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Melissa_W
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SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

Please use this thread for continued discussion of Silas Marner, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob."  This is a spoiler-friendly thread. :smileyhappy:

 

Text of "The Lifted Veil" at Project Gutenberg.

Text of "Brother Jacob" at Project Guetnberg.

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Megan456
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

While somewhat dull in the beginning I found Silas Marner as a whole to be a toutching and also entertaining novel. Now that we're aloud to talk about all parts of the book I'd just like to say how surprized I was for the happy ending.  At the beginning of the novel it seemed as though Silas could not get his happy ending. First with his friend's deceit and them with his stolen gold. In the second part of the novel I was just a little surprised that everything seemed to turn out okay. I was toutched by the ending though and I'm happy it ended on a good note. Its always nice when you see the characters you got to know through the book content in the end.
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107Gerber
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

As much as I like Silas Marner, I hesitated to read "The Lifted Veil", thinking its brevity might limit it to be some heavy handed, moralistic, sermonizing, .... well, you get it.  But it was not that at all!  What a pleasant little surprise it is.  Why hasn't this been made into a movie?  Or, perhaps it has?  I was quite surprised by the step outside reality.  For this author, who seems so grounded in letting us know that our behavior will lead us to a justified end, this was a real leap.  I had a great deal of curiosity right from the start, with the charachter's apparent knowledge of how, when, where his life would end reeling me in right away.  The character's admission of small mistakes making people view him as odd or somehow charmed was so entertaining.  And the medical scene at the end!  Wonderful.  Ann Rice could not have done better.  Frankenstein's efforts to bring his creature to life was less vivid in my reader's eye than this.  Am I expressing this strongly enough?  Loved it!!!
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koppie11
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

107Gerber,

I too was very doubtful in reading "The Lifted Veil," even after your excited remarks of its excellence, but, I found it great.  It was very confusing, but it was supposed to be, making us think the entire story.  Right off the get go, Elliot confuses us, and keeps confusing us more and more, until eventually, he starts to explain it all to us, and it was great.  I found the entire Bertha situation a very odd incident between Lameter and Alfred, but it added a lot to the character of Lameter.  Over all, this was a great story.

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koppie11
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

"The Lifted Veil," I did not know what to think when I picked it up, but I was shocked.  After Silas Marner's slow opening, I was wondering how Eliot's short stories would be.  I thought she will spend forever introducing the characters and there will be nothing interesting.  I was wrong.  She confuses us, but keeps it so interesting, I read it in one sitting!  Great story.

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Xerox75
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

Silas Marner was a very interesting book to read even though the beginning seemed a little boring at first for me.  But once I got into more of the plot, everything started to unfold and flow better.  I did feel that there were some elements of humor, but sometimes I needed to read a section again to understand it better.  But once I did, it just seemed to make sense after a few chapters.  And watching the chararcters reveal themselves throughout the story also helped me understand the plot and storyline even more.  All together, this was a great book and I encourage anyone to read it.

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Everyman
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

For those whose books don't contain The Lifted Veil, here it is
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Laurel
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

Thanks, E. I read "The Lifted Veil" last night. (Actually, the little man in my new reading machine read it to me.) If I had not known it was by George Eliot, I would have guessed Nathaniel Hawthorne.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Melissa_W
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Marner and Fables

A number of papers about Silas Marner mention that it has a fable-like structure.  Does that make sense to you?  Which fable or fairy tale does SM remind you of?  How many times in the novel does Eliot refer to fairy tales?
Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Laurel
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Re: Marner and Fables

Hmm. There's "Rumplestiltskin" with a nice switch.

 

"Goldilocks" goes to the bear's house and falls asleep.

 

Certainly "Cinderella."

 

Fables usually have morals, and the moral of this tale is "Be sure your sins will find you out."

 


pedsphleb wrote:
A number of papers about Silas Marner mention that it has a fable-like structure.  Does that make sense to you?  Which fable or fairy tale does SM remind you of?  How many times in the novel does Eliot refer to fairy tales?

 

 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: Marner and Fables

I can see the point.  Functional orphan (as far as we know Silas has no parents or family) is unfairly treated (Cinderella, others) and wanders out into the world (Riding Hood, Hansel and Gretel, many others) and lands in a lonely place.  Something bad happens to him (many tales again), but a good fairy (good fairies are always blond, aren't they?) comes along and his virtue triumphs, and he lives happily ever after.  Meanwhile the bad dude is eventually found out and is punished for his badiess. 

 

When you look at the bare bones, it is pretty fable like.  But then, aren't a whole lot of books?  


pedsphleb wrote:
A number of papers about Silas Marner mention that it has a fable-like structure.  Does that make sense to you?  Which fable or fairy tale does SM remind you of?  How many times in the novel does Eliot refer to fairy tales?

