Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Agatha Christie Trivia

MailOnline - news, sport, celebrity, science and health stories

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2020452/Beach-mystery-Crime-writer-Agatha-Christie-Brits-sur...

 



 

 

Sporting success: Agatha Christie was among Britain¿s first ¿stand-up¿ surfers, research has revealed

Wave-writer: Crime novelist Agatha Christie was one of the first Brits to surf standing up

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2020452/Beach-mystery-Crime-writer-Agatha-Christie-Brits-sur...

 

She may have made waves in crime writing, but Agatha Christie also liked

to ride the waves as it is revealed the writer was one of the first Britons to try surfing. 

The writer didn’t stop at the first attempt either, as well as penning thriller novels that made her characters including Hercule Poirot and Jane Marple household names, she also mastered the art of the board becoming one of the first people to stand up surf. 

Researchers investigating the history of the sport were stunned to discover the writer’s hidden talents that were first fostered while on holiday in South Africa in 1922.

She took up body boarding initially, and then, when her husband Archie was offered a position to help organise a world tour to promote the British Empire Exhibition to be held in London in 1924, she took to the seas on a surf board. 

The couple left England in January 1922, leaving their newborn daughter in the care of her mother and sister.

They arrived in Cape Town, South Africa, in early February and immediately took to sea bathing at Durban, and were introduced to prone surfboard riding at the popular Muizenberg beach.

The party continued its tour through Australia and New Zealand before arriving in Honolulu on August 5, 1922. Agatha and her husband quickly took to riding surfboards at Waikiki.

While her contemporaries washed down cocktails, Christie rode the waves in Cape Town and Honolulu, succeeding in standing up on the board despite the larger boards and surf proving a tough test of their new skills. 

 
 
Surfing surprise: Pete Robinson, founder of the North Devon-based Museum of British Surfing, said the discovery about the author's pastime had come as a 'surprise'

Surfing surprise: Peter Robinson, founder of the Museum of British Surfing, said the discovery about the author's pastime had come as a 'surprise'

During her time in Hawaii, Agatha wrote in her autobiography: ‘I learned to become expert, or at any rate expert from the European point of view - the moment of complete triumph on the day that I kept my balance and came right into shore standing upright on my board!’

 

 

 

Researcher Pete Robinson, founder of the North Devon-based Museum of British Surfing, said the discovery about the author's pastime had come as a ‘surprise’.

He said: ‘In the early 1920s very few British people were surfing and the only one we know about earlier than her, standing up, was Prince Edward.’

‘It certainly shows a new aspect to her life - her passion for the sea and being a sporting young woman.

Christie wrote at the time: ‘The surf boards in South Africa were made of light, thin wood, easy to carry, and one soon got the knack of coming in on the waves.

‘It was occasionally painful as you took a nose dive down into the sand, but on the whole it was an easy sport and great fun.’

 
 
Beach mystery: In her autobiography Agatha Christie wrote of her 'moment of complete triumph' when she stood upright on her board

Beach mystery: In her autobiography Agatha Christie wrote of her 'moment of complete triumph' when she stood upright on her board

Hitting the sand wasn’t the only sore point though, Mr Robinson said the couple were badly affected by sunburn, cut feet from the coral and the near destruction of Agatha's silk bathing dress by the Waikiki surf.

To protect their feet, the couple bought soft leather boots and the writer’s flimsy costume was replaced by wool swimwear, described by the author as ‘a wonderful, skimpy emerald green wool bathing dress, which was the joy of my life, and in which I thought I looked remarkably well!’

The acclaimed author was something of a water baby, having spent her teenage years at Torquay where sea bathing was a common practise in the early 1900s but she took up surfing when the sport was in its infancy.

Surfing quickly became popular among Brits abroad, although it was slower to take off in the UK.

Although Christie wrote about surfing in her autobiography, news of her expertise has come as a surprise to the surfing community.

The Museum of British Surfing is to probe whether Christie continued surfing on returning to the UK.



Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

I remember reading about her surfing when she and Archie went to Hawaii!  I didn't realize it was so unusual, though.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

[ Edited ]

This happened awhile ago, but I only just came across the article:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/may/21/iran-agatha-christie-serial-kiler

 



Iran arrests 'Agatha Christie serial killer'

 

Woman accused of drugging, suffocating and robbing her victims was inspired by classic crime novels, police claim

 

Thursday 21 May 2009 

 

Agatha Christie, pictured in 1972

 

 

Police in Iran believe they have caught the country's first female serial killer and are claiming she has disclosed a literary inspiration behind her attempts to evade detection: the crime novels of Agatha Christie.

The 32-year-old suspect, named only as Mahin, stands accused of killing at least six people, including five women, according to officials in the city of Qazvin, about 100 miles north-west of Tehran.

"Mahin in her confessions has said that she has been taking patterns from Agatha Christie books and has been trying not to leave any trace of herself," Mohammad Baqer Olfat, the Qazvin prosecutor, told Iranian journalists.

Mahin, who it is claimed also admitted the earlier murders of her former landlord and an aunt, is said to have carefully chosen her victims, targeting elderly and middle-aged women and offering them lifts home after picking them up at shrines in the city where they had been praying.

Police said she confessed in custody to killing four such women in Qazvin since January, claiming to have been driven by a desperate need for money after chalking up debts of more than £16,000. After offering her victims a lift, Mahin allegedly gave them fruit juice which she had spiked with an anaesthetic to knock them out. She would then suffocate them before stealing their jewellery and other possessions and dumping the bodies in secluded spots. One victim was beaten to death with an iron bar after regaining consciousness.

Which Christie novels Mahin studied has not yet been revealed, though many of the books describe killers using drugs. Christie's novels, some of which depict unsolved murders, are highly popular among Iranians. The writer, who died in 1976, visited Iran several times and used it as the setting for one of her stories, The House at Shiraz.

Qazvin's police chief, Ali Akbar Hedayati, said Mahin was afflicted by a ­mental disorder triggered by having been deprived of her mother's love. She would draw her chosen victims into conversation by telling them they reminded her of her mother, the police chief said.

After apparently being so careful to stay ahead of the police, it seems that the most mundane of transgressions, a road traffic offence, alerted detectives and led to her arrest.

Officers first suspected the killer may have been a woman after studying a footprint found near one of the bodies. They were only led to Mahin after a 60-year-old woman, having read about the murders, told them she had escaped from a light-coloured Renault car after becoming suspicious of the female driver.

After checking cars matching that description, their attention was drawn to Mahin by records showing she had been fined following a recent road accident.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

This article is 11 years old. I wonder if anything happened with it?

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2000/dec/05/crime.agathachristie?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

 

Murder most foul

 

A terrible crime is about to be committed: Agatha Christie's books are to be filmed - with their setting changed to the present day. Somehow, Hercule Poirot with a mobile phone doesn't quite do it for Lindsay Duguid.

 

The Guardian, Tuesday 5 December 2000 

 

 

Agatha Christie's status as the queen of crime may be due to her ingenious plots, but her continuing popularity these days - especially with television producers - has more to do with something else: the decor. Written between 1920 and 1968, Christie's novels are fixed in our imagination in an era which is 20s, or perhaps 30s - but definitely "period". There is a charm in their set-pieces - the locked library, the French windows through which the maid overhears a quarrel, the footsteps on the gravel drive - and they are populated mostly by straightforward people, summed up by their creator with the sort of snap judgment which may contain an important clue. "Annie is the house parlourmaid. A nice girl but an inveterate talker"; "He was well-groomed, with a cheerful, somewhat vacuous face. Not a type that I admire."

Then there is the dialogue, only distantly related to natural speech. "Sorry. I - I didn't mean to startle you. I didn't know there was anyone here"; "Father, I'm going up to town in the Hispano. I can't stand the monotony down here any longer." On television, the gleaming cars, the cigarette holders, the backless frocks and the Marcel waves became part of the ritual; they allowed us to watch the unrolling of events a point or two above dozing.

Now this vision of Christie is under threat, from what she might have called a brash young American. Chorion Intellectual Properties, the holder of the Christie copyright, plans to bring some of her books up to date by setting them in "the microchip age", in the belief that "a modern setting will bring in a younger demographic".

Chorion also plans to "develop a licensing programme based on Christie's works and associated characters for the gift and collectable markets". But any upgrading of the technology would upset Christie's elaborate use of mechanical alibis, those intricate plots built up from chance overhearings and deceptions about time. Seven digital clock radios would not do the same job as the ticking alarm clocks used in the Seven Dials Mystery. The internet would provide Superintendent Battle of Scotland Yard with all the information he needed on subversive secret societies and all those letters - lost, hidden, delayed, read secretly - would have been replaced by email.

