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Stephanie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Later Chapters Discussion: Tempest-Tossed

There are numerous correlations between The Book of Air and Shadows and Shakespeare's The Tempest. How many can you find? Harmony through balance is one of the The Tempest's key themes. Do you see that theme as relevant to the lives of the characters in to the various characters in the novel?.


Note: This discussion topic is particularly suitable for readers who have finished or nearly finished reading The Book of Air and Shadows. If you have not finished reading the book, this thread may contain plot spoilers.

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Stephanie
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katknit
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Re: Later Chapters Discussion: Tempest-Tossed



Stephanie wrote:
There are numerous correlations between The Book of Air and Shadows and Shakespeare's The Tempest. How many can you find? Harmony through balance is one of the The Tempest's key themes. Do you see that theme as relevant to the lives of the characters in to the various characters in the novel?.


Note: This discussion topic is particularly suitable for readers who have finished or nearly finished reading The Book of Air and Shadows. If you have not finished reading the book, this thread may contain plot spoilers.

Click on "Reply" to post your thoughts about this discussion topic, or click "New Message" on the main page to start a new topic thread.


Not exactly a response to your query, but I enjoyed the scenes where WS is questioning RB about his high seas adventure with an eye to enhancing his own writing. Many Shakespearean discussions focus upon WS' use of (and theft from) formal written histories
and other works both contemporary and older.
No two persons ever read the same book. [Edmund Wilson]
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Stephanie
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Re: Later Chapters Discussion: Tempest-Tossed


Not exactly a response to your query, but I enjoyed the scenes where WS is questioning RB about his high seas adventure with an eye to enhancing his own writing. Many Shakespearean discussions focus upon WS' use of (and theft from) formal written histories
and other works both contemporary and older.




I suppose I sort of place that in the category of making movies from books these days... except in that time, the theaters were filled with people of every ilk, from the high-born to the illiterate. Good way to learn your histories, I'd say.
Stephanie
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Fozzie
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Re: Later Chapters Discussion: Tempest-Tossed

OK, I cheated. I had not read The Tempest, but was curious about the correlations between it and The Book of Air and Shadows, so I read the Plot Overview and Themes, Motifs & Symbols sections of the Spark Notes on The Tempest on-line.

The first similarity that popped out at me was the name Miranda, a character in The Tempest. Other than the name, I didn’t find any connections between her and the Miranda in The Book of Air and Shadows.

In The Tempest, a character named Prospero escaped with his daughter, Miranda, and with “the books that are the source of his magic and power.” Books, or more accurately, manuscripts, are a source of power in The Book of Air and Shadows. People are frequently escaping with the manuscripts.

“The Tempest tells a fairly straightforward story involving an unjust act, the usurpation of Prospero’s throne by his brother, and Prospero’s quest to re-establish justice by restoring himself to power,” When I read this in Spark Notes, I thought of Jake and his brother, Paul, the former criminal who turned his life around and became a Jesuit priest. Towards the end of the book, I recall Jake being angry that he was not the “best” child anymore because Paul one upped him by becoming a priest. Even though neither of Jake’s and Paul’s parents were alive to witness Paul’s turnaround, the idea of it still bothers Jake.

“In The Tempest, the author is in the play.” That parallels The Book of Air and Shadows because Jake is in the story.

Spark Notes lists one of the themes as ‘the difficulty of distinguishing ‘men’ from ‘monsters.’” I think this could apply to The Book of Air and Shadows because we, as readers, are not quite sure who the bad guys are. The characters in the book aren’t sure either.

The idea of justice also seems to be a parallel. From what I could gather, in The Tempest, the definition of justice is not clear or fair. I don’t think that the idea of justice is always clear or fair in The Book of Air and Shadows. Paul’s idea of justice is not typical of a priest. I wish I could remember the details more clearly, but he overlooks a crime in order to get information from an informant or else commits a crime himself in order to get the information from the informant. The way Amalie treats Jake is interesting to think about with justice. By being very nice, she punishes Jake further for his indiscretions. The idea of justice also comes into play when thinking about the question of what crimes Carolyn and Al commit by breaking the books and selling and keeping parts of the manuscripts.

Well, that is my hodge podge of ideas. I hope some of you can add more ideas.
Laura

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