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American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

I'm posting this a little late to stagger our two features, and to give you more time to read Mignon G. Eberhart's books. We added her to the schedule by popular request. I've read a lot of her books, but it's been quite awhile since I read them. I know my mom likes her, too.

 

http://www.mignoneberhart.com/

 

 

"Mignon Eberhart's name on mysteries is like sterling on silver." 
-Miami News

 

Biography

A writing life


Born July 6, 1899 in Lincoln, Nebraska, Mignon Good received her degree from Nebraska Wesleyan University.

Publishing her first novel Patient in Room 18 in 1929, Mignon Good Eberhart penned over 50 novels and numerous short stories, many of which have been adapted for film and television. In 1971, she received the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America. She is also a past president of the Mystery Writers of America.

She began to write in her early teens, "mainly," she says, "because I preferred writing to studying Caesar's Commentaries and algebra. There was one halcyon period during which I traded work on English themes for the solution of geometry problems, with an obliging classmate, but, perhaps for the best, this was very brief. There was a long novel to which I could add chapters at will, and numerous plays, all of which were advisedly destroyed. In my early twenties I gathered up courage and postage stamps and sent a book-length typescript to an editor. It was accepted. The story was a murder mystery and thus started me on a hard but rewarding writing path. The writer hopes that a mystery novel is entertaining to read but it is not easy to write."
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Eberhart, Mignon G

http://gadetection.pbworks.com/w/page/7930503/Eberhart,%20Mignon%20G

 

Page historylast edited by Jon 2 months, 4 weeks ago
 
 

Mignon G EberhartMignon Good (1899-1996) was born in Lincoln, Nebraska. She studied at Nebraska Wesleyan University from 1917 to 1920. In 1923 she married Alanson C. Eberhart, a civil engineer. After working as a freelance journalist, she decided to become a full-time writer. In 1929 her first crime novel was published featuring 'Sarah Keate', a nurse and 'Lance O'Leary', a police detective. This couple appeared in another four novels. In the Forties, she and her husband divorced. She married John Hazen Perry in 1946 but two years later she divorced him and remarried her first husband. Over the next forty years she wrote a novel nearly every year. In 1971 she won the Grand Master award from the Mystery Writers of America. She also wrote many short stories featuring banker/amateur sleuth James Wickwire (who could be considered a precursor to Emma Lathen's John Putnam Thatcher) and mystery writer/amateur sleuth Susan Dare.

 

Bibliography

For the most exhaustive and authoritative Eberhart bibliography on the planet (even better than the one in this wiki), visithttp://www.richardaylesworth.ca/eberhart/ .


 

Commentators have noted that ME's novels fall into two groups: the Whodunits with nurse/amateur sleuth Sarah Keate; and the Romances, which have no serial characters (except for Chicago policeman Jacob Wait who appeared a few times).

 

ROMANCE

What I have not seen mentioned is the fact that the romances all have the same core plot. A young attractive woman finds herself married to, or engaged to be married to, the WRONG MAN. A strong handsome alternative love comes along, sometimes anew, sometimes from her past, and wins her heart. The extraneous husband/fiance is conveniently disposed of either by being the victim of the murder, or by being the murderer.

 

The fact that she wrote some forty-odd books with the identical theme suggests she spent her entire lifetime working out on paper her feelings about Mr. Eberhart.  A reading of her biography, America's Agatha Christie, provides confirmation for my thesis.

 

DETECTION

There is very little detection in ME's novels, except by the police, mostly offstage. Even Sarah Keate, the supposed amateur sleuth, functions more as a narrator than anything else. Except for some minor ineffectual snooping, she rarely contributes anything significant to the solution of the crime.

 

In the romances the heroine was largely of the helpless sort, needing to be rescued by the Big Strong Man. As Eberhart aged, her heroine gradually became a bit more spunky and sometimes even raised a finger to help herself. But amateur detective she was not. Mostly she stood around wringing her hands, going over and over the possibilities, and saying "it COULDN'T BE so-and-so".

 

The unravelling of the mysteries in ME's novels happens mainly through successive revelations, not by any serious detection. The short stories are another matter. Susan Dare and James Wickwire can actually claim the status of amateur detective.

 

RKA

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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

http://gadetection.pbworks.com/w/page/7930503/Eberhart,%20Mignon%20G

 

Mike Grost on Mignon G Eberhart

 

Suspense passages in Eberhart often show the heroine with a heightened sensory awareness of her surroundings, and are almost hallucinatory in their intensity. Sometimes these concern the heroine's driving during bad weather: see the thunderstorm in "Murder Goes to Market" (1943), and the fog in Chapters 1 and 2 of The Dark Garden (1933). There can be unusual effects of hearing as well: see the humming and the Gombies and their music in "Bermuda Grapevine" (1938). These passages are written with remarkable literary skill. The Dark Garden evokes modern art to describe both the effects of the fog, and the buildings that the fog conceals. Clearly, Eberhart felt that modern art was a high energy expression of powerful social and cultural forces, currents affecting the lives of everyone in society. She also conveyed the idea that it was a little frightening, involving the breakdown of normal perception, and the transfer of the viewer to a different kind of consciousness. The Dark Garden uses all the senses to express the heroine's perceptions: hearing, sight, touch and heat and cold perception. It also uses words: the strange sentence the heroine hears out of the fog. This sentence seems completely nonsensical. It derives from the forms of modernist literature, such Symbolist influenced writers as T.S. Eliot and, especially, Gertrude Stein.

 

Eberhart's view of modern architecture also includes the technological forces used to build it, and the laws of physics that lay behind them. Like Rinehart and most of the HIBK writers, she was fascinated by science and technology. In a memorable passage, Eberhart describes the world as being built up out of energy. This is both scientifically sound, and an almost mystic vision of a hidden reality under the everyday appearance of things.

 

If The Dark Garden draws on Modernism, both literary and visual, to express its altered states of perception, it also builds upon the Golden Age mystery, HIBK concern with landscape architecture. The estate in the book is drawn with the complex geographical patterns of the classic mystery tradition. Nor is the drive into the estate from downtown Chicago separated from the landscape architecture of the estate itself. On each stage of the drive, Eberhart supplies precise geographical coordinates, showing her heroine's progress through the city and the fog. This turns both the cityscape of the drive, and the estate it finally reaches, into one large geographic entity, described with the full precision of Golden Age mystery's fascination with landscape. Similarly, the architecture of the hotel in "Bermuda Grapevine" (1938) plays a key role in the plot. Eberhart's stories often open with a landscape, showing the scene where the crime will take place. This landscape often shows the route and means of arrival: how people actually come to the landscape itself. This arrival route is an integral part of the landscape. It often shows vivid weather: the train and car journey through a blizzard in Nebraska's Sand Hills in The Mystery of Hunting's End (1930), the foggy roads leading to the estate in The Dark Garden (1933), the boat journey through the lake in The Pattern (1937). Such transportation is natural in the early parts of stories - after all, the characters have to get there somehow, as part of their entrance into the narrative. But Eberhart often makes such routes a key part of the landscape itself, one that adds to the complexity of the overall pattern.

 

The House on the Roof (1934-1935) is a non-series novel. Its best part is its opening chapter, depicting the heroine's visit with a retired opera star. This grand dame and her music are vividly conveyed. Such opera singers are far more commonly found in Agatha Christie, than in HIBK writers, who tend to avoid the arts in favor of science, technology and politics. Eberhart made a mistake in not having this colorful lady appear after the opening chapter. The singer's penthouse apartment, the "house on the roof" of the title, also typifies the Golden Age's love of spectacular architecture. The music, and the stifling heat and perfumes of the penthouse, do convey a different world of perception in the Eberhart tradition.

 

Eberhart's The Unknown Quantity (1953) mixes spy and thriller elements in with its mystery puzzle plot. The book starts out terrifically, and Chapters 1 - 7 are full of imaginative plotting. From this point on, however, thriller elements unfortunately begin to prevail over plot. Eberhart eventually provides some logical and fairly inventive solutions to her mysteries, but these are embedded in long drawn out suspense passages of little interest.

 

The Sarah Keate novels

 

Eberhart began her mystery career with a series of novels featuring nurse Sarah Keate and police detective Lance O'Leary. They are not exactly a team - they keep stumbling against each other accidentally when Sarah's nursing cases turn into murder mysteries. None of the books is a triumph, considered as a pure puzzle plot mystery. Yet several of them have opening sections with imaginative storytelling. Sarah tends to be the central character of the stories, as well as the narrator. She often takes care of helpless young male patients in a female, nurse-run world: a reversal of the social roles often prescribed for men and women of the era. The first five Sarah Keate books appeared at the start of Eberhart's career (1929-1932); the last two followed after long intervals. There is also at least one short story about the character, "The Old Man's Diamond", which appears in Mignon G. Eberhart's Best Mystery Stories.

 

The Patient in Room 18 (1929) is Eberhart's first mystery novel. It is not very inspired. The excellent 1938 film version is discussed in the article on its director, Crane Wilbur.

 

Bland

 

Eberhart wrote three American Magazine novellas about Bland, a butler and amateur detective: "Deadly is the Diamond" (1942), "Murder Goes to Market" (1943) and "Murder in the Garden" (1945). Bland's "Watson" is his employer, a refined middle-aged society lady who is a nice person, but clueless about solving the murder cases into which she keeps stumbling . Although this sounds like a formula for screwball comedy, the tales actually tend to be fairly solemn, in the HIBK mode. In "Murder Goes to Market" we learn that the woman narrator is a writer, like Eberhart's short story detective, Susan Dare - and Eberhart herself.

 

"Deadly is the Diamond" is a story about a seeming curse on a fabulous diamond, and is full of atmosphere. It can make good escapist reading. Eberhart is especially good at keeping sinister, unexpected events coming. There are also some decent mystery ideas here. The diamond recalls the real life Jonker diamond, discovered in the 1930's. A fine short film, The Jonker Diamond (1936), directed by Jacques Tourneur, describes three stages in the Jonker's history: its discovery in a remote region of the world; its purchase by a jewel dealer in New York; and its cutting by experts into a series of smaller stones. All three of these phases play a role in Eberhart's plot.

 

"Murder Goes to Market" is set in that then new concept, the supermarket. The supermarket, like the diamond cutting business in "Deadly is the Diamond", and the hospitals of some of the Sarah Keate tales, exemplifies Eberhart's interest in complex institutions.

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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

http://gadetection.pbworks.com/w/page/7930503/Eberhart,%20Mignon%20G

 

Mike Grost on Mignon G Eberhart

 

Suspense passages in Eberhart often show the heroine with a heightened sensory awareness of her surroundings, and are almost hallucinatory in their intensity. Sometimes these concern the heroine's driving during bad weather: see the thunderstorm in "Murder Goes to Market" (1943), and the fog in Chapters 1 and 2 of The Dark Garden (1933). There can be unusual effects of hearing as well: see the humming and the Gombies and their music in "Bermuda Grapevine" (1938). These passages are written with remarkable literary skill. The Dark Garden evokes modern art to describe both the effects of the fog, and the buildings that the fog conceals. Clearly, Eberhart felt that modern art was a high energy expression of powerful social and cultural forces, currents affecting the lives of everyone in society. She also conveyed the idea that it was a little frightening, involving the breakdown of normal perception, and the transfer of the viewer to a different kind of consciousness. The Dark Garden uses all the senses to express the heroine's perceptions: hearing, sight, touch and heat and cold perception. It also uses words: the strange sentence the heroine hears out of the fog. This sentence seems completely nonsensical. It derives from the forms of modernist literature, such Symbolist influenced writers as T.S. Eliot and, especially, Gertrude Stein.

 

Eberhart's view of modern architecture also includes the technological forces used to build it, and the laws of physics that lay behind them. Like Rinehart and most of the HIBK writers, she was fascinated by science and technology. In a memorable passage, Eberhart describes the world as being built up out of energy. This is both scientifically sound, and an almost mystic vision of a hidden reality under the everyday appearance of things.

 

If The Dark Garden draws on Modernism, both literary and visual, to express its altered states of perception, it also builds upon the Golden Age mystery, HIBK concern with landscape architecture. The estate in the book is drawn with the complex geographical patterns of the classic mystery tradition. Nor is the drive into the estate from downtown Chicago separated from the landscape architecture of the estate itself. On each stage of the drive, Eberhart supplies precise geographical coordinates, showing her heroine's progress through the city and the fog. This turns both the cityscape of the drive, and the estate it finally reaches, into one large geographic entity, described with the full precision of Golden Age mystery's fascination with landscape. Similarly, the architecture of the hotel in "Bermuda Grapevine" (1938) plays a key role in the plot. Eberhart's stories often open with a landscape, showing the scene where the crime will take place. This landscape often shows the route and means of arrival: how people actually come to the landscape itself. This arrival route is an integral part of the landscape. It often shows vivid weather: the train and car journey through a blizzard in Nebraska's Sand Hills in The Mystery of Hunting's End (1930), the foggy roads leading to the estate in The Dark Garden (1933), the boat journey through the lake in The Pattern (1937). Such transportation is natural in the early parts of stories - after all, the characters have to get there somehow, as part of their entrance into the narrative. But Eberhart often makes such routes a key part of the landscape itself, one that adds to the complexity of the overall pattern.

 

The House on the Roof (1934-1935) is a non-series novel. Its best part is its opening chapter, depicting the heroine's visit with a retired opera star. This grand dame and her music are vividly conveyed. Such opera singers are far more commonly found in Agatha Christie, than in HIBK writers, who tend to avoid the arts in favor of science, technology and politics. Eberhart made a mistake in not having this colorful lady appear after the opening chapter. The singer's penthouse apartment, the "house on the roof" of the title, also typifies the Golden Age's love of spectacular architecture. The music, and the stifling heat and perfumes of the penthouse, do convey a different world of perception in the Eberhart tradition.

 

Eberhart's The Unknown Quantity (1953) mixes spy and thriller elements in with its mystery puzzle plot. The book starts out terrifically, and Chapters 1 - 7 are full of imaginative plotting. From this point on, however, thriller elements unfortunately begin to prevail over plot. Eberhart eventually provides some logical and fairly inventive solutions to her mysteries, but these are embedded in long drawn out suspense passages of little interest.

 

The Sarah Keate novels

 

Eberhart began her mystery career with a series of novels featuring nurse Sarah Keate and police detective Lance O'Leary. They are not exactly a team - they keep stumbling against each other accidentally when Sarah's nursing cases turn into murder mysteries. None of the books is a triumph, considered as a pure puzzle plot mystery. Yet several of them have opening sections with imaginative storytelling. Sarah tends to be the central character of the stories, as well as the narrator. She often takes care of helpless young male patients in a female, nurse-run world: a reversal of the social roles often prescribed for men and women of the era. The first five Sarah Keate books appeared at the start of Eberhart's career (1929-1932); the last two followed after long intervals. There is also at least one short story about the character, "The Old Man's Diamond", which appears in Mignon G. Eberhart's Best Mystery Stories.

 

The Patient in Room 18 (1929) is Eberhart's first mystery novel. It is not very inspired. The excellent 1938 film version is discussed in the article on its director, Crane Wilbur.

 

Bland

 

Eberhart wrote three American Magazine novellas about Bland, a butler and amateur detective: "Deadly is the Diamond" (1942), "Murder Goes to Market" (1943) and "Murder in the Garden" (1945). Bland's "Watson" is his employer, a refined middle-aged society lady who is a nice person, but clueless about solving the murder cases into which she keeps stumbling . Although this sounds like a formula for screwball comedy, the tales actually tend to be fairly solemn, in the HIBK mode. In "Murder Goes to Market" we learn that the woman narrator is a writer, like Eberhart's short story detective, Susan Dare - and Eberhart herself.

 

"Deadly is the Diamond" is a story about a seeming curse on a fabulous diamond, and is full of atmosphere. It can make good escapist reading. Eberhart is especially good at keeping sinister, unexpected events coming. There are also some decent mystery ideas here. The diamond recalls the real life Jonker diamond, discovered in the 1930's. A fine short film, The Jonker Diamond (1936), directed by Jacques Tourneur, describes three stages in the Jonker's history: its discovery in a remote region of the world; its purchase by a jewel dealer in New York; and its cutting by experts into a series of smaller stones. All three of these phases play a role in Eberhart's plot.

 

"Murder Goes to Market" is set in that then new concept, the supermarket. The supermarket, like the diamond cutting business in "Deadly is the Diamond", and the hospitals of some of the Sarah Keate tales, exemplifies Eberhart's interest in complex institutions.

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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

http://www.girl-detective.net/eberhart.html

 

Mignon G. Eberhart:
Death and the Maiden

 


At midnight Jenny Vleedam was awake and haunted by things she hadn't done and now would never have a chance to do, when the telephone rang. She knew that it was Peter calling her for he called at odd hours, anytime; she also knew that this, now, was the time to refuse to answer.

Call After Midnight (1964)

Although these days she rarely turns up on Best Reads of the Year lists, Mignon Good Eberhart was once the third highest paid female mystery writer (right next to Agatha Christie and Mary Roberts Rinehart. In addition to more than sixty novels (including a number of historical mysteries), she wrote short stories, novellas, plays--even one screen play (the 1939 film The Murder of Dr. Harrigan). She was called “America's Agatha Christie,” but her real contribution is not to the classic mystery form but the direction and development of the Romantic Suspense sub-genre.

A terrified girl on a mysterious night flight-destination: murder…

A terrified beauty-a lonely road at midnight-murder and mystery…

For the pretty young guest, violent death waited amid the fog-shrouded trees of the Petrie estate...

A lovely heiress encircled by murder and terror...

She was rich, beautiful-and ripe for killing...

A lovely bride-a perfect wedding-a flawless setting for murder...

A beautiful woman on a murder ship-a spellbinding voyage into mystery and terror...

Get the idea? She may have been a Golden Age mystery writer, but Mignon G. Eberhart was no Agatha Christie.

This is not a criticism. As much as I love Christie -- and admire Rinehart (who Eberhart more closely resembled both stylistically and psychologically), I adore the nutty romantic elements of Eberhart. The beautiful (usually) girl, the glamorous often exotic setting, the troubled romance, the eerie atmosphere, the clothes, the old money, the creepy relatives, the convoluted motives. What's not to love?

You have to be in the right mood to read Eberhart. Though plucky and well-bred, her heroines are some of the silliest in the mystery genre. The anonymous phone call bidding her hightail it down to the boathouse where murder has struck once before? She always answers on the first ring. Strange sounds in the attic of a house where murder walks the shadowy corridors? Sure, she's got five minutes to--er--kill; she'll just powder her nose and be right up. The smoking gun or bloody knife beside the still warm body? Never does the Eberhart heroine fail to pick it up and press her dainty little fingerprints all over it. Forget about the HIBK (Had I But Known) school, these chicks are at the top of the Why The Hell Would She class. They never have a decent alibi and they always have motive galore.

So she heard the rustle and rasping of palmettos near her; she heard it and tried to escape the entangling harsh leaves, but not in time. A blinding crash neatly and instantly blotted everything out in pain and blackness.

Unidentified Woman (1943)

Did I mention the Eberhart heroine gets knocked out a lot? They give dear concussed Nancy Drew a run for permanent brain-damage. They also frequently faint.

So you're probably wondering what it is I so enjoy about these books? (Or, if you're one of the critics who finds my own Grace Hollister a little lacking in judgment, you probably think, Ah ha!). Well, for one thing, Eberhart is an excellent writer. I'm talking about her prose here. It's clean, it's effective, it's evocative.

The room was bare and hot and bright with electricity. Mina, in that incongruous ivory satin, sat down at her tall desk and drew a fat checkbook forward.

Katie stood quite still in her slim lace gown. She felt queer-the wine had been old and too fiery. It was nauseating. No, it wasn't that-it was something wrong in the room. Something wrong-

The Dark Garden (1933)

The writing is spare but almost lyrical.

Another of Eberhart's strengths is characterization. This is an area where many of the Golden Age writers are flawed, creating ciphers to people their elaborate puzzles rather than believable characters. Eberhart's characters come complete with psychology-you may believe it is aberrant psychology, but they have genuine and believable motives for everything they do. After all, people in real life behave in exasperating ways too.

Eberhart herself was a lovely and well-traveled woman who wrote more as an anti-dote to boredom and possible husbandly neglect than a need to earn her living. She had no children. In 1946 she divorced her husband of some twenty odd years to marry another man--who she divorced two years later to remarry Alanson Eberhart. Kind of sounds familiar, doesn't it?
I also admire her longevity: she wrote from 1929 thru 1988--and her productivity. She turned out a novel a year in addition to teaching and working on other projects--and her work is overall consistent in quality. Some of the plots may have been screwier than others, but the writing holds up, and her inventiveness in creating eerie settings and fraught atmosphere is unflagging.

Michael E. Grost of the A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection site writes: “Suspense passages in Eberhart often show the heroine with a heightened sensory awareness of her surroundings, and are almost hallucinatory in their intensity.” Well, one man's hallucination is another woman's vivid imagination.

Eberhart is the classic escapist chick fic read. The books are always as much about the course of true love as the unraveling of a terrifying mystery. In the end, justice will triumph and love will find a way.

Yes, it was inevitable this return to Nice. But Richard and I can go now, anywhere we choose; we can return home when we like and there will be no whispers, no lingering doubts, no danger.We'll dance tonight and have champagne but pause for a moment when the New Year comes in and perhaps remember. Then the lights and the music will come up again.

R.S.V.P. Murder (1965)

THE NOVELS OF MIGNON EBERHART

The Patient in Room 18 (1929; Sarah Keate and Lance O’Leary)

The Mystery of Hunting’s End (1930; Sarah Keate and Lance O’Leary)

While the Patient Slept (1930; Sarah Keate and Lance O’Leary)

From This Dark Stairway (1931; Sarah Keate and Lance O’Leary)

Murder by an Aristocrat (1932; Sarah Keate and Lance O’Leary)

The Dark Garden (1933; also known as 'Death in the Fog")

The White Cockatoo (1933; also known as "Murder of My Patient")

The House on the Roof (1935)

Fair Warning (1936)

Danger in the Dark (1937; also known as "Danger in the Dark")

The Pattern (1937)

The Glass Slipper (1938)

Hasty Wedding (1938)

Brief Return (1939

The Chiffon Scarf (1939)

The Hangman’s Whip (1940)

Speak No Evil (1941)

Strangers in Flight (1941)

With This Ring (1941)

Wolf in Man’s Clothing (1942; Sarah Keate)

The Man Next Door (1943)

Unidentified Woman (1943)

Escape the Night (1944)

Wings of Fear (1945)

Five Passengers from Lisbon (1946)

The White Dress (1946)

Another Woman’s House (1947)

Pattern of Murder (1948; also known as The Pattern)

House of Storm (1949)

Hunt with the Hounds (1950)

Deadly Is the Diamond (1951)

Never Look Back (1951)

Dead Men’s Plans (1952)

The Unknown Quantity (1953)

Man Missing (1954; Sarah Keate)

Postmark Murder (1956)

Another Man’s Murder (1957)

Melora (1959; also known as "The Promise of Murder")

Jury of One (1960)

The Cup, the Blade or the Gun (1961; also known as "The Crime at Honotassa")

Enemy in the House (1962)

Run Scared (1963)

Call After Midnight (1964)

R.S.V.P. Murder (1965)

Witness at Large (1966)

Woman on the Roof (1967)

Message from Hong Kong 1969)

El Rancho Rio (1970)

The House by the Sea (1972)

Two Little Rich Girls (1972)

Murder in Waiting (1973)

Danger Money (1975)

Family Fortune (1976)

Nine O’Clock Tide (1978)

The Bayou Road (1979)

Casa Madrone (1980)

Family Affair (1981)

Next of Kin (1982)

The Patient in Cabin C (1983)

Alpine Condo Cross Fire (1984)

A Fighting Chance (1986)

SHORT STORIES

"Introducing Susan Dare" (April 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare)

"Spider (May 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare)

"Easter Devil (June 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare)

"The Claret Stick (July 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare)

"The Man Who Was Missing (August 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare)

"The Calico Dog (September 1934, The Delineator; Susan Dare; also as “The Calico Dog;” Susan Dare)

"Bermuda Grapevine" (October 1938, The American Magazine)

"Express to Danger" (February 1939, The American Magazine)

"Deadly Is the Diamond" (June 1942, The American Magazine)

"Murder Goes to Market (July 1943, The American Magazine)

"The Crimson Paw (October 1952, The American Magazine)

"The Wagstaff Pearls" (1952, This Week; James Wickwire)

"Murder in Waltz Time" (May 1953, The American Magazine)

"Dangerous Widows" (1953; James Wickwire)

The Valentine Murder" (1954; James Wickwire)

"Mr. Wickwire’s 'Gun Moll' " (1956)

"The Blonde from Sumatra" (date unknown; James Wickwire)

"The Gate at Number Ninety" (date unknown)

The House by the Sea" (date unknown)

"The Jade Cup" (date unknown)

Murder by Night" (date unknown; James Wickwire)

The Old Man’s Diamond" (date unknown; Sarah Keate)

COLLECTIONS

The Cases of Susan Dare (1934; Susan Dare)

Five of My Best (1949)

The Crimson Paw (1959)

Best Mystery Stories (1988)

Three Days for Emeralds (n.) Random 1988 [New York City, NY]

PLAYS

320 College Avenue (1938; written with Fred Ballard)

Eight O’Clock Tuesday (1941; written with Robert Wallsten)

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Biography

 

Mignon G. Eberhart was one of the most prolific authors of mysteries of the mid-20th century, with some 63 novels to her credit from 1929-1988, of which eight were made into movies, principally by Warner Bros. Born Mignon Good in Lincoln, NE, in 1899, she attended Nebraska Wesleyan University, graduating in 1920. Three years later, she married Alanson C. Eberhart, a civil engineer. His work required the couple to travel extensively, which left Mignon with lots of time and little to do. She turned to writing as something to occupy her time, initially as a freelance journalist, but during the late '20s, began to write novels. Her first mystery, The Patient in Room 18, was published in 1929; in it, she introduced the sleuthing couple of nurse Sarah Keate, a middle-aged health practitioner and amateur sleuth, and police detective Lance O'Leary, who figured in four more novels together. Eberhart's books were built on fairly complex mystery stories, with lots of detail and potential blind alleys to keep the reader guessing, and, in terms of character and structure, were offshoots of the old gothic romance school of fiction. Her Sarah Keate was a mature, matronly crime-solver, somewhat similar to Charles Stewart Palmer's Hildegard Withers character. 

Eberhart's books began getting adapted to the screen in 1935, when her second novel, While the Patient Slept, was picked up by Warner Bros.' B-movie unit and turned into a pleasant 67-minute entry in its "Clue Club" series starring middle-aged Aline MacMahon as crime-solving nurse Sarah Keate and more than middle-aged Guy Kibbee as police detective Lance O'Leary under director Ray Enright. The studio's second film from an Eberhart book, The White Cockatoo (1935), directed by Alan Crosland, was altered considerably from its source and provided a vehicle for Ricardo Cortez and Jean Muir. By the studio's third adaptation,Murder by an Aristocrat (1936), the character of Sarah Keate was back with an altered name and in a much younger form played by Marguerite Churchill. Eberhart's From the Dark Stairway was similarly altered for The Murder of Dr. Harrigan, with Kay Linaker playing the young nurse/sleuth. 20th Century Fox took over the Eberhart books in 1937 with The Great Hospital Mystery, in which hefty, matronly Jane Darwell played the nurse protagonist.Warner Bros.' British studio produced a genuinely obscure adaptation of From The Dark Stairway as The Dark Stairway in 1938, but, from a modern perspective, the most interesting of all the Eberhart-based films was The Patient in Room 18 (1938), directed by Crane Wilbur and Bobby Connelly. Patric Knowles plays a detective-story enthusiast who is hospitalized for his own good, only to stumble upon a real murder mystery; Ann Sheridan played nurse Sara Keate, in this movie, which strangely anticipated elements of Conspiracy Theory. Sheridan was back for one more film as Eberhart's nurse protagonist, Mystery House (1938), but Eberhart's work faded from the screen after that, with the exception of Republic Pictures' 1945 adaptation of Hasty Wedding as Three's a Crowd

Although Hollywood ignored her after 1945, Eberhart's work remained popular for another four decades. Her output slackened somewhat in the 1940s, possibly due to a tumultuous personal situation -- she divorced her first husband, married a man named John Hazen Perry, divorced him in 1948, and then remarried her first husband. She wrote 33 books over the ensuing 38 years, and was given a Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America in 1971, at age 72. She retired from writing at in 1988. She died in 1996 at age 97. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/mignon-g-eberhart-writer-mystery-crime#ixzz29K8iMU56

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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Post your comments, reviews and/or additional links here - thank you!

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maxcat
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Gosh, I thought I read a fair amount of Mignon's books but you have quite a list there, Becke. I will just have to hunt around for some of those other books. I was brought up on her books along with Agatha Christie. She did quite a number of scary mysteries from what I recall. Mary Roberts Rhinehart was another good mystery author in those days. Back then, mysteries were so basic and uncomplicated with a few twists and turns in them.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART


maxcat wrote:

Gosh, I thought I read a fair amount of Mignon's books but you have quite a list there, Becke. I will just have to hunt around for some of those other books. I was brought up on her books along with Agatha Christie. She did quite a number of scary mysteries from what I recall. Mary Roberts Rhinehart was another good mystery author in those days. Back then, mysteries were so basic and uncomplicated with a few twists and turns in them.


I was surprised how many of her books are still in print - and a lot of them are available for Nook. Many of the classic authors we've featured were long out of print, and some were even hard to find as used books.

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eadieburke
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

I have this one on order:

 

The Patient in Room 18  

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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Ryan_G
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

On my next trip to the used book store, I'm going to look for her books.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART


Ryan_G wrote:

On my next trip to the used book store, I'm going to look for her books.


B&N has quite a few of her books new, used and formatted for Nook.

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leisure_reader
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Becke

I feel like a novice in reading Mystery genre with all of the different authors you bring to the table.  Learn somethine/someone new every day

:smileysurprised:

J

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
- Eleanor Roosevelt

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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART


leisure_reader wrote:

Becke

I feel like a novice in reading Mystery genre with all of the different authors you bring to the table.  Learn somethine/someone new every day

:smileysurprised:

J


I've been reading mysteries since I was 8 years old, and I still can't keep up with all the mystery authors! It's fun for me to find out about new authors, too!

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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART


becke_davis wrote:

leisure_reader wrote:

Becke

I feel like a novice in reading Mystery genre with all of the different authors you bring to the table.  Learn somethine/someone new every day

:smileysurprised:

J


I've been reading mysteries since I was 8 years old, and I still can't keep up with all the mystery authors! It's fun for me to find out about new authors, too!


Or, in this case, old authors. I've been reading Mignon G. Eberhart for years but I didn't think of her for this feature until someone else suggested it. Thanks to all of you for sharing the books you're reading!

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Fricka
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

Well, I feel like a party-pooper, because I just finished reading El Rancho Rio, and I did not like it.

Feel kind of sheepish about admitting that, too, as I'm the one who suggested we add Mignon to our Mystery Classics list. Anyone have a suggestion about one of her other books you REALLY liked? I'm willing to give it another try, and hope I do like the next book of hers I read.

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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eadieburke
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

[ Edited ]

Fricka wrote:

Well, I feel like a party-pooper, because I just finished reading El Rancho Rio, and I did not like it.

Feel kind of sheepish about admitting that, too, as I'm the one who suggested we add Mignon to our Mystery Classics list. Anyone have a suggestion about one of her other books you REALLY liked? I'm willing to give it another try, and hope I do like the next book of hers I read.


Fricka:

 

I just finished:

 

The Patient in Room 18  

It wasn't bad for a first debut novel.

 

I also have:

While the Patient Slept  

 

I will read this too as the reviews on the back said the second novel is better than her first.

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART


eadieburke wrote:

Fricka wrote:

Well, I feel like a party-pooper, because I just finished reading El Rancho Rio, and I did not like it.

Feel kind of sheepish about admitting that, too, as I'm the one who suggested we add Mignon to our Mystery Classics list. Anyone have a suggestion about one of her other books you REALLY liked? I'm willing to give it another try, and hope I do like the next book of hers I read.


Fricka:

 

I just finished:

 

The Patient in Room 18  

It wasn't bad for a first debut novel.

 

I also have:

While the Patient Slept  

 

I will read this too as the reviews on the back said the second novel is better than her first.


I'm trying to remember which my favorites were. All the titles sound familiar!

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Ryan_G
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Re: American Mystery Classics #2- MIGNON G. EBERHART

I picked up two of her books at a used bookstore today, I've started on Wolf in Man's Clothing and am really liking it so far, though I haven't read much of it yet.  These aren't the covers I have.

 

Wolf in Man's Clothing  

Man Missing  

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com