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American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

This week we focus on another American Mystery Classic author, DASHIELL HAMMETT.

 


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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT (this video is a full hour episode)

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

http://www.donherron.com/?page_id=51

 

 

The Tour

“Since 1977, Don Herron has slipped on his trenchcoat and snap-brim hat to lead groups on a four-hour, three-mile investigation of Hammett sites…”

— NEW YORK TIMES —

“Theatrical and thoroughly immersed in Hammett arcana.”

— LOS ANGELES TIMES —

“Hammett and the San Francisco of the 1920s come to life again.”

— SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE —

“The group moved like a drunken cat through the streets and back alleys of the Tenderloin. It passed Southeast Asian diners, tawdry hotels, bars without windows, and places where a twenty will buy you more than the weekend’s groceries.”

— THE WALL STREET JOURNAL —

 

Travel with Don Herron over the fog-shrouded hills stalked by Sam Spade, the Continental Op, and other hardboiled characters created by San Francisco’s most renowned mystery and noir writer. During this walk you’ll see the buildings where Hammett wrote his most famous stories and the majority of locales from his classic novel, The Maltese Falcon.

Shadow Sam Spade in his quest for the fabulous figurine of a mysterious black bird.

 

Prowl the back alleys where the Continental Op, Hammett’s longest-running detective, faced down the opposition over the barrel of his blazing .38. Follow Hammett himself as he works for the Pinkerton Detective Agency on the infamous Fatty Arbuckle case. See the spot where Spade’s partner, Miles Archer, with a smile on his mug and his pistol buttoned away under his overcoat, met swift death in the night-fog.

 

2012 SCHEDULE: SUNDAYS in the month of May and in the month of September — Extra Walks, Book Signings, and other Hammett-related activities occasionally pop up, announced in the Blog or under Current Walks, as they occur.

 

No reservations taken. Just show up. Use your detective skills to spot the guy in the snap-brim hat and trenchcoat. The New York Times found him. You can, too.

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/dashiell-hammett/about-dashiell-hammett/625/

 

December 30th, 2003
Dashiell Hammett
About Dashiell Hammett

Dashiell Hammett was born on the eastern shore of Maryland in 1894. The second of three children, he dropped out of school at the age of thirteen. He worked a succession of low-paying jobs including freight clerk, railroad laborer, messenger boy, and stevedore. In 1915 he began working on and off as a detective for the Pinkerton Agency.

 

In less than ten years he would be turning these experiences into some of the most popular detective stories of his time. Unlike the intellectualized mysteries of earlier detective novels, Hammett’s less-than-glamorous realism transformed the genre into a serious response to the urban culture of the times.

 

Hammett spent his early twenties working as a detective in San Francisco before enlisting in the army during World War I. He became a sergeant in the Motor Ambulance Corp, where he contracted tuberculosis. Upon returning from the service, he realized that his ailing health made it impossible to continue as a detective. Quitting the agency, he tried his hand at writing. His first story was published in 1922 by the upscale society magazine THE SMART SET. His new gritty style of detective story, however, was better suited to the pulp crime magazines of the time. In 1923, one of the most popular, BLACK MASK, published his story “Arson Plus.”

 

For the next several years Hammett would hone his skills as a storyteller in the pages of BLACK MASK. There he introduced a nameless character referred to only as “the Continental Op.” This down-to-earth operative working for the Continental Detective Agency was the antithesis of the glamorous all-knowing investigators that made up much of the detective genre. The “Op,” with his rough speech and matter-of-fact attitude, was incredibly popular.

 

In 1928 he wrote a full-length novel with the “Op,” incorporating much of what he had seen at the Pinkerton Agency. RED HARVEST was a psychological thriller narrated in a voice both penetrating and off-the-cuff. It was the raw, unadorned style of Red Harvest that would come to be known as “hard boiled.” Within a year Hammett published his second book, THE DAIN CURSE. By 1930 he had built a strong following, and decided to branch out with a new character.

 

For his next novel, Hammett created Sam Spade, a rough and solitary man who worked outside of the law. This independent detective made his first appearance in what was to become Hammett’s most famous book, THE MALTESE FALCON (1930). A story of greed and betrayal, THE MALTESE FALCON went into seven printings in its first year. In the 1941 movie version Humphrey Bogart played a reluctant, yet idealistic detective who epitomized the “hard boiled” hero. He tackled society’s corruption with an unyielding search for the truth, and a lack of concern for what it took to find it.

