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Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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First Impressions

Have you read Love in the Time of Cholera before? *Without giving away any spoilers,* share your general impressions with the group.

And if you're just beginning the book for the first time, let us know how you're liking it so far.

Reply to this message to start the conversation!
Melissa_W
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: First Impressions

I read Cholera (way) back in high school and I think the best term for it is breath-taking. The prose is beautiful, the story is so heartbreaking, gorgeous. I think this one is a better read than 100 Years of Solitude because Cholera is more accessible; while 100 Years is probably the best example of GGM's writing and shows how far you can take the form (but it's really weird and very dense), Cholera is very relatable while retaining the magical/realism quality that GGM is known for.

So: if you read 100 Years of Solitude and had a little trouble with it, give GGM another chance and try Love in the Time of Cholera :smileyhappy:



Jessica wrote:
Have you read Love in the Time of Cholera before? *Without giving away any spoilers,* share your general impressions with the group.

And if you're just beginning the book for the first time, let us know how you're liking it so far.

Reply to this message to start the conversation!


Melissa W.
I read and knit and dance. Compulsively feel yarn. Consume books. Darn tights. Drink too much caffiene. All that good stuff.
balletbookworm.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: First Impressions


pedsphleb wrote: I read Cholera (way) back in high school and I think the best term for it is breath-taking. The prose is beautiful, the story is so heartbreaking, gorgeous. I think this one is a better read than 100 Years of Solitude because Cholera is more accessible; while 100 Years is probably the best example of GGM's writing and shows how far you can take the form (but it's really weird and very dense), Cholera is very relatable while retaining the magical/realism quality that GGM is known for. So: if you read 100 Years of Solitude and had a little trouble with it, give GGM another chance and try Love in the Time of Cholera



Hi Melissa,
I could not agree more. I also read 100 Years, and while it was great, it was a bit of a labor-intensive read. Cholera, however, is a book to savor!
Jessica
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APenForYourThoughts
Posts: 394
Registered: ‎06-22-2007
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Re: First Impressions

Perfect description, pedsphleb. I just read this book for the first time three months ago, and I definitely count it as one of my favorites. Marquez's style is so poetic, and it captures you in its magic, reaching into the deepest corners of your soul and appealing to your deepest thoughts and emotions. I deliberately took a very long time to read it and often reread portions of it, just because I didn't want it to end and drop me back off in reality. Frequently very poignant, always thought-provoking and intense -- indescribably beautiful.
"A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us." --Kafka
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brittabe
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-08-2007
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Re: First Impressions

Thanks for your advice, as I had trouble with One Hundred Years. I'm hoping to enjoy "Cholera", so your words are encouraging!
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Walrus
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎09-28-2007
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Re: First Impressions

Didn't want to enter until I finished this book which I found slow moving altho well written. I was somewhat disappointed with both main characters and especially his treatment of women other than Feminina. It seems like he thought he was God's gift to widows so that was upsetting. He also did not appear to reALLY KNOW HIS BUSINESS AND was lucky to succeed at all. The ending which some people probably felt was glorious was farfetched, unrealistic and contrived as if the author didn't know how to end the story. Also any doctor in his right mind would not climb a ladder in his 80's. The whole story was not credible in my opinion and I had to force myself to finish it hoping it would get better, but it did not. I was looking forward to the movie since I do like the male lead, but the movie got so-so reviews and I found it hard to believe it would translate well to the screen. One rainy cold day with nothing else to do I decided to go see it, but the movie had already moved out of the theatre. Sorry, I could not be more positive. I also was not sure what country it took place- thought perhaps Columbia and glad you all confirmed that. Otherwise was going to look up the Magdelina river. Needless to say- not anxious to read his other books.
dg
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dg
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎10-13-2007
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Re: First Impressions

I'm almost at the end of the book which I'm reading for a book club and I'm not finding it as enjoyable as most people seem to. I agree that it's slow moving and I don't feel it really draws me in. I'm disappointed.
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