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Melissa_W
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THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

Please use this thread to discuss the story "The Limpet".

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
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Fozzie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

[ Edited ]

Dilly was a piece of work!  She was very conniving and used the power of suggestion to manipulate people all her life, until they figured her out, yet she still seemed puzzled why her kindness did not “pay dividends.”

 

The title is hilarious!  I didn’t know what a limpet was, so I looked up the definition:

“Any of numerous gastropods that have a conical shell and are found clinging to rocks”
Not quite as bad as a parasite, but Dilly is a clingy person.

 

 

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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dulcinea3
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

If you ever meet this woman, don't walk, run away from her!  She destroys everyone in her life.  I thought she was very passive-agressive.  She says that she is unselfish, but really she just works on people to get what she wants.  When her parents tell her about the job in Australia, she tells them that Aunt Madge doesn't like her, and manages to convince her mother that her father doesn't really want to go, and that she won't like it because she won't have their maid, etc.  Typical: "And I laughed cheerfully, so as not to worry her, and teased her, too, and said how lovely it would be for her in the warm sunshine of Australia, while I was sitting alone in the bedroom of Aunt Madge's London house."  Of course, they don't go, and her father doesn't advance in his career.  Then she manages to convince her mother that her father is having an affair, and tells her father that her mother is upset with him.  She also convinces her father that he is sick.  Next step is to get to London, so she manages to get her aunt scared about burglars, and her parents worried about her father's health, so they will move to live with her aunt.  Her father dies soon afterwards, and she convinces her mother and aunt to move to the country because the city isn't safe during the war, and of course they end up getting killed in the country.  Her aunt must not have disliked her so much, because she lives Dilly her house.  And on, and on, destroying everyone who comes into her orbit.  It was almost humorous how she pursued that actor until he did whatever he could to avoid her, while she thought he was smitten with her!  It's almost sad how un-self-aware she is; I think she truly does believe that she does everything out of her love for others, and is left at the end wondering why everything bad happens to HER!

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chadadanielleKR
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

What is surprising is that no one ever told her that she really behaved very badly to her family and to all the persons she met and  that she never seemed to have been aware that she was truly manipulative. She just thought that she was innocently doing the right thing. The only one who managed at last to escape from her grip was Lord Chichester.

I think it is a very interesting character and a very good story because of all the events which were connected to the actions of one single person.

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dulcinea3
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"


chadadanielleKR wrote:

I think it is a very interesting character and a very good story because of all the events which were connected to the actions of one single person.


I think this was one of my favorite stories in the collection.

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Fozzie
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"


dulcinea3 wrote:

chadadanielleKR wrote:

I think it is a very interesting character and a very good story because of all the events which were connected to the actions of one single person.


I think this was one of my favorite stories in the collection.


I also felt it was a favorite story.  I remember that it was written later than the other stories.  It was also longer, giving the author a chance to provide more character development and plot.

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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Ryan_G
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

I'm not so sure she doesn't have a sneaking suspicion of what she is truly like, every once in a while I get the idea that she knows why people react to her the way they do, but she quickly comes up with a different reason.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

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Melissa_W
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

I agree - it's like their reaction gives her pause but just when she thinks the cause is her behavior denial kicks in and she sifts the blame.


Ryan_G wrote:

I'm not so sure she doesn't have a sneaking suspicion of what she is truly like, every once in a while I get the idea that she knows why people react to her the way they do, but she quickly comes up with a different reason.


 

Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
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Re: THE DOLL: "The Limpet"

I rather like characters like her though.  I read Gillespie and I by Jane Harris earlier in the year, and the main character, Harriet Baxter, is a lot like that.  Naturally, Harriet is in a full length novel so her character is more fleshed out, but she is just as delusional.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com