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Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

Since marriage was just about the only career open to women of Austen's day, I would say that she is writing about career girls in training for their life's work.

ConnieK wrote:
APen and others--How would you defend Austen against critics who say her novels do a disservice to women by focusing so much on the courtship rituals of her day?


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

That's a very nice perspective!

Laurel wrote:
Since marriage was just about the only career open to women of Austen's day, I would say that she is writing about career girls in training for their life's work.

ConnieK wrote:
APen and others--How would you defend Austen against critics who say her novels do a disservice to women by focusing so much on the courtship rituals of her day?





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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

I agree.  I think she also shows the intricacies of that "work" and how it is not, and was not, as simple as one might expect.  Like other "occupations" today, it has its politics, networking, strategies for getting ahead, etc.  Interesting.

Everyman wrote:
That's a very nice perspective!

Laurel wrote:
Since marriage was just about the only career open to women of Austen's day, I would say that she is writing about career girls in training for their life's work.

ConnieK wrote:
APen and others--How would you defend Austen against critics who say her novels do a disservice to women by focusing so much on the courtship rituals of her day?








~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

[ Edited ]
I also think that Austen focuses on the reasons for getting married, and shows differences between the right and the wrong reasons.  "The courtship rituals of her day" are pretty much skewered, as we see silly men and women flirting with each other, going after wealthy partners, etc.  Austen's heroines marry for love, and they marry worthwhile men who appreciate them for their qualities rather than just seeing them as "the little woman".  Of course, in three of the novels (Mansfield Park, Emma, and Northanger Abbey), the men are in part responsible for having guided the women to develop the qualities that they value.


Message Edited by dulcinea3 on 05-24-2008 05:25 PM
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Audrey555
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Registered: ‎05-18-2008
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

I am a huge Jane Austen fan.  I love her wit and ironic style.  I enjoy reading her books because even though her heroes/heroines have high moral standards, they do make mistakes (except Fanny).  They all go on a voyage of self-discovery, and through these journeys, they become better persons.
 
I love reading her novels because she completely understands her characters, and she beautifully illustrates them.  Finally, it is very gratifying to see that at the end everyone gets what he/she deserves!
 
 
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Laurel
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Re: "Janeites," Unite!

How beautifully you express it, Audrey!

Audrey555 wrote:
I am a huge Jane Austen fan. I love her wit and ironic style. I enjoy reading her books because even though her heroes/heroines have high moral standards, they do make mistakes (except Fanny). They all go on a voyage of self-discovery, and through these journeys, they become better persons.
I love reading her novels because she completely understands her characters, and she beautifully illustrates them. Finally, it is very gratifying to see that at the end everyone gets what he/she deserves!



"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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