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Jessica
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Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Recommended Reading

More from Michael White

The Garden of Martyrs
Two Irish Catholic immigrants, headed for New York are arrested and accused of murder. After five months in jail, the trial, a mockery of justice, lasted only one day. The two were sentenced to be hanged. Father Cheverus, a Roman Catholic priest from France, is asked by Daley's wife and mother to go to the cell to comfort them, listen to their confessions, offer them communion.

Dream of Wolves
At 57, Doc Stuart Jordan, a transplanted Yankee, has spent nearly 30 years in Hubbard County, North Carolina, trying to understand and help the people of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Since the tragic death of his son 14 years earlier, he has thrown himself into his work, delivering babies by day and moonlighting as the medical examiner. He also is dedicated to caring for his wife, Annabel. Driven by drugs and her own private demons, she has become a street person, floating in and out of his life and wreaking havoc. When one night Doc is called to the scene of a brutal murder, little does he know how his fate will change.

Additional Recommended Reading

Cold Mountain
Charles Frazier
Sorely wounded and fatally disillusioned in the fighting at Petersburg, Inman, a Confederate soldier, decides to walk back to his home in the Blue Ridge mountains and to Ada, the woman he loved there years before. His trek across the disintegrating South brings him into intimate and sometimes lethal converse with slaves and marauders, bounty hunters and witches, both helpful and malign. At the same time, the intrepid Ada is trying to revive her father's derelict farm and learning to survive in a world where the old certainties have been swept away.

Uncle Tom's Cabin
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Nearly every young author dreams of writing a book that will literally change the world. A few have succeeded, and Harriet Beecher Stowe is such a marvel. Although the American anti-slavery movement had existed at least as long as the nation itself, this book galvanized public opinion as nothing had before. Its vivid dramatization of slavery’s cruelties so aroused readers that it is said Abraham Lincoln told Stowe her work had been a catalyst for the Civil War. Today the novel is often labeled condescending, but its characters -- Tom, Topsy, Little Eva, Eliza, and the evil Simon Legree -- still have the power to move our hearts, and Tom is actually American literature’s first black hero, a man who suffers for refusing to obey his white oppressors.

March
Geraldine Brooks
Brooks follows March, the absent father from Little Women, as he leaves behind his family to aid the Union cause in the Civil War. His experiences will utterly change his marriage and challenge his most ardently held beliefs. A lushly written, wholly original tale steeped in the details of another time, March secures Geraldine Brooks's place as a renowned author of historical fiction.

The Widow of the South
Robert Hicks
The title character of this haunting historical novel is Carrie McGavock, whose farmhouse was commandeered as a Confederate field hospital before the tragic battle at Franklin, Tennessee, in November 1864. That day, 9,000 soldiers perished. This tragic event turned McGavock into "the widow of the South." She spent the rest of her life mourning those lost, eventually reburying nearly 1,500 of them on her property. Robert Hicks's first historical novel captures the life-altering force that war exerts even on noncombatants.

Coal Black Horse
Robert Olmstead
Dispatched by his mother's ominous premonition, 14-year-old Robey Childs sets out on a dangerous quest to find his father who is fighting for the doomed Confederacy. The boy is given two talismans to keep him safe -- a reversible jacket (one side blue and one side gray) and a magnificent black stallion possessed of preternatural intelligence. The horse guides Robey through the ravaged countryside to the blood-soaked fields of Gettysburg, where he is transformed fundamentally and forever by what he sees and does.

Enemy Women
Paulette Jiles
For the Colleys of southeastern Missouri, the War between the States is a plague that threatens devastation, despite the family’s avowed neutrality. For eighteen-year-old Adair Colley, it is a nightmare that tears apart her family and forces her and her sisters to flee. The treachery of a fellow traveler, however, brings about her arrest, and she is caged with the criminal and deranged in a filthy women’s prison. But young Adair's interrogator, a Union major, falls in love with her and vows to return for her when the fighting is over. Before he leaves for battle, he bestows upon her a precious gift: freedom.

Gilead
Marilynne Robinson
In 1956, toward the end of Reverend John Ames's life, he begins a letter to his young son, an account of himself and his forebears. As a young man in Maine, Ames saw a vision of Christ bound in chains and came west to Kansas to fight for abolition: He "preached men into the Civil War," then, at age fifty, became a chaplain in the Union Army. Reverend Ames writes about the tension between his father -- an ardent pacifist -- and his grandfather, whose pistol and bloody shirts, concealed in an army blanket, may be relics from the fight between the abolitionists and those settlers who wanted to vote Kansas into the union as a slave state. And he tells a story of the sacred bonds between fathers and sons, which are tested in his tender and strained relationship with his namesake, John Ames Boughton, his best friend's wayward son.

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Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

I can recommend:
Garden of Martyrs
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Widow of the South

I did not like Gilead.

I own but have not read yet:
Cold Mountain
March
Enemy Women (Paulette Jiles' latest book, Stormy Weather, was excellent)

I don't know anything about Coal Black Horse. Does anyone?
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading



Fozzie wrote:
I can recommend:
Garden of Martyrs
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Widow of the South

I did not like Gilead.

I own but have not read yet:
Cold Mountain
March
Enemy Women (Paulette Jiles' latest book, Stormy Weather, was excellent)

I don't know anything about Coal Black Horse. Does anyone?




Thanks Laura for this info: I have read Cold Mountain and Enemy Women and loved both. I am so glad you mentioned her new book. I will put it on my list. I loved Enemy Women. It had alot of drama and suspense to it. Is Stormy weather a civil war **bleep** also?
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kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

Michael; I purchased your "Dream of Wolves yesterday and have read a few pages. Even a few, I know this will be a wonderful read. I have to finish up two I am reading and then I will start.
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Fozzie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading



kiakar wrote:


Is Stormy weather a civil war book also?



No, it takes place in Texas during the 1930's. It is peppered with lots of historical details and is a wonderful story about women during that time.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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ENG267
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎10-23-2007
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Re: Recommended Reading

Love and Valor: Intimate Civil War Letters Between Captain Jacob and Emeline Ritner. (Ed. Charles E. Larimer) Beautifully worded, meaningful correspondence covering everything from the horrors Jacob witnessed in battle to Emeline's struggles to run the farm without her husband. Their devotion to each other was limitless.
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MichaelCWhite
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎10-08-2007
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Re: Recommended Reading

Funny but I just had to reread A DREAM OF WOLVES as I was going over a screenplay that the Hollywood folks have written about the novel. I was very pleased with the treatment and faithfulness of the screenplay to the novel. I'm hoping that they start filming soon, or at least as soon as the writers' strike is over.

Hope you enjoy it.

Michael


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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


MichaelCWhite wrote:
Funny but I just had to reread A DREAM OF WOLVES as I was going over a screenplay that the Hollywood folks have written about the novel. I was very pleased with the treatment and faithfulness of the screenplay to the novel. I'm hoping that they start filming soon, or at least as soon as the writers' strike is over.

Hope you enjoy it.

Michael


Will it have the same title? We need to look for that when it comes out. :smileywink:
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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MichaelCWhite
Posts: 98
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Re: Recommended Reading

So far it has the same title. I'm hoping they don't change it.

Michael


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Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

Laura,

Would love to get your perspective on Cold Mountain once you've read it.
Stephanie
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Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

I don't remember if this has been mentioned before but is anyone familiar with the book The Known World? I just picked up a used copy today because it sounded good.
It's a story about a former slave who is now a black master and farmer who learns from the most powerful man in Manchester County, Virginia in the mid 1800's.
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Fozzie
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Re: Recommended Reading



Wrighty wrote:
I don't remember if this has been mentioned before but is anyone familiar with the book The Known World? I just picked up a used copy today because it sounded good.
It's a story about a former slave who is now a black master and farmer who learns from the most powerful man in Manchester County, Virginia in the mid 1800's.



I think it was briefly mentioned by me, somewhere...

The Known World is a wonderful book. I do have one tip though. There are about 30 characters introduced in the first 35 pages. I couldn't keep track, so I made my own character list. Once I did that, I was fine. I read the book when it first came out, and then did a discussion here. I seem to remember we suggested a table of contents and a character list be added to the paperback version. I think I remember hearing that one or both was, but don't take my word. I hope you enjoy the book!
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading

Deb,

Take your time reading The Known World. It's not a fast read at all, and you'll probably want to carve out large chunks of time to sit and read without interruption. Laura's right about those characters, too, there are quite a few! I think you'll really enjoy it. We had an excellent when we did the discussion a few years back.
Stephanie
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Recommended Reading


Stephanie wrote:
Deb,

Take your time reading The Known World. It's not a fast read at all, and you'll probably want to carve out large chunks of time to sit and read without interruption. Laura's right about those characters, too, there are quite a few! I think you'll really enjoy it. We had an excellent when we did the discussion a few years back.




Laura and Stephanie,
Thanks so much for your advice. That information is very helpful. I'm glad you mentioned the list of characters. I have the paperback version and although there isn't a table of contents there is a list of almost 50 characters. Unfortunately it's in the back of the book and if you wouldn't have mentioned it I probably wouldn't have noticed it until much too late. I look forward to reading it.
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