 

 

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Everyman
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Re: Marner and Fables

Fables usually have morals, and the moral of this tale is "Be sure your sins will find you out."

 

But the moral also is, love will win out in the end.  Or, good people will wind up happy.  

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Melissa_W
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Re: Marner and Fables

That's very true.  (I am reduced to rediculous giggles because you used "bad dude" in your post - for some reason it strikes me a terribly funny :smileyvery-happy: )


Everyman wrote:

 

When you look at the bare bones, it is pretty fable like.  But then, aren't a whole lot of books?  

 

Melissa W.
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pumpkin23
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

After finishing this book, I can honestly say it was one of the most difficult stories to read.  This was due to GE's rich vocabulary and her way of teaching a lesson.  Though I found it difficult, I also found it intruiging and entertaining.  It definitely caught my attention when everything turned for the better in the second half of the book, and I was relieved to learn that everything worked out for Silas.  All in all, I would recommend this book to others because though it is a tough read, it is worth every second.

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Laurel
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Re: Marner and Fables

I see Eppie more as the main character in the fairy tales: Goldilocks wandering to the cottage of the old bear and falling asleep; Cinderella becoming a beautiful princess; Riding Hood or Gretel in peril. Silas is more the Papa Bear, the wolf, the funny little man; but his end is better than his beginning.

 

Yes, many books are fables, but many are not as didactic as this one.


Everyman wrote:

I can see the point.  Functional orphan (as far as we know Silas has no parents or family) is unfairly treated (Cinderella, others) and wanders out into the world (Riding Hood, Hansel and Gretel, many others) and lands in a lonely place.  Something bad happens to him (many tales again), but a good fairy (good fairies are always blond, aren't they?) comes along and his virtue triumphs, and he lives happily ever after.  Meanwhile the bad dude is eventually found out and is punished for his badiess. 

 

When you look at the bare bones, it is pretty fable like.  But then, aren't a whole lot of books?  


pedsphleb wrote:
A number of papers about Silas Marner mention that it has a fable-like structure.  Does that make sense to you?  Which fable or fairy tale does SM remind you of?  How many times in the novel does Eliot refer to fairy tales?

 

 


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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pumpkin23
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

Megan456:

 

Just like you said, I was also surprised at the way things turned for the better.  Watching the characters evolve through thick and thin was entertaining, and I was happy with how things turned out.  At the beginning, I wouldn't have expected this happy ending, but after reading it, everything molded and formed to lead up to the way the story was told.  This novel was very intruiging, as well as touching.

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Alaska14
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

"The Lifted Veil" was a very neat story.  After hearing my teacher tell everyone how good it was, I decided to give it a try.  It was a little confusing at first, even now I am not positive if a couple of events happened or not but, it was still very cool to read.  For me to read it and understand it, I felt like I had to peel away the words to see the story underneath, but it was also cool how GE told the story directly to the reader.  The plot kept the reader interested the whole time and it was unperdictable.  When I could tell something was going to happen, I tried to guess what it was but, the thing that actually happened was something completely different.  The short story was just as interesting, if not more interesting than the whole book.
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Alaska14
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Re: Marner and Fables

It is interesting to be able to see fariy tales in most stories and if you look hard enough I am sure you could find them.  Fairy tales are meant to teach lessons and in any good book, for me anyway, there is a lesson to be learned, a story to be told, and a challenge to overcome. 
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jcnapoleon
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

After reading this book I have a new outlook on classical literature. Having not read much of it and not being a big fan of what I had read, I was not excited about reading this book. I was amazed though at the techniques she used to keep the readers attention. She seemed to just skip form plot to plot in the first few chapters but then brought it all together in the last five chapters. The twists and hardships that were faced b y Eppie, Silas, Godfrey, and Dunsly made the book hard to put down when it all came together. I was also amazed on how George Elliiot was trying to express her thoughts on women in this book. She made points to single out things that she disagreed with in the life and roles of women. This was brilliant, it was a way to put a different thought into a womens head without being reprimanded for it. Overall I thought the book was great, and I now understand why it is noted as one of the best novels of all time.
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Maximilien_Robespierre
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Re: SILAS MARNER: Week 4, more Silas, "The Lifted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"

To Xerox75:

I respect your opinion, but I found the story completely opposite.  I thought the beginning was action packed and very interesting.  The beginning had tons of small conflicts and drama, but once I got into the plot more everything slowed down.  There was only one conflict at a time and it didn't keep me interested in what was going on and I wasn't really curious what was going to happen next.