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Jessica
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About the Book & Author

[ Edited ]

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez

Title: Love in the Time of Cholera

In the late 1800s, in a Caribbean port city, a young telegraph operator named Florentino Ariza falls deliriously in love with Fermina Daza, a beautiful student. She is so sheltered that they carry on their romance secretly, through letters and telegrams. When Fermina Daza's father finds out about her suitor, he sends her on a trip intended to make her forget the affair. Lorenza Daza has much higher ambitions for his daughter than the humble Florentino. Her grief at being torn away from her lover is profound, but when she returns she breaks off the relationship, calling everything that has happened between them an illusion.

Instead, she marries the elegant, cultured, and successful Dr. Juvenal Urbino. As his wife, she will think of herself as "the happiest woman in the world." Though devastated by her rejection, Florentino Ariza is not one to be deterred. He has declared his eternal love for Fermina, and determines to gain the fame and fortune he needs to win her back. When Fermina's husband at last dies, 51 years, 9 months, and 4 days later, Florentino Ariza approaches Fermina again at her husband's funeral. There have been hundreds of other affairs, but none of these women have captured his heart as Fermina did. "He is ugly and sad," says one of his lovers, "but he is all love."

In this magnificent story of a romance, García Márquez beautifully and unflinchingly explores the nature of love in all its guises, small and large, passionate and serene. Love can emerge like a disease in these characters, but it can also outlast bleak decades of war and cholera, and the effects of time itself. "This shining and heartbreaking novel," Thomas Pynchon wrote in The New York Times Book Review, is one of those few rare works "that can even return our worn souls to us."

About Gabriel García Márquez: A chief practitioner of the "magic-realist" style, Gabriel García Márquez's influence and importance lie in his crucial role of bringing Latin-American fiction to wider audiences while pioneering it at the same time. The Colombian-born Nobel winner tells fantastical tales of romance and heroism against an historic Latin American backdrop, always infusing believability by giving his writing a journalistic cast. Learn more in Meet the Writers.

Discover all titles and editions from Gabriel García Márquez.

Message Edited by Jessica on 10-09-2007 09:43 AM

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BarbaraN
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Re: About the Book & Author

How do you reference the author's name?

When I went to the library to get some of his books, I could not find any on the self so I asked the librarian explaining that I had looked for "Márquez." She remarked that she had made that mistake once and he was filled under "G" for Garcia. However, when I went to find the book for this discussion at B&N it was in the stacks under Márquez. I understand many Spanish people have two last names. In the US we would probably hyphenate it. Does anyone know the proper way to refer to Gabriel García Márquez by just his last name?

Barbara
Melissa_W
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Re: About the Book & Author

I think it just depends on how the cataloger looked at it. I know that we keep his works in English under "Marquez" at the store because that's how most customers would look for GGM since the last name is not hyphenated (we do something similar for the Divine Comedy - goes under Dante not Alighieri because everyone looks for it under Dante). But I think in the Spanish language section his is listed under "Garcia".



BarbaraN wrote:
How do you reference the author's name?

When I went to the library to get some of his books, I could not find any on the self so I asked the librarian explaining that I had looked for "Márquez." She remarked that she had made that mistake once and he was filled under "G" for Garcia. However, when I went to find the book for this discussion at B&N it was in the stacks under Márquez. I understand many Spanish people have two last names. In the US we would probably hyphenate it. Does anyone know the proper way to refer to Gabriel García Márquez by just his last name?

Barbara


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
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Jessica
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Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: About the Book & Author

Yep. It's "García Márquez."
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