for Silas and the child, I'm glad he has taken it upon himself to care for it.  His life has been filled with disaster after disaster and it is about time something good happens to him.  He has a reason for living again and we witness major changes in his outlook and actions from the beginning of the story.  He returns to doing some of the things from his past and starts to become a little more involved with the community.  His future with Eppie looks bright and I hope his toubles are comming to an end.
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mgennocro
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Well Max you make a good point.  It's good to take a look at this section from a different way.  I too was under the impression that Nacey shared in Godfrey's feelings.  The fact that she doesn't came as a bit of a shock, and I agree with your description of her.  I believe this twist will make the following chapters quite interesting and I wonder what will happen between them. 
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MarieANGtoinette
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

pumpkin23,

Silas is much better off with the loss of his money, because i think he can come to realize what it is to actually love something. I think it will show him that his money wasn't really worth much at all. What is really important to him will present itself in a way most readers including myself probably wouldnt expect from Silas.  I agree that we will see a softer side of him. An extreme transition will undergo in the soul of Silas.  His misfortune is now turning around into another fortune, a fortune you cant put a price on.

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jcnapoleon
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

In my readings of the next section of the book, I found in chapters 12 and 13 a very interesting point. Silas Marner has been made out to be a man who can care for nothing and is out of touch with society. In the earlier chapters of the book it was hinted that Silas could not remember thoughts or memories. In these last chapters though he is talking to Dolly and mentions he went to chapel. Now he is relating Godfrey's child to his sister, who died in his childhood. He has also taken responsibilty for her and is reluctant to give her to the ladies at the party. This is a big step form the beginning of the book when he was nothing but a loomist twenty-four seven. He is showing signs of being in touch with reality now. This leads me to believe that when Dunsley stole his gold he may have done him a favor. I think he is showing signs of a good person and will come around.

 

Do you?

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jcnapoleon
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 2, Part I, Chapters 10 - 15

Maximilien, I though the same way about the situation between Nancy and Godfery. I though that they were in love with each other and were on the same page. This came as a big suprise when Nancy was trying to avoid him. It seems like she has had a dirastic change of mind with their situation. Maybe she is tired of waiting for him to make a decision and tell his father. Either way she is now a hard as a rock and does not even want to get married and their must be a catch. This book skips from one place to another and I think that it will be back to this situation very soon.