Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
BN Editor
BookClubEditor
Posts: 546
Registered: ‎10-20-2006
0 Kudos

Introduce Yourself

Welcome to the Money & Careers Book Club!

Reply to this message to introduce yourself to other readers. Let us know what types of books you like the most in this subject, and don't forget to recommend your all-time favorites!

Frequent Contributor
Bulova
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello, my name is Caroline. On several occasions I've come to the conclusion that the basis of my relationship with finances is a rather emotional one. I look forward to being able to remedy this mindset and eventually gain more peace.
Frequent Contributor
emily_card
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi, I am Emily, the book club moderator for this topic. As with all of us who live in the real world, my finances have experienced and or reflected changing moments in my own life. While I have been fortunate to learn a lot about money and serve as an advisor to clients, I have also had moments when I could not help thinking This Cannot Be Happening to Me!

Let´s all share about our personal financial histories and informational needs here. For me, right now the biggest challenge is a 22 year old son still in college. That is hard when you also need to focus on retirement. Each age brings a new stage.

Where are you?

Best,

Emily
New User
twoyearplan
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-05-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

[ Edited ]
hi!
i'm ericka and am happy this book club is underway...i look forward to knowing and growing.

good day!

p.s. my husband and i have been married for only 5 years and have accomplished so much and STILL need to accomplish more in just that short amount of time...we knew absolutely nothing about finances at the time we met and, since i've started working at a financial institution, we've had our eyes opened in a great way.

Message Edited by twoyearplan on 01-06-200702:04 AM

...on the other hand, there are different fingers...
Frequent Contributor
emily_card
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Great to have you onboard! Emily
Contributor
allphall
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello,

I'm Allison from Texas. I have recently had a life changing event and I am excited to get my finaces in order.
New User
swierchris
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-19-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello All,

I enjoy personal finance books that contain stories.

Two of favorites are

The Richest Man In Babylon, and Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Using a line from Rich Dad Poor Dad, I am interested in getting money to work for me rather than me working for money.
Contributor
allphall
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself



swierchris wrote:
Hello All,

I enjoy personal finance books that contain stories.

Two of favorites are

The Richest Man In Babylon, and Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Using a line from Rich Dad Poor Dad, I am interested in getting money to work for me rather than me working for money.


Hello,

I have not read the Rich Dad, Poor Dad book yet. Do you recommend it?


Allison
Frequent Contributor
emily_card
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hey Allison,

I like the title and the concept is popular. Truthfully, I believe that most of us can learn more about what we need to do from understanding our own relationship with money which the book we are discussing here achieves. Of course, there are a lot of popular titles with "rich" in them, because everyone has the fantasy of getting rich. Why? American myth, American dream, game shows, lotto, etc.

Most of us won't be rich, even though the number of real estate millionaires has grown.

Most of us should count ourselves lucky if our finances don't get in the way of enjoying life. For me, that's a sane goal and attainable.

Being rich isn't that much fun. Most of my rich clients devote most of their time to thinking about money--and how not to lose it.

Best,

Emily
Moderator
Frequent Contributor
caroline88
Posts: 301
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Rich Dad, Poor Dad

Allison,

I have read this book and a few others by the same author. If you are hesitant, why don't you pick up a copy at your local library?

These books do open a few new windows of thinking but mostly on a highly conceptual level. I did not read one single thing about changing my actions that I could apply to my situation. So in that way, the books were rather disappointing. I would have borrowed them from the library but our libraries don't have them so my only choice was to buy them.

Babylon is a great book, but I like The Wealthy Barber better, because it gives more practical steps.

I am grateful for reading all these books because they have increased my wealth consciousness.

Caroline
Belief in your mission, greet life with a cheer
There's big work to do, and that's why you are here
~ Caroline
New User
swierchris
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-19-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

As stated in some of the other posts, Rich Dad Poor Dad will not give you specifics about finances or investing. However it gives you some tips that I found helpful.

One of the things that was mentioned in the book was people do not hesitate to pay a 15% tip for something a simple as a meal but they hesitate to pay 4% for help investing or selling a house.

Well that example described me to a tee, and has made me rethink my stance on paying for investment advice.

Chris, S
Author
SueFeitelberg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi!

I'm so glad to know that you're interested in getting your money to work for you, for that's exactly the point of The Net Worth Workout. In my book I talk abut this alot especially in the chapter on Investing. I'll show you can earn one percent more each year in your investment returns (and quite likely 2 or 3 percent. From that you will add years to your spending. In other words, if you can earn one percent more from your investments you could create an additional 10 years of spending.

I think you have excellent priorities because then you can spend more time with the people you care about doing the things you care about. What are some other things some of you would like to get out of this club?

Sue
Author
SueFeitelberg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi

I agree with Emily that the concept of a better quality of life, being happy and being rich do not equate to each other. I spend a fair amount of time in The Net Worth Workout giving examples of how you can save time handling your money and reduce the stress. Often we get stressed about it because we don't have a process and then feel guilty because we bought something we thought we shouldn't have.

Let's look at it from another approach. What if you were working with a nutritionist and knew that if you kept to about 1800 calories a day (assuming a healthy ratio of carbs, protein, fats etc) you would lose weight. If you had some chocolate chip cookies I dont think you would feel too bad if you kept to that 1800 range. Most of us don't use that type of thinking with our money. We may be so frugal we rarely allow ourselves to treat ourselves or perhaps we're constantly splurging and then feeling bad either way it feels stressful. It's why money is one of the top things couples fight about, they often have different philosophies about it.

What I hope you get from this club is a program you can use for the rest of your life where you find a balance with your money. Like food it's something you will be dealing with everydaty of your life so think about how do you want to deal with it for the next 20, 30, 40, 50 years?

Can you have create more wealth if you follow it? Yes, I absolutely believe you can and that can give you more flexibility and choices. But more than the money I hope it gives you more time and peace of mind. Go to the section on the Millionaire's Workout and you'll see how to start.
Author
SueFeitelberg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hi Chris,

Can you elaborate on your thoughts about paying for investment advice as they were and how you may look at it now?


Thanks it would be helpful to know

Sue
New User
simwrestler
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Rich Dad, Poor Dad

[ Edited ]
Rich Dad, Poor Dad really changed my life. That sounds corny, I know, but it did. It changed my entire outlook on life. The author, Robert Kiyosaki, may be a snake-oil salesman, and some of the information contained in his books is not even accurate, but nevertheless, the mindset the book promotes is revolutionary. I would highly recommend the book, but with a caveat: You have to be open-minded to a less than stellar writing style. The book is written so that people with an eighth-grade education could follow, and you might even find it a bit condescending. The "real-life" stories are obviously bogus, but if you can appreciate them as parables, this is of little importance.

As for The Richest Man in Babylon - this is a good book, but every volume of it I've ever seen is written in an old, smeared font that makes it difficult to read. It's a short book, but after starting it several times, I was never able to finish until I bought it on CD (at Barnes & Noble, on sale).

Message Edited by simwrestler on 01-27-200710:35 AM

New User
simwrestler
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

My name is Jason. I'm 28 years old, and I work from home as a freelance financial writer. After graduating college, I was hired as a stockbroker, but that life wasn't for me. Now my wife and I both work from home, which allows us to spend time with our new baby girl (five months old yesterday). I mostly write ebooks and web articles on the stock market, real-estate investing, and credit issues. I have ghostwritten published books - you would be surprised that some authors don't write a thing - they pawn the work off on shlubs like me! Anyway, I am developing an Internet-property-development company after-hours and on the weekends. I ran a fairly successful web business from 1999 through 2003 (I left college in 2000 and returned in 2005), but it crashed and burned in part due to my lack of financial education. I'm determined to do things right this time around!
New User
BIGfoot
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Hello everyone, my name is Russ & I did not know about these Barnes & Noble forums until this morning when I received an email invitation - & I’m glad I received it. I took a peek on the web to see if there were any discussions on my current passion: protecting & growing personal finances.

Specifically, I'd hoped there was a chat around a new book featured which I've read several times since receiving it on Christmas (it was high on my "Santa's list), namely, 'Covered Calls & LEAPS: A Wealth Option', by Joseph Hooper & Aaron Zalewski. I trust it fits in this forum as I did notice an entry mentioning another, more renowned, author on financial success: Robert Kiyosaki, who actually wrote a glowing Foreword of the Hooper/Zelewski title, labeling it "A brilliant book!"

I recently left “corporate America” to pursue full time devotion to growing our (my wife & my) financial assets & target an earlier-than-65 retirement. We have two sons in college, one doing graduate work now. We’re fortunate, indeed, they’ve chosen a high quality state school: UMASS to earn their degrees, as this approach has far lessened the financial impact on our current life & retirement plans ;-)

If anyone on this forum is interested in reading, studying, & perhaps even practicing, what appears to me to be an extraordinarily far-sighted strategy aimed at financial development, I would very much enjoy participating in such a dialog.

Two of my other favorites, each with their own unique, but nevertheless sensible, strategies are 'Rule #1' by Phil Town, & 'The Little Book That Beats the Market', by Joel Greenblatt.

Ancora Imparo…
Russ Badessa
Frequent Contributor
emily_card
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Dear Russ,

Glad to have you aboard. Please join us for the discussions.

Best,

Emily
Moderator
Author
SueFeitelberg
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re:Thank You

Hello Everyone!

I just wanted to thank you all for being a part of this book club! I really enjoyed talking to all of you and hope you stay in touch should you have any questions about your personal finances. Remember managing and growing your money is a process...it's a marathon not a sprint! I know by being here you care very deeply about this and wish you all the best!!

You can reach me at susan.feitelberg@chase.com

All the best!


Sue Feitelberg
New User
simwrestler
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce Yourself

Yes, Joel Greenblatt's Little Book That Beats the Market is great. More than the "Magic Formula" presented at the end, I liked the way he endeavored to explain stock ownership with his examples about the kid selling gum at school. These are lessons we should be taught in sixth grade.

But Greenblatt's first book, You Can Be a Stock-Market Genius (Even if You're Not That Smart) is probably my favorite stock book of all time. The strategies are considerably more complex, and in fact, seem to contradict the "Magic Formula" a little bit, but that book is really eye-opening. He wrote it for general audiences, but it didn't catch on until hedge-fund managers began treating it as their Bible. It's that good.
Users Online
Currently online: 44 members 278 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: