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American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

This month we're featuring two authors who were both hugely famous in the 1960s, when I was a teenager. ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER wrote books that still endure, particularly his 87th Precinct mysteries. I'm not sure if I've read all of his books, but I've read all the 87th Precinct ones. I highly recommend them!

 

Here's Ed McBain's website, which is still active: http://www.edmcbain.com/

 

 

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

 

 

EVAN HUNTER / ED McBAIN

 

He was born in New York City. Married Anita Melnick, 1949 (divorced), 3 children (Ted, Mark, Richard); married Mary Vann Finley, 1973 (divorced), 1 stepdaughter (Amanda); married Dragica Dimitrijevic, 1997.

 

During World War II he served in the US Navy, and then took a university degree, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. A few months of teaching in high school were followed by a job in a literary agency in New York. He describes himself at this time as "fiercely ambitious", doing a full day’s work in the agency and spending all his nights and weekends writing. His first success, published under the name Evan Hunter, was THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE (1954) — a tough novel of New York life, about an idealistic teacher in a slum high school. It was later made into a film with Glenn Ford and Sidney Poitier.

 

Since then he has written more than eighty novels, writing under several names, but most famously as Evan Hunter and Ed McBain. He has also written many screenplays, including the one for Hitchcock’s film THE BIRDS. As Ed McBain, he is the author of the 87th Precinct novels, the longest, the most varied, and possibly the most popular crime series in the world. These novels are about a team of policemen, usually including Detective Steve Carella, and are set in an "imaginary city". There are fifty-two 87th Precinct novels to date. The two most recent titles are THE LAST DANCE and MONEY, MONEY, MONEY.

AWARDS:
Mystery Writers of America Award, 1957, for short story THE LAST SPIN. Grand Master Award, Mystery Writers of America, 1986, for lifetime achievement. First American to receive the British Crime writer’s Association Cartier Diamond Dagger, 1998. Frankfurt Origial e-Book Award, best fiction, 2002.

 

HIS AUDIENCE: 
Books by Evan Hunter/Ed McBain have been best-sellers in Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, The Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Italy, Israel, Japan, Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

BOOKS:

 

By Ed McBain

 

The 87th Precinct Novels
Cop Hater 
The Mugger
The Pusher (1956) 
The Con Man 
Killer’s Choice (1957) 
Killer’s Payoff
Killer’s Wedge 
Lady Killer (1958)
‘Til Death
King’s Ransom (1959)
Give the Boys a Great Big Hand
The Heckler 
See Them Die (1960) 
Lady, Lady, I Did It! (1961) 
The Empty Hours
Like Love (1962) 
Ten Plus One (1963) 
Ax (1964) 
He Who Hesitates  Doll (1965)
Eighty Million Eyes (1966) 
Fuzz (1968) 
Shotgun (1969) 
Jigsaw (1970) 
Hail, Hail, the Gang’s All Here (1971) 
Sadie When She Died
Let’s Hear It for the Deaf Man (1972) 
Hail to the Chief (1973) 
Bread (1974) 
Blood Relatives (1975) 
So Long As You Both Shall Live (1976)
Long Time No See (1977) 
Calypso (1979) 
Ghosts (1980) 
Heat (1981)
Ice (1983) 
Lightning (1984)
Eight Black Horses (1985) 
Poison  Tricks (1987)
Lullaby (1989) 
Vespers (1990) 
Widows (1991) 
Kiss (1992) 
Mischief (1993) 
And All Through the House (1994) 
Romance (1995) 
Nocturne (1997) 
The Big Bad City (1999) 
The Last Dance (2000) 
Money, Money, Money (2001) 
Fat Ollie's Book (2002)
The Frumious Bandersnatch (2004)
Hark (2004)
Fiddlers (2005)

The Matthew Hope Novels
Goldilocks (1978)
Rumpelstiltskin (1981) 
Beauty and the Beast (1982) 
Jack and the Beanstalk (1984) 
Snow White and Rose Red (1985)
Cinderella (1986) Puss in Boots (1987) 
The House that Jack Built (1988)
Three Blind Mice (1990) 
Mary, Mary (1993) 
There Was a Little Girl (1994) 
Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (1966) 
The Last Best Hope (1998)

Women in Jeopardy 2005 
Alice in Jeopardy 2005

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

Other Novels
The Sentries (1965) 
Where There’s Smoke  Doors (1975)
Guns (1976) 
Another Part of the City (1986) 
Downtown (1991) 
Driving Lessons (2000) 
Transgressions (2005)
The Gutter and the Grave (2005)

 

Novels Originally Published under the Pseudonym Richard Marsten
Runaway Black (1954) 
Death of a Nurse (1955) 
Vanishing Ladies (1957) 
Big Man (1959)
Even the Wicked (1958)

 

By Evan Hunter

 

Novels
The Blackboard Jungle (1954) 
Second Ending (1956) 
Strangers When We Meet (1958) 
A Matter of Conviction (1959) 
Mothers and Daughters (1961) 
Buddwing (1964) 
The Paper Dragon (1966)
A Horse’s Head (1967)
Last Summer (1968) 
Sons (1969) 
Nobody Knew They Were There (1971)
Every Little Crook and Nanny (1972) 
Come Winter (1973) 
Streets of Gold (1974) 
The Chisholms (1976) 
Love, Dad (1981) 
Far From the Sea (1983) 
Lizzie (1985) 
Criminal Conversation (1994) 
Privileged Conversation (1996) 
Candyland (2001)
The Moment She Was Gone (2002)

 

Memoir
Me and Hitch (1997)
Let’s talk (2005)

 

Short Story Collections
Happy New Year, Herbie (1963) 
The Easter Man (1972) 
Running from Legs 
Barking at Butterflies (2000)
Learning to kill (2005)

 

Children’s Books
Find the Feathered Serpent (1952) 
The Remarkable Harry (1959) 
The Wonderful Button (1961) 
Me and Mr. Stenner (1976)

 

Screenplays
Strangers When We Meet (1959) 
The Birds (1962) 
Fuzz (1972) 
Walk Proud (1979)

 

Teleplays
The Chisholms (1979) 
The Legend of Walks Far Woman (1980) 
Dream West (1986)

Plays
The Easter Man (1964)
Curtain (1969)

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

[ Edited ]

Evan Hunter aka Ed McBain

 

DESCRIPTION

Date of Birth:

October 15th :
birthdate of great men

Hair:

Silvery Brown

Place of Birth:

New York, NY

Eyes:

Blue

Height:

6'

Complexion:

Clear

Weight:

180 pounds

Sex:

Occasionally

Build:

Average

 

 

Nationality:

American

Occupations:

Best selling novelist, Screenwriter

Remarks:

Wrote hundreds of books corrupting millions of people.

Scars and Marks:

Too numerous to mention (mostly from critics)

 

 

 

 

Evan Hunter's writing career has spanned five decades, from his first novel, THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE, in 1954 to the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's THE BIRDS to CANDYLAND, written in tandem with his alter ego, Ed McBain, to his most recent novel, THE MOMENT SHE WAS GONE. He is the first American ever to receive the Diamond Dagger, the British Crime Writers Association's highest award. He also holds the Mystery Writers of America's prestigious Grand Master Award. His most recent 87th Precinct novel was MONEY, MONEY, MONEY. Evan Hunter / Ed McBain has lived in Weston, Connecticut with his wife Dragica for the last ten years.

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

Evan Hunter, Writer Who Created Police Procedural, Dies at 78

Published: July 7, 2005
Evan Hunter, the author who as Ed McBain virtually invented the American police procedural with his gritty 87th Precinct series featuring an entire detective squad as its hero, died yesterday at his home in Weston, Conn. He was 78.

