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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Marshall Fredericks and The Spirit of Detroit (247)

Marshall Fredericks and The Spirit of Detroit: page 247


http://info.detnews.com/history/story/index.cfm?id=159&category=people
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Re: HISTORY: Selected Mayors of Detroit including Jerome Cavanaugh

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Re: HISTORY: Governor George Romney

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Re: HISTORY: Opa

Believe it means good cheer, cheers, success.

Anyways..this site has a lot of great urls related to Greek heritage

http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=1,7,1,1,16
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: HISTORY: Opa



bentley wrote:
Believe it means good cheer, cheers, success.

Anyways..this site has a lot of great urls related to Greek heritage

http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=1,7,1,1,16




Is an Opa a dance as well?
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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Opa



PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:
Believe it means good cheer, cheers, success.

Anyways..this site has a lot of great urls related to Greek heritage

http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=1,7,1,1,16




Is an Opa a dance as well?




Paul, here is an article where the word is used. I think the Greeks shout out the word as they dance...so sometimes they call the dancing or music opa dance or opa music..but I think we need someone who is Greek to tell us for sure.


http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16129900&BRD=2605&PAG=461&dept_id=523946&rfi=6
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: HISTORY: Opa



bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:
Believe it means good cheer, cheers, success.

Anyways..this site has a lot of great urls related to Greek heritage

http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=1,7,1,1,16




Is an Opa a dance as well?




Paul, here is an article where the word is used. I think the Greeks shout out the word as they dance...so sometimes they call the dancing or music opa dance or opa music..but I think we need someone who is Greek to tell us for sure.


http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16129900&BRD=2605&PAG=461&dept_id=523946&rfi=6




Thanks, Bentley. I guess that's where I've heard it before -- during a dance -- and usually at festive occasions like weddings.
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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Puccini

In Middlesex, Madame Butterfly, a Puccini opera was often playing in the background when there were guests over visiting Milton and Tess.

The following url is about Puccini:

http://www.puccini.it/portale%20ing.htm
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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona

Definitely! There's a whole parallel Greek tragedy going on behind the central story with the names symbolically tying them to their counterparts.





bentley wrote:
I am beginning to believe that the names of the characters themselves have additional significance.

Desdemona (tragic figure)as in Othello

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona_%28Othello%29


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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona

[ Edited ]

JesseBC wrote:
Definitely! There's a whole parallel Greek tragedy going on behind the central story with the names symbolically tying them to their counterparts.





bentley wrote:
I am beginning to believe that the names of the characters themselves have additional significance.

Desdemona (tragic figure)as in Othello

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona_%28Othello%29







Yes, Eugenides is creating an American epic of Greek epic proportions (along the same lines of the Odyssey and Iliad); I guess in celebration of his Greek heritage and the Greek heritage of the Stephanides family.

Message Edited by bentley on 06-20-2007 02:46 PM
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Re: HISTORY: 1967 Fleetwood

[ Edited ]
page 254

1967 space aged Fleetwood: Page 254

http://adcache.collectorcartraderonline.com/10/5/0/86424150.htm

http://www.car-nection.com/yann/dbas_txt/Phocad67.htm

Message Edited by bentley on 06-20-2007 02:54 PM
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Re: HISTORY: Mavrodapne (page 269)

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Re: HISTORY: Flower Drum Song (the musical) (page 265)

Flower Drum Song: (page 265)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flower_Drum_Song
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Re: HISTORY: Karaghiozis puppet shows (page 268)

Greek puppet shows and Karaghiozis (page 268)


http://www.geocities.com/unimahellas/english/historical_eng.htm
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Re: HISTORY: Prairie style/school/architecture (page 254)

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Re: HISTORY: Judge Stephen Roth (desegregation) (page 254)

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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona

I remember thinking when I read Middlesex a couple years ago that it struck me as a modern re-telling of the story of the Minotaur -- the Minotaur is born half-man, half-beast, Theseus fools it by bringing cross-dressed children into the Labyrinth, the Obscure Object could be considered an Ariadne figure, Cal could even be considered the Theseus figure while Callie parallels the Minotaur, sexuality and identity being the Labyrinth itself.

There are so many references, though, that we could probably find parallels to many other Greek myths.





bentley wrote:

JesseBC wrote:
Definitely! There's a whole parallel Greek tragedy going on behind the central story with the names symbolically tying them to their counterparts.





bentley wrote:
I am beginning to believe that the names of the characters themselves have additional significance.

Desdemona (tragic figure)as in Othello

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona_%28Othello%29







Yes, Eugenides is creating an American epic of Greek epic proportions (along the same lines of the Odyssey and Iliad); I guess in celebration of his Greek heritage and the Greek heritage of the Stephanides family.

Message Edited by bentley on 06-20-2007 02:46 PM


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Paul_Hochman
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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona

[ Edited ]
That's a really interesting comparison, Jesse. So, Cal/Theseus actually kill offs the Minotaur/Callie. Really a fascinating thought.

So, would you say Desdemona is representative of Pasiphae or would it be Tessie?



JesseBC wrote:
I remember thinking when I read Middlesex a couple years ago that it struck me as a modern re-telling of the story of the Minotaur -- the Minotaur is born half-man, half-beast, Theseus fools it by bringing cross-dressed children into the Labyrinth, the Obscure Object could be considered an Ariadne figure, Cal could even be considered the Theseus figure while Callie parallels the Minotaur, sexuality and identity being the Labyrinth itself.

There are so many references, though, that we could probably find parallels to many other Greek myths.


Message Edited by PaulH on 06-22-2007 10:37 AM
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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona



JesseBC wrote:
I remember thinking when I read Middlesex a couple years ago that it struck me as a modern re-telling of the story of the Minotaur -- the Minotaur is born half-man, half-beast, Theseus fools it by bringing cross-dressed children into the Labyrinth, the Obscure Object could be considered an Ariadne figure, Cal could even be considered the Theseus figure while Callie parallels the Minotaur, sexuality and identity being the Labyrinth itself.

There are so many references, though, that we could probably find parallels to many other Greek myths.





bentley wrote:

JesseBC wrote:
Definitely! There's a whole parallel Greek tragedy going on behind the central story with the names symbolically tying them to their counterparts.





bentley wrote:
I am beginning to believe that the names of the characters themselves have additional significance.

Desdemona (tragic figure)as in Othello

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desdemona_%28Othello%29







Yes, Eugenides is creating an American epic of Greek epic proportions (along the same lines of the Odyssey and Iliad); I guess in celebration of his Greek heritage and the Greek heritage of the Stephanides family.

Message Edited by bentley on 06-20-2007 02:46 PM







Jesse,

That is very interesting about the Minotaur legend (it sort of fits when Calliope is reading Luce's report about the monster part).

I am in the stages of rereading this novel. There just is so much that I missed when I started reading the book that I have gone back to the beginning and am starting anew. Making sure that I am researching all that I missed before or skimmed over.

Of course, there has been a lot written about the Greek tragedy/epic attempt by Eugenides (probably because of his Greek heritage like you stated above as well) and he really did not hide that on the second page when he alludes to Homer and muses.

There is a chapter in the book also titled The Minotaur.

Bentley
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bentley
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Re: HISTORY: Desdemona



PaulH wrote:
That's a really interesting comparison, Jesse. So, Cal/Theseus actually kill offs the Minotaur/Callie. Really a fascinating thought.

So, would you say Desdemona is representative of Pasiphae or would it be Tessie?



JesseBC wrote:
I remember thinking when I read Middlesex a couple years ago that it struck me as a modern re-telling of the story of the Minotaur -- the Minotaur is born half-man, half-beast, Theseus fools it by bringing cross-dressed children into the Labyrinth, the Obscure Object could be considered an Ariadne figure, Cal could even be considered the Theseus figure while Callie parallels the Minotaur, sexuality and identity being the Labyrinth itself.

There are so many references, though, that we could probably find parallels to many other Greek myths.


Message Edited by PaulH on 06-22-2007 10:37 AM




If you are referring to the mother, then it would be Tessie...now I have to go over this legend...ay carumba as The Obscure Object would say. (smile)
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