The very possibility of a mobile phone destroys the set-up for the telephone alibi - a Christie favourite. The phone call from an accomplice could not have been used to help the murderer in Lord Edgware Dies, and, if Lord Edgware had had a burglar alarm installed at his Regent's Park house instead of a bolted door, many red herrings would have been avoided.

The staple plot device of the locked room needs old-fashioned things: locks, a library, maids. Just as the important motives of scandal, blackmail and secret pasts need a society with an agreed code of behaviour. And there is, of course, a long list of supporting plot elements that simply no longer exist, from impassive butlers to steel millionaires to railways that stick to a timetable. Chorion's gifts and collectables will also be full of difficulties. Unlike the characters in the Sherlock Holmes stories, who come with a range of accessories, the only Christie character with distinctive features (pear shape, bowler hat, moustache, spats) is Poirot.

Apart from that, any franchising company would surely want those elaborate props - the oriental dagger, the box of poisoned chocolates, the clock that had been tampered with - that had been done away with in their updating.

If Christie is seen as ripe for commodification in the US, in Europe she is being deconstructed in an elegant but rigorous manner. Pierre Bayard, a psychoanalyst and a professor of literature at the University of Paris, has written a book, Who Killed Roger Ackroyd? (Fourth Estate), which casts doubt on whether Dr Sheppard really did murder the local squire. The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd (1926) is famous for having a narrator who turns out to be the murderer, having withheld vital information in his account of the happenings at the great house - a piece of narrative sleight of hand which has long fascinated the critics. "If the narrator of every novel is suspect then we can no longer rely on any part of the text," concludes Bayard, perhaps with slight exaggeration. Christie's original solution is not only unlikely, he argues, it has no proper motive. Bayard is interested in why Christie should have made this "error"; he also finds a relationship between the detective story and the deeper mysteries of the human mind: "Solutions to plots mask real answers."

Christie was a tireless producer of material for the imagination. Her novels are so sparely written that the reader rushes to fill in the gaps, and one of the reasons she has had such a successful afterlife is that later generations of readers can interpret her books to their liking. There have already been several academic examinations of her work. Like Chorion's plans to drag the novels into the 21st century, they are just another example of the fun to be had with icons of popular culture.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,237
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

Wow, that's kind of amazing, about that Iranian woman using Agatha Christie plot lines to actually kill!

I also strongly dislike the current trend of trying to "modernize" Christie. I've seen a few of those kinds of productions, and they just do not hold up to the older, more faithful to the original adaptations.

 

Anyway, I was reminded in our local paper yesterday that Agatha Christie's birthdate is right around the corner--September 15.

 

Do we have anything special planned to celebrate the date, becke?

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


Fricka wrote:

Wow, that's kind of amazing, about that Iranian woman using Agatha Christie plot lines to actually kill!

I also strongly dislike the current trend of trying to "modernize" Christie. I've seen a few of those kinds of productions, and they just do not hold up to the older, more faithful to the original adaptations.

 

Anyway, I was reminded in our local paper yesterday that Agatha Christie's birthdate is right around the corner--September 15.

 

Do we have anything special planned to celebrate the date, becke?


I think that I am going to read one of her books that I haven't read yet and it will be my way of thinking about her that day!

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

Last year we celebrated all month, but I haven't scheduled anything special this year. (I knew I might be going away for my anniversary, so I kept the second half of September kind of light.)

 

I think it would be fun if we did something special again. Any suggestions?

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,237
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


becke_davis wrote:

Last year we celebrated all month, but I haven't scheduled anything special this year. (I knew I might be going away for my anniversary, so I kept the second half of September kind of light.)

 

I think it would be fun if we did something special again. Any suggestions?


eadie has a good idea, but not all of us will be able to finish reading one of Agatha's books by her birthdate. Here's a couple of thoughts:

1. We could all discuss the first Agatha Christie book we ever read(or our favorite Chistie book, whichever makes more sense or we can remember)

2. We could discuss our favorite Christie detective

3. We could discuss which book settings of Christie books we like the best

 

Anyone else have some suggestions?

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


Fricka wrote:

becke_davis wrote:

Last year we celebrated all month, but I haven't scheduled anything special this year. (I knew I might be going away for my anniversary, so I kept the second half of September kind of light.)

 

I think it would be fun if we did something special again. Any suggestions?


eadie has a good idea, but not all of us will be able to finish reading one of Agatha's books by her birthdate. Here's a couple of thoughts:

1. We could all discuss the first Agatha Christie book we ever read(or our favorite Chistie book, whichever makes more sense or we can remember)

2. We could discuss our favorite Christie detective

3. We could discuss which book settings of Christie books we like the best

 

Anyone else have some suggestions?


Why not any or all of the above? We could let this run throughout the month - I'll start threads for these topics. Thanks!

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

Here is a quiz on alternative Christie titles, from an old book I have.  Maybe you can take turns answering them, to make it more fun.

 

  1. What was the original publishing title for An Overdose of Death?
    1. Dead Man's Folly
    2. Patriotic Murders
    3. Seven Dials Mystery
    4. Sparkling Cyanide
  2. Give the original publishing title for A Holiday for Murder.
  3. True or false?  The Hollow was the original title for Murder After Hours.
  4. What was the original publishing title for The Mousetrap?
  5. What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw has an alternative British title.  What is it?
  6. The Mirror Crack'd is also known as _ _ _ _ _ _ _. (7 words)
  7. So Many Steps to Death is also known as _ _. (2 words)
  8. Murder with Mirrors was originally known as _ _ _ _ _. (5 words)
  9. True or false?  The original publishing title of Easy to Kill was Murder Is Easy.
  10. Remembered Death was originally presented as _ _. (2 words)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

I'll take #5: WHAT MRS. MCGILLICUDDY SAW is also called THE 4:50 FROM PADDINGTON.

 

What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! (Miss Marple Series) 

4 50 from Paddington (Miss Marple Series)   

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


becke_davis wrote:

I'll take #5: WHAT MRS. MCGILLICUDDY SAW is also called THE 4:50 FROM PADDINGTON.

 

What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw! (Miss Marple Series) 

4 50 from Paddington (Miss Marple Series)   



Correct, Becke (of course)!

 

I knew 8 out of 10.

 

I'm hoping that Ryan sees this and can answer #6. :smileywink:

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

[ Edited ]
Overdose of Death = Patriotic Murders or One Two Buckle my Shoe
Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


eadieburke wrote:
Overdose of Death = Patriotic Murders or One Two Buckle my Shoe

This one was made into a PBS movie:

 

Poirot: One, Two, Buckle My Shoe  

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


eadieburke wrote:
Overdose of Death = Patriotic Murders or One Two Buckle my Shoe


Correct, Eadie, and a bonus for giving the third title (which is not listed in this book, but I think that's the one I have it under)!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Inspired Wordsmith
basson_mommy12
Posts: 743
Registered: ‎05-27-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


dulcinea3 wrote:

Here is a quiz on alternative Christie titles, from an old book I have.  Maybe you can take turns answering them, to make it more fun.

 

  1. What was the original publishing title for An Overdose of Death?
    1. Dead Man's Folly
    2. Patriotic Murders
    3. Seven Dials Mystery
    4. Sparkling Cyanide
  2. Give the original publishing title for A Holiday for Murder.
  3. True or false?  The Hollow was the original title for Murder After Hours.
  4. What was the original publishing title for The Mousetrap?
  5. What Mrs. McGillicuddy Saw has an alternative British title.  What is it?
  6. The Mirror Crack'd is also known as _ _ _ _ _ _ _. (7 words)
  7. So Many Steps to Death is also known as _ _. (2 words)
  8. Murder with Mirrors was originally known as _ _ _ _ _. (5 words)
  9. True or false?  The original publishing title of Easy to Kill was Murder Is Easy.
  10. Remembered Death was originally presented as _ _. (2 words)

I'll save #6 for Ryan, but that was the first Christie I ever read. The answer to #2:

 

Hercule Poirot's Christmas   This is the book I picked up randomly at B&N a couple of years back that got me started on the quest to read all of her books.

"The Answer to the Great Question of ... Life, the Universe and Everything ... (is) 42." -- Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

Ruth W.
Grand Rapids, MI
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

[ Edited ]
#3 True - The Hollow (1946) was the original title for Murder After Hours (1954).
Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

Both correct, Ruth and Eadie!

 

Bonus - Although Hercule Poirot's Christmas is an alternative title for A Holiday for Murder, it is not the title listed in the quiz book.  What is the third title?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia


dulcinea3 wrote:

Both correct, Ruth and Eadie!

 

Bonus - Although Hercule Poirot's Christmas is an alternative title for A Holiday for Murder, it is not the title listed in the quiz book.  What is the third title?


The other title is Murder for Christmas.

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Agatha Christie Trivia

That's right, Eadie!

 

I think the one I have is A Holiday for Murder (too lazy to go look).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia