Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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debbook
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Say Goodbye to Heathcliffe!

Maybe now there will be less star vehicles (read: bad movies) and more good movies out there not pandering to the celebrities.

Choisya wrote:
...and Hello to the New Man.

 

A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
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Peppermill
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Welcome to the LbW Common Room!

While we are still thinking about bells:

 

 

Edgar Allen Poe:  "The Bells"

 

 

(Includes an early version and a bit of history as well as the final poem.)

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Nuns of the 17C.

[ Edited ]

(Thanks P - very appropriate poem!)

 

 

I think folks here will like this BBC Radio 4 interview with the author Sarah Dunant,  talking about her new novel Sacred Hearts about convent life in Renaissance Italy.  The interview includes some beautiful choral music by the Singing Sirens of Musica Secreta, based on a nun's ensemble of the 17C.  

 

The BBC also produced a short play based on the book.
This might be a book worth nominating for one of our future reads?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 06-30-2009 02:34 AM
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debbook
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Lost in Austen

C, since you were the first one to introduce me to it, I just wanted to let you know that the DVD for "Lost in Austen" arrives tomorrow. I was starting to get addicted on YouTube, but then they pulled it. I didn't realize it would be released on DVD and was so excited when I found out.
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: A French authoress, well translated

[ Edited ]

Has anyone here read The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery?

 

I just finished it and have yet to decide whether to be entranced or amused, or simply both.  Perhaps bemused (3) would be the appropriate word.

Message Edited by Peppermill on 06-30-2009 09:03 PM
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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debbook
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: A French authoress, well translated

I have that book, Pepper and have started it but then put it down to finish up some library books. I read so many good reviews of it I decided to try it. I like what I have read so far. I am home all week from work and am hoping to get back to it after I finish some others. Maybe I won't go back to work until I catch up on my reading,lol.  Nope, can't afford to take 2 years off work, plus all the great books that will keep coming out, maybe it's not possible to ever catch up!

Peppermill wrote:

Has anyone here read The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery?

 

I just finished it and have yet to decide whether to be entranced or amused, or simply both.  Perhaps bemused (3) would be the appropriate word.

Message Edited by Peppermill on 06-30-2009 09:03 PM

 

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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: A French authoress, well translated

Deb -- two years wouldn't do it!  That's from someone who certainly thought it would, over five years later!

 

Enjoy your break this next week.  (I did enjoy Elegance... , even if my bottom line assessment is still mixed.)  Pepper

 


debbook wrote:
I have that book, Pepper and have started it but then put it down to finish up some library books. I read so many good reviews of it I decided to try it. I like what I have read so far. I am home all week from work and am hoping to get back to it after I finish some others. Maybe I won't go back to work until I catch up on my reading,lol.  Nope, can't afford to take 2 years off work, plus all the great books that will keep coming out, maybe it's not possible to ever catch up!

Peppermill wrote:

Has anyone here read The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery?

 

I just finished it and have yet to decide whether to be entranced or amused, or simply both.  Perhaps bemused (3) would be the appropriate word.



 

 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Lost in Austen

I hope you enjoy it Debs - it is very quaint:smileyhappy:.  

 

 


debbook wrote:
C, since you were the first one to introduce me to it, I just wanted to let you know that the DVD for "Lost in Austen" arrives tomorrow. I was starting to get addicted on YouTube, but then they pulled it. I didn't realize it would be released on DVD and was so excited when I found out.

 

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dulcinea3
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Lost in Austen

[ Edited ]

Choisya wrote:

I hope you enjoy it Debs - it is very quaint:smileyhappy:.  

 

 


debbook wrote:
C, since you were the first one to introduce me to it, I just wanted to let you know that the DVD for "Lost in Austen" arrives tomorrow. I was starting to get addicted on YouTube, but then they pulled it. I didn't realize it would be released on DVD and was so excited when I found out.

 


 

I hadn't heard of this before.  It looks cute - I like Jemima Rooper, and I think that Gemma Arterton played Tess in the recent production.  I have a book called Lost in Austen, which is an interactive story where you get to choose the path that you take.  I doubt that there is any connection, although it does sound like the main character here is choosing the path and altering the story, too.  But the book brings in elements from all of the novels, as well as Austen's true life.

 

Lost in Austen 

 

 

Lost in Austen  
Message Edited by dulcinea3 on 07-01-2009 09:41 AM
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debbook
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Lost in Austen

Dulcie, from what I saw before You Tube shut it down, it was quite funny! I checked out the book Lost In Austen, but I don't like the idea of choosing a path in a book. I want the author to take me there.

dulcinea3 wrote:

Choisya wrote:

I hope you enjoy it Debs - it is very quaint:smileyhappy:.  

 

 


debbook wrote:
C, since you were the first one to introduce me to it, I just wanted to let you know that the DVD for "Lost in Austen" arrives tomorrow. I was starting to get addicted on YouTube, but then they pulled it. I didn't realize it would be released on DVD and was so excited when I found out.

 


 

I hadn't heard of this before.  It looks cute - I like Jemima Rooper, and I think that Gemma Arterton played Tess in the recent production.  I have a book called Lost in Austen, which is an interactive story where you get to choose the path that you take.  I doubt that there is any connection, although it does sound like the main character here is choosing the path and altering the story, too.  But the book brings in elements from all of the novels, as well as Austen's true life.

 

Lost in Austen 

 

 

Lost in Austen  
Message Edited by dulcinea3 on 07-01-2009 09:41 AM

 

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laceyjane
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Welcome to the LbW Common Room!

I'm a newbie to the whole book club thing, so I'm not sure if this is the proper place to suggest a possibility for a future book, but I'm going to go ahead and suggest it here and hope for the best! Haha :smileyvery-happy:

I think it would be great to read a novel by Ayn Rand. I've already read two of her novels, (The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged), but would be more than willing to read either one of them again. I think that they would make for some good discussion, because Ayn Rand has a controversial way of thinking.

If we are looking for books that have other media tie-ins, then we would want to go with The Fountainhead. There was a movie made of this novel. However, the book commonly referred to as her "masterpiece" is Atlas Shrugged.

She has also written some non-fiction pieces.

-Lacey
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LbW reading selections

This is a good thread in which to throw ideas around :smileyhappy:

 

Reading selections here in LbW are a little different than some of the other forums/groups.  About three times a year, I ask for nominations, then create a "shortlist" based on those noms.  BNBC users vote and then I take the 4 or 5 most popular titles as our next selections.  Reminds me - we have a nom/voting period coming up over the next two weeks (note to self - make new threads).

 

So keep the Rand titles handy when I ask for nominations and be prepared to talk it up - our current selection was the selection with the most votes in our last go-round thanks to Ryan's arm-twisting cheerleading :smileytongue:.


laceyjane wrote:
I'm a newbie to the whole book club thing, so I'm not sure if this is the proper place to suggest a possibility for a future book, but I'm going to go ahead and suggest it here and hope for the best! Haha :smileyvery-happy:

I think it would be great to read a novel by Ayn Rand. I've already read two of her novels, (The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged), but would be more than willing to read either one of them again. I think that they would make for some good discussion, because Ayn Rand has a controversial way of thinking.

If we are looking for books that have other media tie-ins, then we would want to go with The Fountainhead. There was a movie made of this novel. However, the book commonly referred to as her "masterpiece" is Atlas Shrugged.

She has also written some non-fiction pieces.

-Lacey


 

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Peppermill
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Re: LbW reading selections

[ Edited ]

 


pedsphleb wrote [excerpt]:

This is a good thread in which to throw ideas around :smileyhappy:



I am playing with nominating one of these and would like feedback on interest within the group:

 

Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

 

 

Silko is apparently one of the few if not the only Native American Indian female writer whose works have been critcally reviewed in other books dedicated specifically to her or a writing of hers.  (Laguna Pueblo tribe)

 

 

 

 

 

The Grass Dancer by Susan Power

 

Harvard-trained, Standing Rock Sioux writer who has been "silent" on the book-publishing front for awhile after this 1995 debut winner of the PEN/Hemingway award and her 2002 collection of short stories Roofwalker.  

 

 

 

 

 

 I remember fallen Trees by Elizabeth Cook-Lynn

 

A risky proposal -- a book of poems that I haven't personally read.

 

"This generous collection of her poems will undoubtedly be as controversial as her previous book of essays, Why I Can't Read Wallace Stegner and Other Essays  (Wisconsin, 1996); but her bold satires and eloquent lyrics are hardly likely to be misunderstood. In this work, without casting aside the mantle of a foremost scholar of Indian history and current cultural affairs (she is editor of the eminent Wicazo Sa Review), Ms. Cook-Lynn joyfully and courageously embraces the people and the world she knows and loves: scolds their detractors, scarifies their enemies, sings and dances with them, loves them as much for their sins as for their virtues; venerates them. Thus through her sorrowful, mocking, searing indignation, we participate in her celebration of the indestructible human spirit." (Crow Creek Lakota Sioux)

 

 

The Plague of Doves by Louise Erdrich

 

We considered this before; it is now available in paperback. 

