Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Book as a Whole: Foreshadowing (Focus on the Fundamentals)



bentley wrote:.... but I also believe Changez might have been caught in the crossfire at the end; but died nonetheless especially if he tried to detain the American as the waiter was gesturing that he do. Obviously the waiter played an important role in what happened to Changez. Here was Changez once again caught between his two worlds and identities. Harmed in part by both.

Bentley




If the American killed Ch. in that instance his chances to escape were pretty slim if the waiter's gang really was after him :smileyvery-happy: Would a skilled agent act that way? I doubt it. There are more elegant and less risky ways to do away with unwanted people. But this is fiction and drama, it is a gestalt we are talking about.

ziki
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
0 Kudos

poem

To me it is pretty evident why the poem reminded you of the book. It contains many elements into which you can intrepret a meaningful symbolic connection.

Interesting.

ziki
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: The Book as a Whole: Foreshadowing

First, I doubt anybody on this forum knows what any agent would or would not do in a dangerous situation. I personally do not know any. Having said that, anybody armed is also dangerous and it is obvious that the American was armed. It was also stated that the waiter wanted Changez to detain the American and that is not a good idea in the best of circumstances. It spells trouble especially for the one who does not have the gun.

The American would defend himself no matter what. He could have had reinforcements back at his hotel; but even given that possibly he was alone and he would have killed anybody who tried to detain him. And a man with a gun could have killed Changez and his friends without any trouble unless they also had guns and then some folks would be killed in the crossfire...among them Changez I feared.

I would never have thought before the last scene that Changez really meant the American harm but if he did what the waiter suggested then he surely is dead. Some kind of altercation occurred at the end of the novel. I don't think the waiter wanted to give his tip back or to return the American's jacket which he never took off. So we cannot ignore what was stated in the novel.

I am always surprised how what is stated is often ignored. I believe that there is always room for interpretation but the waiter and his group definately were not a friendly group, were following them and wanted Changez to detain the American...all of that is clear.
Users Online
Currently online: 4 members 1,059 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: