Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Contributor
JamiSings
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎07-16-2011
0 Kudos

Fairy tale about Dandelion Fairies & a sickly princess.

I don't know if this was a one-shot in a magazine like Highlights or if it was a Little Golden Book. I just remember reading it sometime in the mid-80s in a doctor's office. 

 

The story was about some fairies who live in dandelions in a cow pasture next to the royal gardens. They face all sorts of challenges because of the cows. One day a big wind sweeps up one or more of the fairies and they float into the bedroom of a very sickly little princess. 

 

They demand to know why she's in bed on such a beautiful day and she informs them she's sick. They think there's nothing wrong with her that some fresh air and sunshine wouldn't cure. Sure enough, soon as she starts playing outside she becomes healthy. In gratitude, the kind allows a certain amount of dandelions to grow in the royal gardens so the fairies have a cow free place to live. 

 

I'm hoping it's an actual book and not a magazine. Because if it was the latter I'm out of luck.