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New User
CStyles
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-01-2013
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Noblewomen are not allowed to sing lest they destroy the empire of immortal old men

[ Edited ]

Alright, Here goes.

 

THis book has something to do with water (it shows a woman in front of a wave in the cover).

 

The main plot is, this young noblewoman is conforming to society the way she's supposed to (household tasks, throwing parties, being a fluffhead etc) but she is not allowed to sing.

The evil empire of immortal old men forbid noble females to sing because apparently one woman will have the ability to tumble the whole empire by singing. Common folk are allowed to sing though.

These old men retain their youthfulness by feeding pregnant/lactating women who have been fed drugs in tea for about a week, and then sacrificed to the plant, which is then used to make a potion to keep them young. But it has to be a woman who is pregnant or lactating because using any old person doesnt make it strong enough to last long Also i think the babies are consumed as well???? As a result, noblemen often sacrifice their young wives so that they may, possibly, be brought into the ranks of the immortal. Its a council i believe.

I remember two passages.

An older woman is talking to the main female character about how her or her daughter (dont remmeber which) runs away and sings and sings while growing cabbages and married to a farmer. They're hiding in a garden.

 

The last peice i remember is the main female character climbs up to her old room at her finishing school (ladies academy for how to be a proper married noblewoman) and when she speaks, everyone looks at her weird because shes singing everything.

 

its a generously sized book 400-800 paperback pages. I might be wrong though. I read it in highschool, and amongst other books, i cannot remember them! I wish i knew enough to write the info down somewhere!

 

Anyone who can help me, i would very very much appreciate it! I look forward to hearing from you!!!

New User
CStyles
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-01-2013
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Re: Noblewomen are not allowed to sing lest they destroy the empire of immortal old men

Found my answer thank you :smileyhappy:
Inspired Bibliophile
LarryOnLI
Posts: 1,998
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: Noblewomen are not allowed to sing lest they destroy the empire of immortal old men

When you find the answer, it's nice to post it here in case other members became interested in the book from your description.

 

Reader 4
Nyota_Uhura
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-11-2013
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Re: Noblewomen are not allowed to sing lest they destroy the empire of immortal old men

I became interested in finding this book as well and found out that the book is Singer from the Sea by Sheri S Tepper. CStyles did confirm this on another book community website.