 

I listened to its recording; it is a complicated tale of community and family tribulations and trials and interweavings.

 

["an enrolled member of the Anishinaabe nation (also known as Ojibwa and Chippewa)"] 

Message Edited by Peppermill on 07-21-2009 07:13 PM
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: LbW reading selections

I would second any of your Native American writers Pepper but preferably the first or the last.  I think it is high time we read something by a Native American.  Perhaps TiggerBear could advise?   

 

There has been a lot of excitement around the Man Booker Prize this year and I would be interested in nominating Wolf Hall when we can get it in paperback.   

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Peppermill
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Re: LbW reading selections

Choisya -- I have nominated

Ceremony by Leslie Silko, although I have not read the book myself.  Its nomination is based on the reviews and comments I have seen over the past several months when I have been looking for books by Native American women.  Silko has Laguna Pueblo roots.  The Wikipedia article linked from her name here discusses her work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I listened to a library copy of The Plague of Doves  by Louise Erdich shortly after the last round of nominations.   I did not nominate it for this round of voting, but will probably do so sometime in the future if not selected earlier based on someone else's recommendation.  It is a complicated tale, very readable (listenable), and should make for an interesting discussion if ever selected.


Choisya wrote:

I would second any of your Native American writers Pepper but preferably the first or the last.  I think it is high time we read something by a Native American.  Perhaps TiggerBear could advise?   

 

There has been a lot of excitement around the Man Booker Prize this year and I would be interested in nominating Wolf Hall when we can get it in paperback.   


We really should read something by Alice Munro.  My question is what to nominate:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Runaway 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OR...... 
 
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: A French authoress, well translated

Yes, I read the book (in French). It is a very successful book. it has been published last year and it is already sold as a paperback. The movie will be out in September.

Here is a link (in French, sorry!) which can give you an idea of the look of the main characters: just click on "Hérisson 1" and Hérisson 2" so as to see an extract of the movie.

By the way, the main character is Josiane Balasko: she is a very good actress and can look much better in the real life!

 

As for the book, I didn't like it. I think that the only thread of the book is very weak. Academic Classical knowledge (music, literature, painting) is highly regarded in France, so anyone who is knowledgeable in that matter is highly regarded, which is not fair for all those who work with their hands for instance and are not  gifted for the work of the mind... (sorry I might not be bery clear....and short of time to write more tonight).


Peppermill wrote:

Has anyone here read The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery?

 

I just finished it and have yet to decide whether to be entranced or amused, or simply both.  Perhaps bemused (3) would be the appropriate word.

Message Edited by Peppermill on 06-30-2009 09:03 PM

 

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Choisya
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Re: LbW reading selections

Thanks P - I have PMd Melissa to second that. 
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Muriel Barbery - The Elegance of the Hedgehog

Thanks, Danielle!  I enjoyed the excerpts from the movie, even though I could not fully understand them.  I also forwarded them to friends here who are reading the book; I don't believe they were aware of the movie.

 

TEoTH is apparently a current "chic" read in some circles here.  I doubt we are as aware of the snob factor, but rather more delighted to read of a character who feels she must hide her erudition, but who has some delightful experiences when she is found out. Also, young nerds must sometimes struggle to fit into US schools and groups of young people and need to find a sympathic friend.


chadadanielleKR wrote:

Yes, I read the book (in French). It is a very successful book. it has been published last year and it is already sold as a paperback. The movie will be out in September.

Here is a link (in French, sorry!) which can give you an idea of the look of the main characters: just click on "Hérisson 1" and Hérisson 2" so as to see an extract of the movie.

By the way, the main character is Josiane Balasko: she is a very good actress and can look much better in the real life!

 

As for the book, I didn't like it. I think that the only thread of the book is very weak. Academic Classical knowledge (music, literature, painting) is highly regarded in France, so anyone who is knowledgeable in that matter is highly regarded, which is not fair for all those who work with their hands for instance and are not  gifted for the work of the mind... (sorry I might not be bery clear....and short of time to write more tonight).


Peppermill wrote:

Has anyone here read The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery?

 

I just finished it and have yet to decide whether to be entranced or amused, or simply both.  Perhaps bemused (3) would be the appropriate word.



"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Muriel Barbery - The Elegance of the Hedgehog

[ Edited ]

post moved to introductions thread.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Message Edited by TheTrueBookAddict on 08-11-2009 02:09 AM
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Peppermill
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Re: THE BOOK NOOK: Welcome to the LbW Common Room!

Melissa -- may we have a thread on our author, Nadine Gordimer?

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy