Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Contributor
Vitin
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Message from Your Moderator

Hi! This is the class wanted to join, which I knew off months ago, however, up until now have I been able to join. I thought B&NU didn't want me posting. What a relief. About Shelley's Frankenstein. When I was a boy, he terrified me even in my dreams. No one could act like the monster near me, for I would scream my head off. I had to see a school psychologist and all. Now that I'm over 50, I look at those times with laughter. Have read the book, and seen many versions of it, in the movies. Have learned that there are many Frankensteins out there. Although, a recurring dream has to do with the "monster", I have learned to live with it, and try to decipher its meaning. Hope I'm welcomed back, looking forward to lots of fun learning from the posts, as I have in the past.
Contributor
Vitin
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Complaints & Suggestions section?

Hi! Choysia: Its me Victor from Puerto Rico. Joined late. You read my posts as Vitin. My family nickname for me. I didn't want it to be known by non-family members, but part of the new setups is that semi secret things like my nickname comes out. I agree with you. To me this new set up is not as personal as the old one. It's too formal, for a non degree program. Well, anyways, good to read your posts again. Victor.
Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Message from Your Moderator

I thought I'd add some stuff about Mary Shelley's life along with what was going on in the the world both literarily and historically. This is from the Everyman's Edition published by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1992.

1789
Blake: Songs of Innocence.
French Revolution begins
1790
Edmund Burk: Reflections on the Revolution in France.
1791
Tom Paine: The Rights of Man.
Luigi Galvani postulates existence of 'animal electricity'.
1792
Mary Wollestonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.
Shelley born.
1793
William Godwin: Enquiry Concerning Political Justice.
England declares war on France.
1794
William Godwin: Caleb Williams.
1795
Mrs Radcliffe: Mysteries of Udolpho.
Keats and Carlyle born.
1797
William Godwin and Mary Wollestonecraft married (29 March); Mary Wollestonecraft Godwin born (30 august); her mother dies (10 September).
Friedrich von Schelling publishes first volume detailing his pantheistic philosophy of nature.
1798
William Godwin: Memoirs of Mary Wollestonecraft.
Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads.
1800
Maria Edgeworth: Castle Rackrent.
Alessandro Volta develops first electric battery. Eli Whitney develops interchangeable parts for muskets.
1801
Godwin marries Mary Jane Clairmont.
Matthew Gregory Lewis: Tales of Wonder.
1805
Battle of Trafalgar.
1807
Wordsworth: Poems.
Franco-Russian alliance against England.
1808
Mary Wollestonecraft Godwin publishes her first work, Mounseer Mongtongpaw.
1809
Tennyson born.
Byron: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.
Coleridge: The Friend.
Lamarck publishes most complete version of this theory of evolution.
1810
Scott: Lady of te Lake.
Friedrich Koenig's power-driven press initiates mass production of printed matter.
1811
Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility.
George III declared insane; Prince Regent takes over.
1812
Mary meets Percy Bysshe Shelley and his wife Harriet at Godwin's house.
Byron: Childe Harold.
Shelley: An Address to the Irish People.
Dickens and Browning born.
Napoleon retreats from Moscow.
1813
Spends most of the year living with the Baxter family in Scotland.
Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice.
Shelley: >Queen Mab.
Byron: The Gaiour.
Robert Owen's utopian socialism expounded in New View of Society.
1814
Meets Shelley for the second time (13 May); elopes with him, taking along her step-sister Jane (later Claire) Clairmont (28 July). The threesome travel through Europe, then settle in London.
Scott: Waverly.
Shelley: A Refutation of Deism.
Wordsworth: The Excursion.
England at peace with America.
1815
First child, a daughter, born 22 February and dies 6 March.
Byron: Hebrew Melodies.
Jane Austen: Emma.
Trollope born.
Napoleon defeated at Waterloo.
1816
Second child, William Shelley, born (24 January). Begins writing Frankenstein in Switzerland (mid-June). Fanny Imlay, Mary's half-sister, commits suicide (October). Shelley's wife Harriet commits suicide (November). Mary and Shelley marry in London (December).
Shelley: Alastor.
Coleridge: Christabl, and Kubla Khan.
Peacock: Headlong Hall.
Charlotte Bronte born.
Widespread economic depression in England (through 1820). Spa Fields Riots in London.
1817
Finishes writing Frankenstein, publishes History of a Six Weeks' Tour. Third child, Clara Everina Shelley, born (2 September). Daughter (Allegra) born to Claire Clairmont and Byron.
Shelley: Laon and Cyntha.
Byron: Tasso and Manfred.
Coleridge: Biograhia Literaria.
Keats: Poems.
Jane Austen dies; Northanger Abbey and Persuasion published.
Coercion Acts passed by British parliament. David Ricardo publishes Principles of Political Economy and Taxation. Work begins on the Erie Canal.
1818
Frankenstein published (1 January). The Shelleys leave England for Italy (12 March). Clara dies in Venice, aged one (24 September).
Emily Bronte born.
Byron: Beppo.
Keats: Endymion.
Secret societies (including the Carbonari) grow in Italy, with revolution against foreign rule and Italian unification as primary goals.
1819
William Shelley dies in Rome, aged three (7 June). Mary writes Mathilda but leaves it unpublished on the advice of her father (its theme: father-daughter incestuous love). Percy Florence Shelley, her fourth and only surviving child, born in Florence (12 November).
Scott: Ivanhoe.
Wordsworth: Peter Bell.
Byron: Dona Juan and Mazeppa.
George Eliot and John Ruskin born.
Peterloo Massacre in Manchester. Schopenhauer publishes his philosophy of pessimism.
1820
Writes Proserpina and Midas (mythological dramas). Shelleys continue to live in Italy.
Shelley: Prometheus Unbound.
George III dies; accession of George IV; divorce proceedings initiated against Queen Caroline. Neopolitan Revolution led by Carbonari.
1821
Shelleys meet Edward and Jane Williams in Pisa.
Shelley: Adonis and Defense of Poetry.
Hazlitt: Table Talk.
Carbonari uprising in Piedmont.
1822
Miscarriage (16 June), from which Mary nearly dies. Shelley and Edward Williams drowned in Gulf of Spezia (8 July).
Matthew Arnold born.
Keats dies; buried in Rome.
Castlereagh dies; liberal influence increases in British cabinet.
1823
Shelley buried in Rome. Mary returns to England. Valperga published.
Charles Lamb: Essays of Elia.
1824
Publishes her edition of Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley.
Byron dies in Greece.
Combination Acts repealed by parliament; rapid but short-lived development of trade unionism.
1826
publishes The Last Man. Through death of Harriet Shelley's son, Percy Florence becomes heir to baronetcy.
Disraeli: Vivian Grey.
1830
Publishes Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck.
Coleridge: Church and State.
Cobbett: Rural Rides.
Charles Lyell publishes Principles of Geology. Era of parliamentary reform begins.
1831
Pulishes revised versions of Proserpina and Frankenstein.
Charles Darwin begins his voyage on the HMS Beagle (finished 1836).
1832
William Godwin Jr (Mary's half-brother) dies; Percy Florence enters Harrow.
Third Reform Bill. Hippolyte Pixii develops first mechanical generator of electricity.
1834
Coleridge dies.
Balzac: Pere Goriot.
Alexis de Tocqueville begins publishing Democracy in America.
1835
Publishes Lives of the Most Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of Italy, Spain & Portugal; and Lodore.
1836
William Godwin dies.
Dickens: Pickwick Papers.
1837
Publishes Falkner. Percy Florence enters Trinity College, Cambridge.
Hawthorne: Twice-Told Tales.
Balzac: Lost Illusions.
Accession of Queen Victoria.
1838
Publishes Lives of the Most Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of France.
Dickens: Nicholas Nickleby.
1839
Publishes her edition of Shelley's Poetical Works and Letters. Periods of severe illness begin.
Chartist agitation in England.
1840
Tours Europe with Percy Florence and his friends.
Louis Agassiz expounds his ice-age theory of geological change.
1841
Dickens: Barnaby Rudge.
Poe: 'Murders in the Rue Morgue.'
Emerson: Essays.
1842
Second continental tour with Percy Florence and his friends.
Gogol: Dead Souls.
1843
Henry James born.
Wordsworth becomes Poet Laureate.
1844
Percy inherits baronetcy on the death of his grandfather, Sir Timothy Shelley. Mary publishes Rambles in Germany & Italy.
1845
Dostoevsky: Poor Folk.
1846
Repeal of the Corn Laws.
1847
Carlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre.
Emily Brone: Wuthering Heights.
Melville: Omoo.
1848
Percy marries Jane St John.
Thoreau: On the Duty of Civil Disobedience.
Marx and Engles: Communist Manifesto. Political upheaval throughout Europe (but not in England).
1850
Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter.
1851
Dies in London (1 February); buried in Bournemouth.
Melville: Moby-Dick.
Hawthorne: House of the Seven Gables.
Great Exhibition on London. Herbert Spencer: Social Statics.

Denise
Frequent Contributor
donyskiw
Posts: 578
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Message from Your Moderator

I thought I'd add some stuff about Mary Shelley's life along with what was going on in the the world both literarily and historically. This is from the Everyman's Edition published by Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1992.

1789
Blake: Songs of Innocence.
French Revolution begins
1790
Edmund Burk: Reflections on the Revolution in France.
1791
Tom Paine: The Rights of Man.
Luigi Galvani postulates existence of 'animal electricity'.
1792
Mary Wollestonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.
Shelley born.
1793
William Godwin: Enquiry Concerning Political Justice.
England declares war on France.
1794
William Godwin: Caleb Williams.
1795
Mrs Radcliffe: Mysteries of Udolpho.
Keats and Carlyle born.
1797
William Godwin and Mary Wollestonecraft married (29 March); Mary Wollestonecraft Godwin born (30 august); her mother dies (10 September).
Friedrich von Schelling publishes first volume detailing his pantheistic philosophy of nature.
1798
William Godwin: Memoirs of Mary Wollestonecraft.
Wordsworth and Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads.
1800
Maria Edgeworth: Castle Rackrent.
Alessandro Volta develops first electric battery. Eli Whitney develops interchangeable parts for muskets.
1801
Godwin marries Mary Jane Clairmont.
Matthew Gregory Lewis: Tales of Wonder.
1805
Battle of Trafalgar.
1807
Wordsworth: Poems.
Franco-Russian alliance against England.
1808
Mary Wollestonecraft Godwin publishes her first work, Mounseer Mongtongpaw.
1809
Tennyson born.
Byron: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers.
Coleridge: The Friend.
Lamarck publishes most complete version of this theory of evolution.
1810
Scott: Lady of the Lake.
Friedrich Koenig's power-driven press initiates mass production of printed matter.
1811
Jane Austen: Sense and Sensibility.
George III declared insane; Prince Regent takes over.
1812
Mary meets Percy Bysshe Shelley and his wife Harriet at Godwin's house.
Byron: Childe Harold.
Shelley: An Address to the Irish People.
Dickens and Browning born.
Napoleon retreats from Moscow.
1813
Spends most of the year living with the Baxter family in Scotland.
Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice.
Shelley: Queen Mab.
Byron: The Gaiour.
Robert Owen's utopian socialism expounded in New View of Society.
1814
Meets Shelley for the second time (13 May); elopes with him, taking along her step-sister Jane (later Claire) Clairmont (28 July). The threesome travel through Europe, then settle in London.
Scott: Waverly.
Shelley: A Refutation of Deism.
Wordsworth: The Excursion.
England at peace with America.
1815
First child, a daughter, born 22 February and dies 6 March.
Byron: Hebrew Melodies.
Jane Austen: Emma.
Trollope born.
Napoleon defeated at Waterloo.
1816
Second child, William Shelley, born (24 January). Begins writing Frankenstein in Switzerland (mid-June). Fanny Imlay, Mary's half-sister, commits suicide (October). Shelley's wife Harriet commits suicide (November). Mary and Shelley marry in London (December).
Shelley: Alastor.
Coleridge: Christabel, and Kubla Khan.
Peacock: Headlong Hall.
Charlotte Bronte born.
Widespread economic depression in England (through 1820). Spa Fields Riots in London.
1817
Finishes writing Frankenstein, publishes History of a Six Weeks' Tour. Third child, Clara Everina Shelley, born (2 September). Daughter (Allegra) born to Claire Clairmont and Byron.
Shelley: Laon and Cyntha.
Byron: Tasso and Manfred.
Coleridge: Biograhia Literaria.
Keats: Poems.
Jane Austen dies; Northanger Abbey and Persuasion published.
Coercion Acts passed by British parliament. David Ricardo publishes Principles of Political Economy and Taxation. Work begins on the Erie Canal.
1818
Frankenstein published (1 January). The Shelleys leave England for Italy (12 March). Clara dies in Venice, aged one (24 September).
Emily Bronte born.
Byron: Beppo.
Keats: Endymion.
Secret societies (including the Carbonari) grow in Italy, with revolution against foreign rule and Italian unification as primary goals.
1819
William Shelley dies in Rome, aged three (7 June). Mary writes Mathilda but leaves it unpublished on the advice of her father (its theme: father-daughter incestuous love). Percy Florence Shelley, her fourth and only surviving child, born in Florence (12 November).
Scott: Ivanhoe.
Wordsworth: Peter Bell.
Byron: Dona Juan and Mazeppa.
George Eliot and John Ruskin born.
Peterloo Massacre in Manchester. Schopenhauer publishes his philosophy of pessimism.
1820
Writes Proserpina and Midas (mythological dramas). Shelleys continue to live in Italy.
Shelley: Prometheus Unbound.
George III dies; accession of George IV; divorce proceedings initiated against Queen Caroline. Neopolitan Revolution led by Carbonari.
1821
Shelleys meet Edward and Jane Williams in Pisa.
Shelley: Adonis and Defense of Poetry.
Hazlitt: Table Talk.
Carbonari uprising in Piedmont.
1822
Miscarriage (16 June), from which Mary nearly dies. Shelley and Edward Williams drowned in Gulf of Spezia (8 July).
Matthew Arnold born.
Keats dies; buried in Rome.
Castlereagh dies; liberal influence increases in British cabinet.
1823
Shelley buried in Rome. Mary returns to England. Valperga published.
Charles Lamb: Essays of Elia.
1824
Publishes her edition of Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley.
Byron dies in Greece.
Combination Acts repealed by parliament; rapid but short-lived development of trade unionism.
1826
publishes The Last Man. Through death of Harriet Shelley's son, Percy Florence becomes heir to baronetcy.
Disraeli: Vivian Grey.
1830
Publishes Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck.
Coleridge: Church and State.
Cobbett: Rural Rides.
Charles Lyell publishes Principles of Geology. Era of parliamentary reform begins.
1831
Pulishes revised versions of Proserpina and Frankenstein.
Charles Darwin begins his voyage on the HMS Beagle (finished 1836).
1832
William Godwin Jr (Mary's half-brother) dies; Percy Florence enters Harrow.
Third Reform Bill. Hippolyte Pixii develops first mechanical generator of electricity.
1834
Coleridge dies.
Balzac: Pere Goriot.
Alexis de Tocqueville begins publishing Democracy in America.
1835
Publishes Lives of the Most Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of Italy, Spain & Portugal; and Lodore.
1836
William Godwin dies.
Dickens: Pickwick Papers.
1837
Publishes Falkner. Percy Florence enters Trinity College, Cambridge.
Hawthorne: Twice-Told Tales.
Balzac: Lost Illusions.
Accession of Queen Victoria.
1838
Publishes Lives of the Most Eminent Literary and Scientific Men of France.
Dickens: Nicholas Nickleby.
1839
Publishes her edition of Shelley's Poetical Works and Letters. Periods of severe illness begin.
Chartist agitation in England.
1840
Tours Europe with Percy Florence and his friends.
Louis Agassiz expounds his ice-age theory of geological change.
1841
Dickens: Barnaby Rudge.
Poe: 'Murders in the Rue Morgue.'
Emerson: Essays.
1842
Second continental tour with Percy Florence and his friends.
Gogol: Dead Souls.
1843
Henry James born.
Wordsworth becomes Poet Laureate.
1844
Percy inherits baronetcy on the death of his grandfather, Sir Timothy Shelley. Mary publishes Rambles in Germany & Italy.
1845
Dostoevsky: Poor Folk.
1846
Repeal of the Corn Laws.
1847
Carlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre.
Emily Brone: Wuthering Heights.
Melville: Omoo.
1848
Percy marries Jane St John.
Thoreau: On the Duty of Civil Disobedience.
Marx and Engles: Communist Manifesto. Political upheaval throughout Europe (but not in England).
1850
Hawthorne: The Scarlet Letter.
1851
Dies in London (1 February); buried in Bournemouth.
Melville: Moby-Dick.
Hawthorne: House of the Seven Gables.
Great Exhibition on London. Herbert Spencer: Social Statics.

Denise
New User
dmcintosh24
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Message from Your Moderator

Hi everyone! My name is Dylan, Mid 30s and working in a technical field. Most of my reading over the last 10 years has been tech manuals and business journals and I decided it was time to get back into some good reading. I have a two year old son that I read to every night and I thought that it would best if I got back into reading.

When searching around B&N the other day, the only books that compelled me to pick them up were in the classic section. Let me get a couple chapters down and I'll join in the early discussions.

Anyone know what the next classic book will be?
Dylan McIntosh
~~ Catching up on all the classics that I should have read better in school!!!
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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welcome

So glad you're joining us, Dylan.
The next classic novel's not yet decided, but we are planning an ongoing, umbrella "British Classics" section, so tell us what your interests are.
Thanks,
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


New User
dmcintosh24
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: welcome

thanks for the welcome.

I was hoping for something in the future of doing Robinson Crusoe, Invisible Man, War of the worlds or any Dickens book.

But any great book would be ok with me. I'm just looking forward to some good reading and discussions.
Dylan McIntosh
~~ Catching up on all the classics that I should have read better in school!!!
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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thanks

Thanks for the suggestions. Sounds like you like the lost, big hearted outsider (Crusoe and Invisible Man)--so I'll be interested to hear how you think Frankenstein's monster fills the Outsider role.



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: A Message from Your Moderator



dmcintosh24 wrote:
Hi everyone! My name is Dylan, Mid 30s and working in a technical field. Most of my reading over the last 10 years has been tech manuals and business journals and I decided it was time to get back into some good reading. I have a two year old son that I read to every night and I thought that it would best if I got back into reading.

When searching around B&N the other day, the only books that compelled me to pick them up were in the classic section. Let me get a couple chapters down and I'll join in the early discussions.

Anyone know what the next classic book will be?





Hi and welcome Dylan! We don't know when the next Classics bookclub will be but we have been told by the Moderator that there will be one on British Classsics and possibly one on Ancient and European ones. So that is something to look forward to in the New Year!

When my children were young I used to edit technical manuals for English IT people, mostly by converting them from American into English, would you believe? American writing, amongst other things, has a very high 'fog index' and part of my work was breaking down long sentences into short ones and long paragraphs into shorter ones:smileyhappy:
New User
acbr00
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Message from Your Moderator

Ms. Simons. finally joined and will get up to speed this weekend. I am 52 years old, an attorney ,and living in Jupiter Florida. Love this Classic and looking forward to the discussions on the life topics that are so relevant today. More so then in the early 19th Century. AC
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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welcome

Welcome AC. I'm originally from Florida too.
So...you're an attorney! Good. We need some insight into the courtroom scenes. Shelley certainly seems to be saying something about what truths never make it to the surface. Poor Justine don't find no Justice. Tell us what you make of the courts here?
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Frequent Contributor
holley2001
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Question for Your Moderator

Wow, I'm a student and an employee at a university and I usually indulge over the summer and then take fall off when classes start up again, returning when the holidays come around and WOW! Is my head spinning with this new system. My question is: since I've obviously missed this discussion (for which I've been eagerly waiting - just didn't have time to check things out in the middle of the semester and missed it), any idea when you'll be doing this again? I love the book on many levels, and have been trying (in between work and study) to write a one-person play about Mary Shelley, and could really use this. If you have any idea when it will be offered again, I'd love to know so I can look for it. In the meantime, I'll try to get to used to using the new system!
Frequent Contributor
holley2001
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello Everyone

Hi, Amy Jean, Holley here, and I feel exactly the same way. Wish I hadn't missed this one. Any idea how long these posts stay here? Even if no one discusses any more, I'd like to read them. Enjoy the upcoming holidays!
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Hello Everyone



Bibliocrates wrote:
Thank you Ilana for directing me over here to introduce myself. I'm still trying to get the hang of this new format. Eek!

I'm a former BNU veteran and I'm very happy to see some familiar names on the board. Many of you know me as Amy Jean. I've been absent from these discussions for a while due to a hectic school schedule, but I'm back. I was shocked when I returned and discovered the change, but change is good!

I am looking forward to finally reading and discussing this book, which has been collecting dust on my bookshelf for quite some time.





Hi there Amy Jean - good to 'see' you again! How is your Mum?

Sorry you and Holley have missed Frankenstein - I think it ground to a halt because of difficulties folks were experiencing with the new system. This may change in December because Fanuzzir (Bob) has promised us that: 'Moby Dick will be incredibly structured, with a beginning, a middle and an end. People have been crying out for structure. That I can do. The discussion will begin 12/26, the day after the narrative of the novel is supposed to begin.' Bob is also moderating 'with structure' for Upton Sinclair's The Jungle which will be on the boards in January. Hopefully other Moderators will follow suit and some of the structure of the old BNU will return.
Blogger
IlanaSimons
Posts: 2,223
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
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Re: A Question for Your Moderator

Hi Holley2001,
We are wrapping up this Frankenstein discussion, but feel free to browse what's been said and add what you want.
We're still live here.
A British Classics session will be up, running long-term, in the next few weeks. We'll also feature a new classic book just about every month. So stay tuned, and thanks for your interest
Ilana



Ilana
Check out my book, here and visit my website, here.


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Question for Your Moderator



holley2001 wrote:
Wow, I'm a student and an employee at a university and I usually indulge over the summer and then take fall off when classes start up again, returning when the holidays come around and WOW! Is my head spinning with this new system. My question is: since I've obviously missed this discussion (for which I've been eagerly waiting - just didn't have time to check things out in the middle of the semester and missed it), any idea when you'll be doing this again? I love the book on many levels, and have been trying (in between work and study) to write a one-person play about Mary Shelley, and could really use this. If you have any idea when it will be offered again, I'd love to know so I can look for it. In the meantime, I'll try to get to used to using the new system!




Holleyk, as Ilana has posted that the Frankenstein group here is closing and if it is any help to you, Melissa has posted that her blog group knittheclassics.com are discussing Frankenstein. I don't knit but I love the way they are linking their craft projects to the books they are reading and the little knitted Frankenstein couple are a delight:smileyhappy::smileyhappy: Check them out!
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Good and evil

[ Edited ]
Just to add a quick note:

I believe Shelley intended the reader to pick up on this: good is what the creator wants; evil is what the creator does not want. Notions of good and evil ultimately arise from the original creator. So, as a creator, I do not want my creation to deviate too much farther from my own appearance(the good), but, Victor's creation deviated a little too much from the norm(the evil)- I could never love anything with electrodes coming out a head, or a hairdo like the bride of Frankenstein's. The monster was born in a world that did not have a good concept of friendship- people could not see beyond the monster's ugliness.

Chad

Message Edited by chad on 04-19-200709:53 AM

Frequent Contributor
historybuff234
Posts: 536
Registered: ‎02-08-2007
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Love and compassion; don't judge by appearances

I think that Shelley wanted the reader to think that you should not judge by appearnces. Also if Victor had shown the monster love and compassion the monster would not have caused so much pain to Victor, and caused his death. I also agree with chad.
The important thing, is to keep the important thing the important thing.
-Albert Einstein
Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Love and compassion; don't judge by appearances

... and it's difficult to have a friend that differs radically from yourself...I'm not sure this is the definition...

Chad
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