 

Hammett followed THE MALTESE FALCON a year later with THE GLASS KEY, a story of political intrigue focused on the social relations of the rich and the corruption of power. The New York Times described it as combining “the tradition of Sherlock Holmes with the style of Ernest Hemingway.” His new-found fame brought him into contact with a number of writers, including Ernest Hemingway.

 

That same year he began a tempestuous affair with the playwright, Lillian Hellman. Hellman was strong, witty, intelligent and socially connected. Their affair introduced him to the thrilling new world of high society. To Hellman’s dismay, Hammett continued his life-long habits of excessive drinking and womanizing. Though their thirty year affair was often rocky, the two remained friends throughout Hammett’s life.

 

By the mid-thirties Hammett was at the height of his fame. No longer struggling to pay the rent, he moved to Hollywood and lived within the exclusive world of the Hollywood elite. In 1934 he published THE THIN MAN, which portrayed an ex-detective reluctantly investigating a disappearance. At the center of the story was a couple living a liquor-soaked open marriage. Scandalous for the times, THE THIN MAN, was repeatedly censored, but remained Hammett’s greatest commercial success. After THE THIN MAN, Hammett worked for the major studios re-writing other people’s scripts. Though he would continue to write for radio during the forties, THE THIN MAN was to be his final novel.

 

For the remainder of his life, Hammett dedicated himself to left-wing political involvement and the defense of civil liberties. During World War II, at the age of forty-eight, Hammett enlisted as a private in the army. Three years later he was honorably discharged as a sergeant.

 

Leaving the army, he began to teach writing in New York at a Marxist institute. It was then that Hammett’s political integrity would be challenged. As the president of New York Civil Rights Congress, Hammett had posted bail for a group of communists on trial for conspiracy. When they jumped bail, Hammett was jailed for refusing to give the names of the sources of the bail money. After serving five months in prison, he was let out, only to find that the IRS was charging him with one hundred thousand dollars in back taxes.

 

Hammett spent the last ten years of his life in a small rural cottage in Katonah, New York. No longer at the center of the literary world, he continued to drink heavily in isolation. In 1955 he suffered a heart attack, and died six years later in New York City. Though his output was limited to only five novels, Hammett remains one of the most influential writers of his time. His introduction of the “hard-boiled” genre has had a profound effect on both television and the movies, and his uncompromisingly vernacular prose has influenced generations of writers as diverse as Raymond Chandler and William Burroughs.

 
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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashiell_Hammett

 

His death:


A lifetime's heavy consumption of alcohol and cigarettes worsened Hammett's tuberculosis contracted in World War I, and then according to Hellman (Lillian Hellman) "jail had made a thin man thinner, a sick man sicker . . . I knew he would now always be sick."[21] He may have meant to start a new literary life with the novel Tulip, but left it unfinished perhaps because he was "just too ill to care, too worn out to listen to plans or read contracts. The fact of breathing, just breathing, took up all the days and nights."[22]

As the years of the 1950s wore on, Hellman says Hammett became "a hermit," his decline evident in the clutter of his rented "ugly little country cottage" where "[t]he signs of sickness were all around: now the phonograph was unplayed, the typewriter untouched, the beloved foolish gadgets unopened in their packages."[23] Hammett no longer could live alone and they both knew it, so the last four years of his life he spent with Hellman. "Not all of that time was easy, and some of it very bad, " she says but, "guessing death was not too far away, I would try for something to have afterwards." [24] January 10, 1961, Hammett died in New York City's Lenox Hill Hospital, of lung cancer, diagnosed just two months before. As a veteran of two World Wars, he was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

[ Edited ]

More from Wikipedia - sorry, I'm posting these backwards: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashiell_Hammett

 

Post-war political activity

 

After the war, Hammett returned to political activism, "but he played that role with less fervor than before."[13] He was elected President of theCivil Rights Congress (CRC) on June 5, 1946 at a meeting held at the Hotel Diplomat in New York City, and "devoted the largest portion of his working time to CRC activities."[13] In 1946, a bail fund was created by the CRC "to be used at the discretion of three trustees to gain the release of defendants arrested for political reasons."[14] Those three trustees were Hammett, who was chairman, Robert W. Dunn, andFrederick Vanderbilt Field, "millionaire Communist supporter."[14] On April 3, 1947, the CRC was designated a Communist front group on theAttorney General's List of Subversive Organizations, as directed by U.S. President Harry S. Truman’s Executive Order 9835.[15]

 

Imprisonment and the blacklist

 

The CRC's bail fund gained national attention on November 4, 1949, when bail in the amount of "$260,000 in negotiable government bonds" was posted "to free eleven men appealing their convictions under the Smith Act for criminal conspiracy to teach and advocate the overthrow of the United States government by force and violence."[14] On July 2, 1951, their appeals exhausted, four of the convicted men fled rather than surrender themselves to Federal agents and begin serving their sentences. The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York issued subpoenas to the trustees of the CRC bail fund in an attempt to learn the whereabouts of the fugitives.[14] Hammett testified on July 9, 1951 in front of United States District Court Judge Sylvester Ryan, facing questioning by Irving Saypol, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, described by Time as "the nation's number one legal hunter of top Communists".[14] During the hearing Hammett refused to provide the information the government wanted, specifically, the list of contributors to the bail fund, "people who might be sympathetic enough to harbor the fugitives."[14] Instead, on every question regarding the CRC or the bail fund, Hammett took the Fifth Amendment, refusing to even identify his signature or initials on CRC documents the government had subpoenaed. As soon as his testimony concluded, Hammett was found guilty of contempt of court.[14][16][17][18] Hammett served time in a West Virginia federal penitentiary where, according to Lillian Hellman,[19] he was assigned to cleaning toilets.[20]

During the 1950s he was investigated by Congress as part of Senator Joseph McCarthy's attempt to identify Communist influence on American society and politics. He testified on March 26, 1953 before the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations about his own activities, but refused to cooperate with the committee and was blacklisted.

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashiell_Hammett

 

Samuel Dashiell Hammett (play /dəˈʃl/; May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories, screenplay writer, and political activist. Among the enduring characters he created are Sam Spade (The Maltese Falcon), Nick and Nora Charles (The Thin Man), and the Continental Op (Red Harvest and The Dain Curse).

 

In addition to the significant influence his novels and stories had on film, Hammett "is now widely regarded as one of the finest mystery writers of all time"[1] and was called, in his obituary in The New York Times, "the dean of the... 'hard-boiled' school of detective fiction".[2] Time magazine included Hammett's 1929 novel Red Harvest on a list of the 100 best English-language novels published between 1923 and 2005.[3]

 

Early life

 

Hammett was born on a farm called Hopewell and Aim in St. Mary's County, in southern Maryland.[4] His parents were Richard Thomas Hammett and Anne Bond Dashiell. His mother belonged to an old Maryland family whose name was Anglicized from the French De Chiel. Hammett was baptized a Catholic[5] and grew up in Philadelphia and Baltimore. "Sam," as he was known before he began writing, left school when he was 13 years old and held several jobs before working for the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. He served as an operative for the Pinkertons from 1915 to February 1922, with time off to serve in World War I. However, the agency's role in union strike-breaking eventually disillusioned him.[6]

Hammett enlisted in the United States Army in 1918 and served in the Motor Ambulance Corps. However, he became ill with the Spanish fluand later contracted tuberculosis. He spent most of his time in the Army as a patient in Cushman Hospital, Tacoma, Washington. While there he met a nurse, Josephine Dolan, whom he later married.

 

Marriage and family

 

Hammett and Dolan were married, and they had two daughters, Mary Jane (born 15 October 1921) and Josephine (born in 1926).[7] Shortly after the birth of their second child, Health Services nurses informed Josephine that due to Hammett's TB, she and the children should not live with him full time. Josephine rented a home in San Francisco, where Hammett would visit on weekends. The marriage soon fell apart, but he continued to support his wife and daughters financially with the income he made from his writing.[8]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashiell_Hammett

 

Career

 

Hammett turned to alcohol before working in advertising and, eventually, writing. His work at the detective agency provided him the inspiration for his writings.[9] Hammett wrote most of his detective fiction during the period that he was living in San Francisco (the 1920's), and specific streets and locations in San Francisco are frequently mentioned in his stories.

Known for his authenticity and realism, Hammett drew on his experiences as a Pinkerton operative. As Hammett said: "All my characters were based on people I've known personally, or known about."[10]

 

Raymond Chandler, the writer often considered Hammett's successor, summarized his accomplishments:

"Hammett was the ace performer... He is said to have lacked heart; yet the story he himself thought the most of [The Glass Key] is the record of a man's devotion to a friend. He was spare, frugal, hard-boiled, but he did over and over again what only the best writers can ever do at all. He wrote scenes that seemed never to have been written before."

- Chandler, The Simple Art of Murder

 

Later years

 

From 1929 to 1930 Dashiell was romantically involved with Nell Martin, an author of short stories and several novels. He dedicated The Glass Key to her, and in turn, she dedicated her novel Lovers Should Marry to Hammett.

 

In 1931, Hammett embarked on a 30-year affair with playwright Lillian Hellman. This relationship was portrayed in the film Julia, in which Hammett was portrayed by Jason Robards and Hellman by Jane Fonda, in Oscar winning and nominated performances respectively.

 

He wrote his final novel in 1934, and devoted much of the rest of his life to left-wing activism. He was a strong anti-fascist throughout the 1930s and in 1937 he joined the American Communist Party.[11] As a member (and in 1941 president) of the League of American Writers, he served on its Keep America Out of War Committee in January 1940 during the period of the Hitler-Stalin pact.[12] The League again abruptly shifted its political position, ending its anti-war stance, with the German invasion of the USSR in the summer of 1941.

 

Service in World War II

In early 1942, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hammett again enlisted in the United States Army. He was a disabled veteran of World War I, and a victim of tuberculosis, but he pulled strings in order to be admitted. He served as a sergeant in the Aleutian Islands, where he edited an Army newspaper. He also fell victim to emphysema. As a corporal in 1943, he had co-authored The Battle of the Aleutians with Cpl. Robert Colodny, under the direction of an Infantry intelligence officer, Major Henry W. Hall.

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/hammett.html

 


Dashiell Hammett
Also wrote as Peter Collinson, Daghull Hammett, Samuel Dashiell, Mary Jane Hammett
(1894-1961)

"Hammett gave murder back to the kind of people
that commit it for reasons."

--Raymond Chandler

Dashiell Hammett was born in St. Mary's County, Maryland, on May 27th, 1894, and died January 10, 1961, in New York, New York. In between, he was one of the seminal creators in detective fiction. As if creating Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon wasn't enough, he was also responsible for The Continental Op and The Thin Man, the novel that introduced husband and wife sleuths Nick and Nora Charles to the world, and became the basis for a string of popular movies. His name appeared in the credits to Brad Runyon, The Fat Man, and other radio shows featuring his characters, and alongside Alex Raymond's, for the private eye/spy daily comic strip Secret Agent X-9.

He grew up on the streets of Philadelphia and Baltimore. He became a detective in 1915 when he joined the Baltimore branch of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, housed in the Continental Building. You see, Hammett not only talked the talk, but he also walked the walk. He actually was a private detective. He learned the detective racket from James Wright, a short, squat, tough-talking operative, whom Hammett came to idolize (and who would later supposedly serve as the inspiration for The Continental Op). And detecting was no easy racket. Years later, playwright Lillian Hellman, Hammett's friend and lover, wrote of "the bad cuts on his legs and the indentations in his head from being scrappy with criminals."

Hammett left the Pinkertons in 1918, and enlisted in the Army, but tuberculosis contracted while in service prompted his medical discharge less than a year later. In fact, Hammett suffered from poor health, including bouts of tuberculosis and alcoholism, for the rest of his life. He eventually rejoined the Pinks, and worked out of their San Francisco office. In fact, somewhere out there is an account of some of the more peculiar cases Hammett was involved in while he was a Pinkerton Op, including his confession that he knew a man who once stole a ferris wheel. However, the piece doesn't mention the murder of labour organizer Frank Little in the mining town of Butte, Montana, where Hammett was employed as a strike breaker, during a particularly brutal mining strike. The rumour is that the Pinkerton men may have played a part in Little's murder, and that it was this incident that hastened Hammett's departure from Pinkerton's, and possibly helped crystalize his left-leaning views (which later got him into so much trouble with McCarthy and his pals in the 1950's).

By 1922 , Hammett was a fledgling professional writer in San Francisco, publishing his first short story, "The Parthian Shot," in the October 1922 issue of The Smart Set, and shortly after, "The Road Home" in the December 1922 issue of a relatively new pulp mag, Black Mask. His third Black Mask-published story, "Arson Plus," in the October 1, 1923 issue, introduced his ground-breaking character, The Continental Op -- the nameless operative of the Continental Detective Agency (possibly based on James Wright).

Hammett may not have been the first to write about a hardboiled private eye, but, as our pal Jim Doherty notes:

Carroll John Daly was undoubtedly first to publish a short story featuring a hard-boiled sleuth who defines his profession as a private detective ("Three-Gun Terry" in the May 15, 1923 issue of Black Mask), beating the first Op story, "Arson Plus" into print by a few months... But there's no reason to suppose that Hammett would never have created the Op had not Daly created Mack . In fact, it's possible the two stories were being written simultaneously. Daly, being a less careful writer, may have simply beat Hammett to the mailbox.

On the other hand, there's plenty of reason to suppose that Chandler wouldn't have created Marlowe, Macdonald wouldn't have created Archer, Nebel wouldn't have created Donahue, etc., etc., etc., had Hammett not first created the Op.

In other words, while Daly was undeniably first, Hammett was far more influential.

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http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/hammett.html

 

 

Encouraged by Black Mask's new editor, Captain Joseph Shaw, Hammett became one of the true stars of that pivotal pulp. Hammett's Continental Op eventually appeared in over three dozen stories, some of which formed the basis for the novels Red Harvest and The Dain Curse, were both published in 1929.

Hammett's best-known, and arguably best novel, however, was The Maltese Falcon, featuring Sam Spade in 1930). Of course, a big part of the novel's popularity can be traced to the classic film that was adapted from it in 1941, directed by John Huston, and starring Humphrey Bogart as Spade. The Glass Key (featuring the gangster Ned Beaumont, 1931), and The Thin Man (with Nick and Nora Charles, 1934) were also best sellers; and both went on to become successful films; in fact, a whole string of films, in The Thin Man's case.

But by 1934, he had published The Thin Man, Hammett's career as a published writer was essentially over. He had met Lillian Hellman, a script reader with ambitions to be a playwright the previous autumn, and they would soon embark on a long, tumultous and often tawdry relationship, full of high drama and cocktails, politics and art. Alas, very little of the art was Hammett's.

He never wrote another novel, and he wrote few short stories. Always looking for money, he took a whack at scripting a comic strip, Secret Agent X-9, but his involement with that enterprise only lasted a year. He wrote a few things for radio, or at least lent his name to them. Thanks to the success of the film versions of his work, his reputation preceded him in Hollywood, and he wrote a handful of screen stories. He also became quite involved in Hellman's work, acting as a sounding board and editor, at least, and -- it's been suggested by many -- a co-writer.

In 1942, swept with patriotic fever, Hammett enlisted in the American Army (he was forty-eight at the time!). Lillian and he had always been active in leftist politics, lending their names to various causes, but with the end of WWII, the political pendulum had definitely swung the other way. In 1951, Hammett was called to testify in the trial of four communists accused of conspiring against the U.S. government. He declined, and went to prison for five months, despite his failing health. He was fifty-seven at the time. Hellman herself was eventually hauled before HUAC, and ordered to testify and to name names. Likewise defiant, she let loose with a powerful speech condemning the entire process, and the senators backed down.

Dashiell Hammett died on January 10, 1961.

He may never never written anything of true significance after 1934 (or at least, nothing close to the magnificense of his earlier work), but the myth of the private eye turned writer lives on. In the seventies, Joe Gores, another San Francisco private eye turned writer, wrote Hammett, a fictitious account of Hammett chucking the writing gig and going after a friend's killer. It was as much a loving tribute as it was a fictionalized biography, and was probably as true as fiction can get. It was eventually also made into a pretty good film.

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/hammett.html

 

Raymond Chandler described Hammet's writing style in The Simple Art of Murder:

"Hammett wrote... for people with a sharp, aggressive attitude to life. They were not afraid of the seamy side of things; they lived there. Violence did not dismay them; it was right down their street. Hammett gave murder back to the kind of people that commit it for reasons, not just to provide a corpse ... He put these people down on paper as they were, and he made them talk and think in the language they customarily used for these purposes. "

Or, as Ross Macdonald put it, in a a MWA Anthology in 1952,

"We all came out from under Hammett's black mask."

Or, a perhaps the last word should go to Hammett himself who once confessed to his daughter Josephine:

"I've been as bad an influence on American literature as anyone I can think of."

UNDER OATH

  • "Hammett gave murder back to the kind of people that commit it for reasons."
    (Raymond Chandler, from 
    The Simple Art of Murder)
    .
  • "When I was 14 or 15 I read Hammett's The Thin Man (the first Hammett I'd read) and it was a defining moment. It was a sad, lonely, lost book, that pretended to be cheerful and aware and full of good fellowship, and I hadn't known you could do that: seem to be telling this, but really telling that; three-dimensional writing, like three-dimensional chess. Nabokov was the other master of that."
    (Donald Westlake)
    .
  • "If not the greatest, Dashiell Hammett is certainly the most important American mystery writer of the twentieth century, and second in history only to Edgar Allen Poe, who essentially invented the genre."
    (Tony Hillerman)
    .
  • "As a novelist of realistic intrigue, Hammett was unsurpassed in his own or any time... We all came out from under Hammett's black mask.""
    (Ross Macdonald) ?

  • “Take your Chandler friend by the hand, put a piece of tape over his mouth, and tell him to just shut up and hear how it ought to be done. Hammett’s style does not date, as does Chandler’s, and The Glass Key puts to shame every other hard-boiled writer.”
    (Dilys Winn in 
    Murder Ink)
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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

NOVELS

............

COLLECTIONS

  • A Man Called Spade and Other Stories (1944, Sam Spade)
  • The Continental Op (1945; The Continental Op)
  • The Return of the Continental Op (1945; The Continental Op)
  • Hammett Homicides (1946; The Continental Op and others)
  • Dead Yellow Women (1947; The Continental Op and others)
  • Nightmare Town (1948; The Continental Op and others)
  • The Creeping Siamese (1950; The Continental Op and others)
  • Woman in the Dark (1952; collects original novella and other stories)
  • A Man Called Thin (1962).
  • The Big Knockover (1966; The Continental Op and others, edited and with an intro by Lillian Hellman)...Buy this book
  • The Continental Op (1974; The Continental Op and others; edited and with an intro by Steven Marcus)...Buy this book
  • Nightmare Town (1999; The Continental OpSam SpadeNick and Nora Charles,Alexander Rush and others; edited by Kirby McCauley, Martin H. Greenberg and Ed Gorman)...Buy this book
  • Vintage Hammett (2005)... Buy this book
    This sampler includes selections from his novels and a short story, "Nightshade," which has not been available for over fifty years. The collection was released to mark the 75th anniversary of the publication of Hammett's The Maltese Falcon..
  • Lost Stories (2005; edited by Vince Emery and with an intro by Joe Gores)., Buy this book
    Long-awaited collection of 21 long-lost stories, many appearing for the first time in book form. Not Hammett's best or even most important work, but anyone interested in Hammett or detective fiction could do far worse than this impressive book, with an intro by Joe Gores and fascinating and copious notes from editor Vince Emery. Illustrated.

***There's WAAAAAAAAY more at this link:

 

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/hammett.html

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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT

Great intro to Hammett; thanks, becke.

 

Of course, people are generally more familiar with The Maltese Falcon, his most famous work, and of course the film version with Humphrey Bogart, but The Thin Man is also a great mystery, and the film version of that wasn't too bad, either. I did see a first-rate television dramatic version of The Dain Curse, which is what set me off to read as many of Hammett's other books as I could find at the library.

It would be cool if some producer now would take a look at those Continental Op stories..

Oh, that tour in San Francisco sounds really interesting too, becke! That might be just the ticket for a cool summer get-away, one of these days.

 

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics: DASHIELL HAMMETT


Fricka wrote:

Great intro to Hammett; thanks, becke.

 

Of course, people are generally more familiar with The Maltese Falcon, his most famous work, and of course the film version with Humphrey Bogart, but The Thin Man is also a great mystery, and the film version of that wasn't too bad, either. I did see a first-rate television dramatic version of The Dain Curse, which is what set me off to read as many of Hammett's other books as I could find at the library.

It would be cool if some producer now would take a look at those Continental Op stories..

Oh, that tour in San Francisco sounds really interesting too, becke! That might be just the ticket for a cool summer get-away, one of these days.

 


I thought that tour sounded really cool, too!