The cause was cancer of the larynx, said his agent, Jane Gelfman.

In a 50-year career, Mr. Hunter, sometimes as Ed McBain and sometimes using other names, wrote a vast number of best-selling novels, short stories, plays and film scripts. With the publication of "Cop Hater" in 1956, the first of the 87th Precinct novels, he took police fiction into a new, more realistic realm, a radical break from a form long dependent on the educated, aristocratic detective who works alone and takes his time puzzling out a case.

Set in a New York-like metropolis named Isola, "Cop Hater" laid down the formula that would define the urban police novel to this day, including the big, bad city as a character in the drama; multiple story lines; swift, cinematic exposition; brutal action scenes and searing images of ghetto violence; methodical teamwork; authentic forensic procedures; and tough, cynical yet sympathetic police officers speaking dialogue so real that it could have been soaked up in a Queens diner between squad shifts.

Lending humanity to the grim stories that flood the 87th Precinct is a revolving ensemble cast that includes Detective Steve Carella, the heart and conscience of the squad room; his gentle, deaf wife, Teddy; the rocklike Detective Meyer Meyer, whose father refused to give him a first name because he didn't want to name him for "some goy"; Bert Kling, the rookie cop who plays Candide to his hard-bitten elders; and Fat Ollie Weeks, the equal-opportunity bigot.

For all the studied muscularity of his style as Ed McBain, Mr. Hunter considered himself an emotional writer rather than a hard-boiled one. "I think of myself as a softy," he once said. "I think the 87th Precinct novels are very sentimental, and the cops are idealistic guys." He was also a stern moralist, and in many of his novels, this aspect surfaced as a keening lament for the battered soul of his city.

"This was a city in decline," he wrote in "Kiss" (1992). "The cabby knew it because he drove all over this city and saw every part of it. Saw the strewn garbage and the torn mattresses and the plastic debris littering the grassy slopes of every highway, saw the bomb-crater potholes on distant streets, saw the black eyeless windows in the abandoned tenements, saw public phone booths without phones, saw public parks without benches, their slats torn up and carried away to burn, heard the homeless ranting or pleading or crying for mercy, heard the ambulance sirens and the police sirens day and night but never when you needed one, heard it all, and saw it all, and knew it all, and just rode on by."

The hard, blunt prose could not disguise a sophisticated stylist who hated to be pigeonholed as a genre writer. "Not procedurals," a character in "Romance" (1995) protests when someone slaps that label on books he writes. "Never procedurals. And not mysteries, either. They were simply novels about cops. The men and women in blue and in mufti, their wives, girlfriends, boyfriends, lovers, children, their head colds, stomachaches, menstrual cycles. Novels."

Although other practitioners adopted the conventions that continue to distinguish the realistic police procedural from the hard-boiled American private-eye novel and the genteel British detective mystery, many critics considered Mr. Hunter's command of the form to be matchless, an assessment with which he no doubt would have concurred.

"I feel that there is no other writer of police procedurals in the world from whom I can learn anything," he told John C. Carr, editor of "The Craft of Crime," "and in fact they all learn a lot from me." There wasn't any point in his reading the competition, he said. "That's like Michelangelo watching an apprentice paint in the white of an eye."

His peers shared that assessment. The Mystery Writers of America awarded Ed McBain its Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement in 1986, and in 1998 he was the first American to receive a Cartier Diamond Dagger from the Crime Writers Association of Great Britain. Though his popularity with readers never flagged, by the early 1990's his 87th Precinct novels were particularly in vogue. And while earlier books in the series, like "Eighty Million Eyes" (1966), "Sadie When She Died" (1972) and "Fuzz" (1968), continue to be admired as vintage McBain, later, more complex works like "Widows" (1991), "Mischief" (1993) and "Money, Money, Money" (2001) racked up more robust sales in the United States and abroad. Ms. Gelfman, his agent, estimated that in 50 years of writing, he had sold more than 100 million copies of his work.

Despite his popularity, Mr. Hunter could give the impression of a literary talent who felt he had not been given his due, mainly because of the limited success of film and television adaptations of his books. Although several of his 87th Precinct novels were turned into films, and a number of the novels were adapted for television in Japan, it rankled that an American television series, "87th Precinct," was a failure in the 1960's.

Instead, the show that revolutionized prime-time crime drama was "Hill Street Blues" in the 1980's. Mr. Hunter had nothing to do with that series, but he ruefully held to the conviction that it had drawn its concept, characters and dramatic style from the McBain novels.

Despite his renown as Ed McBain, it was as Evan Hunter that the author had his first taste of literary acclaim, before he was 30. That was in 1954 for "The Blackboard Jungle," a somewhat autobiographical novel about a young teacher whose ideals are shattered when he is assigned to an urban vocational high school with a half-savage student body. The next year it was turned into a successful movie with Glenn Ford and Sidney Poitier. Mr. Hunter followed "The Blackboard Jungle" with other best-selling novels, including "Mothers and Daughters" (1961) and "Last Summer" (1968).

He also adapted some of his novels for the movies, including "Fuzz," a 1972 film starring Burt Reynolds, and "Strangers When We Meet" (1960), starring Kirk Douglas and Kim Novak. But the most acclaimed of his 75 or so screenplays was the one for "The Birds," the classic 1963 film that he and Alfred Hitchcock adapted from a story by Daphne du Maurier.

Until illness sidelined him, Mr. Hunter had been collaborating with the composer Charles Strouse and the lyricist Susan Birkenhead on a musical stage version of the 1968 film comedy "The Night They Raided Minsky's," about burlesque theater in New York.

For many years, the Evan Hunter and Ed McBain bylines were strictly separated to avoid any confusion or shock that readers of Evan Hunter's "serious" books might feel when exposed to the "mayhem, bloodshed and violence" that were Ed McBain's meat and drink. The author later acknowledged a fusion of the literary styles he once considered distinct. "Evan Hunter and Ed McBain are truly becoming one," he said in 1992, and in 2001 the two wrote the novel "Candyland."

Neither name was his original one. He was born Salvatore Lombino on Oct. 15, 1926, in New York City, the only child of a postal employee, Charles Lombino, and his wife, the former Marie Coppola. He started writing while serving in the Navy during World War II. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hunter College and held a teaching job that he would later draw on for "The Blackboard Jungle."

Though his Italian immigrant ancestry would inspire him to write a generational saga, "Streets of Gold" (1974), he changed his name in 1952, believing that "prejudice against writers with foreign names" led publishers to reject their work. "If you're an Italian-American, you're not supposed to be a literate person," he said in 1981.

Mr. Hunter's first two marriages, to Anita Melnick and Mary Vann Hughes, ended in divorce. He is survived by his wife, Dragica; a son with Ms. Melnick, Ted, of San Miguel, Mexico; two sons with Ms. Hughes, Mark, of Paris, and Richard, of Monroe, Conn.; a stepdaughter, Amanda Finley of New York; and two grandchildren.

Mr. Hunter's first divorce, in 1973, led to the appearance of a new character, Matthew Hope, a Florida divorce lawyer. Hope became an Ed McBain hero in a separate series of novels, all bearing fairy-tale titles like "Goldilocks," the first, in 1978. After a dozen books, he quietly retired the series in 1998.

After a heart attack in the 1980's, Mr. Hunter modified his routine of writing 10 hours a day just about every day of the week. One result was fewer, darker, more thoughtful books and a new philosophy: "When it's no longer fun, I'll stop."

But he kept going. His current publisher, Otto Penzler/Harcourt, will bring out "Fiddlers," the 55th and last in the 87th Precinct series, in September, and "Learning to Kill," a collection of five decades of stories, next spring.

 

Correction: July 8, 2005, Friday:

Because of an editing error, an obituary of the novelist Evan Hunter yesterday misidentified the mother of two of his three sons. His first wife, Anita Melnick (not his second, Mary Vann Hughes) is the mother of Mark Hunter and Richard Hunter, as well as Ted Hunter.



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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

FromWikipedia:

 

Evan Hunter (October 15, 1926 – July 6, 2005) was an American author and screenwriter. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956.

 

Early life

Hunter was born and raised as Salvatore Lombino in New York City, living in East Harlem until the age of 12, at which point his family moved to theBronx. He attended Olinville Junior High School, then Evander Childs High School, before winning an Art Students League scholarship. Later, he was admitted as an art student at Cooper Union. Lombino served in the Navy in World War II, writing several short stories while serving aboard a destroyerin the Pacific. However, none of these stories were published until after he had established himself as an author in the 1950s.

After the war, Lombino returned to New York and attended Hunter College, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, majoring in English and Psychology, with minors in dramatics and education. He published a weekly column in the Hunter College newspaper as "S.A. Lombino". In 1981, Hunter was inducted into the Hunter College Hall of Fame where he was honored for outstanding professional achievement.[1]

While looking to start a career as a writer, Lombino took a variety of jobs, including 17 days as a teacher at Bronx Vocational High School in September 1950. This experience would later form the basis for his 1954 novel The Blackboard Jungle.

 

In 1951, Lombino took a job as an Executive Editor for the Scott Meredith Literary Agency, working with authors such as Arthur C. ClarkeP.G. WodehouseLester del ReyPoul Anderson, and Richard S. Prather, among others. He made his first professional short-story sale that same year, ascience-fiction tale entitled "Welcome Martians", credited to S.A. Lombino.


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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

More from Wikipedia:

 

Name change and pen names


Soon after his initial sale, Lombino sold stories under the pen names "Evan Hunter" and "Hunt Collins". The name "Evan Hunter" is generally believed to have been derived from two schools he attended, Evander Childs High School and Hunter College, although the author himself would never confirm that. (He did confirm that the name "Hunt Collins" was derived from Hunter College.) Lombino legally changed his name to Evan Hunter in May 1952, after an editor told him that a novel he wrote would sell more copies if credited to "Evan Hunter" than it would if it were credited to "S.A. Lombino". Thereafter, he used the name Evan Hunter both personally and professionally.

As Evan Hunter, he gained notice with his 1954 novel The Blackboard Jungle. Dealing with juvenile crime and the New York City public school system, the film version followed in 1955. During this era, Hunter also wrote a great deal of genre fiction. He was advised by his agents that publishing too much fiction under the Hunter byline, or publishing any crime fiction as Evan Hunter, might weaken his literary reputation. As a consequence, during the 1950s Hunter used the pseudonyms Curt Cannon, Hunt Collins, and Richard Marsten for much of his crime fiction. A prolific author in several genres, Hunter also published approximately two dozen science fiction stories and four SF novels between 1951 and 1956 under the names S.A. Lombino, Evan Hunter, Richard Marsten, D.A. Addams and Ted Taine.

Ed McBain, his best known pseudonym, began to used in 1956, with Cop Hater, the first novel in the 87th Precinct crime series. NBC ran a police drama also called 87th Precinct during the 1961–1962 season based on McBain's work. Hunter revealed that he was McBain in 1958, but continued to use the pseudonym for decades, notably for the 87th Precinct series, and the Matthew Hope detective series. He retired the pen names of Cannon, Marsten, Collins, Addams and Taine around 1960. From then on crime novels were generally attributed to McBain, and other sorts of fiction to Hunter. Reprints of crime-oriented stories and novels written in the 1950s previously attributed to other pseudonyms were re-issued under the McBain byline. Hunter stated that the division of names allowed readers to know what to expect: McBain novels had a consistent writing style, while Hunter novels were more varied.

Under the Hunter name, novels steadily appeared throughout the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s, including Come Winter (1973), and Lizzie (1984). Hunter was also successful as screenwriter for film and television. He wrote the screenplay of the Hitchcock film The Birds (1963) loosely adapted from a Daphne du Maurier short story. In the process of adapting Winston Graham's novelMarnie for Hitchcock, Hunter and the director disagreed on the rape scene, and the writer was sacked. Hunter's other screenplays included Strangers When We Meet (1960), based on his own 1958 novel; and Fuzz (1972), based on the 1968 "87th Precinct" novel of the same name, which he had written as Ed McBain.

From 1958 until his death, McBain's "87th Precinct" novels appeared at a rate of approximately one or two novels a year. From 1978 to 1998, they were joined by another McBain series about lawyer Matthew Hope; books in this series appeared every year or two. For about a decade, from 1984 to 1994, Hunter published no fiction under his own name.

In 2000, a novel called Candyland appeared that was credited to both Hunter and McBain. The two-part novel opened in Hunter's psychologically-based narrative voice before switching to McBain's customary police procedural style. Aside from McBain, Hunter used at least two other pseudonyms for his fiction after 1960; Doors (1975) was originally attributed to Ezra Hannon, before being reissued as a work by McBain, and the Scimitar (1992) was credited to John Abbott.

As well, Hunter has long been rumoured to have written an unknown number of pornographic novels for William Hamling's publishing houses as Dean Hudson. Though Hunter consistently denied writing any books as Hudson right up to his death, apparently his agent Scott Meredith sold books to Harding's company as Hunter's work, receiving payments for these books in cash. However, Hunter -- if he did, in fact, write the novels -- never dealt with the publisher directly, and no records were kept by Meredith or Hamling of these cash transactions (presumably to avoid paying taxes). As well, Meredith may have forwarded novels to Hamling by any number of authors, claiming these novels were by Hunter simply in order to make a sale. Because of all these factors, it is impossible to do more than speculate as to which specific Hudson books may be Hunter's work.[2] A total of 93 novels were published under the Hudson name between 1961 and 1969, and even the most avid proponents of the Hunter-as-Hudson theory do not believe Hunter is responsible for all 93.

In addition to his many books, Hunter also gave advice to other authors in his article, "Dig in and get it done: no-nonsense advice from a prolific author (aka Ed McBain) on starting and finishing your novel". In it he advises authors to “find their voice for it is the most important thing in any novel.”

 

Private life

 

He had three sons. Richard Hunter, is a harmonica virtuoso while Mark Hunter, [1] is a professor at INSEAD and the Institut français de Presse, and an award-winning investigative reporter and author. His eldest son, Ted, a painter, died in 2006.

Evan Hunter died from laryngeal cancer in 2005 at the age of 78 in Weston, Connecticut.

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

Several Ed McBain and Evan Hunter books were made into movies and TV shows. Some are listed here: http://www.edmcbain.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=66

 

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

I began using pseudonyms early in my career, when I was being paid a quarter a cent a word for my work, and when I had to write a lot to earn a living. Sometimes I had three or four stories in a single magazine without the editor knowing they were all by me.
Evan Hunter

 

I try to keep all my novels in print. Sometimes publishers don't agree with me as to their worth.
Evan Hunter

 

I would like to win the Pulitzer Prize. I would like to win the Nobel Prize. I would like to win a Tony award for the Broadway musical I'm now working on. Aside from these, my aspirations are modest ones.
Evan Hunter

 

It's a matter of style. The Evan Hunter style and the Ed McBain style are very, very different.
Evan Hunter

 

Read more at:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/e/evan_hunter.html#zeWkBKXJcRuyXgiV.99

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

I've barely scratched the surface here - there is a lot of information, lots of videos, etc. and historical information about this author on the web. Feel free to add to what I've posted!

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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

[ Edited ]

The Moment She Was Gone  

 

I read this over the weekend - Here's some info about the book:

 

The Gulliver Family is having a hard time dealing with Annie who is mentally ill. Annie is constantly taking off without notice to different places around the world. She returns unexpectedly, only to disappear again and again. This novel is about how a family needs to confront family secrets in order to keep Annie from harming herself or someone else.

 

The book is hard to put down and Hunter's writing ability allows the words to just flow off the page very fluently. It is a journey of revelation and self discovery and makes you very sympathic toward Annie and her problems.

 

I am now looking forward to reading more Evan Hunter/Ed McBain novels.

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

I loved the 87th Precinct TV series. I used to watch it all the time. I found a book by Ed McBain called Nocturne. I'm halfway through it and it's a page turner. My neighbor, before she moved out gave me some books and I acquired Mary, Mary, which I haven't read but since it is not an 87th Precinct novel, it will be interesting to see what happens in that book.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER


maxcat wrote:

I loved the 87th Precinct TV series. I used to watch it all the time. I found a book by Ed McBain called Nocturne. I'm halfway through it and it's a page turner. My neighbor, before she moved out gave me some books and I acquired Mary, Mary, which I haven't read but since it is not an 87th Precinct novel, it will be interesting to see what happens in that book.


I've read a few of the Matthew Hope books, but I was totally addicted to the 87th Precinct books for YEARS. Here are the Matthew Hope books: 

http://www.goodreads.com/series/51409-matthew-hope

 

I love the characters in the 87th Precinct books, especially Steve and Teddy Carella.

 

Here's what Wikipedia has about this series:

 

The 87th Precinct is a series of police procedural novels and stories written by Ed McBain. McBain's 87th Precinct works have been adapted, sometimes loosely, into movies and television on several occasions.

 

Setting


The series is based on the work of the police detectives of the 87th Precinct in Isola, a district of a large fictional city based on the New York City borough of Manhattan. Other districts in McBain's fictionalized version of New York correspond to NYC's other four boroughs, Calm's Point standing in for Brooklyn, Majesta representing Queens, Riverhead substituting for the Bronx, and Bethtown for Staten Island.

 

Relation to Dragnet

 

Each novel begins with the same disclaimer:

"The city in these pages is imaginary. The people, the places are all fictitious. Only the police routine is based on established investigatory technique."

 

In interviews and articles, McBain has freely admitted that his series was heavily influenced by the radio and TV series Dragnet. This introduction, simultaneously evoking and contradictingDragnet's introductory phrase, "The story you are about to see is true. The names have been changed to protect the innocent," was apparently McBain's way of acknowledging the debt, yet announcing his intention to go his own way in every book.


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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

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Characters

 

The series focuses on the detectives of the 87th Precinct, and although different detectives will "star" in different novels, most 87th novels feature a significant, if not a starring role for Detective 2nd Grade Stephen Louis "Steve" Carella. Carella's fellow precinct detectives include Arthur Brown, Eileen Burke, Roger Havilland, Cotton Hawes, Bert Kling, Meyer Meyer, Andy Parker, Bob O'Brien, Hal Willis, Alex Delgado, and Richard Genero. (During investigations Carella is most often partnered with Meyer, Hawes, or Kling.) In the first novel in the series, Carella is partnered with a detective called Bush. Bush's wife has hired someone to murder Bush, as well as two other officers who are not mentioned in the other novels.

 

The detective squad commander is Lt. Peter Byrnes. Also seen frequently, and lending a certain continuity to the series, are the minor characters Alf Miscolo (the clerk in charge of records and coffee) and desk sergeant Dave Murchison, as well as a large cast of regulars who do not work at the 87th, including Steve's deaf-mute wife Theodora "Teddy" Carella; the buffoonish and arrogant homicide detectives Monoghan and Monroe, who always appear together; the crime lab supervisor Sam Grossman; Medical Examiner Paul Blaney (and later his twin brother Carl) from the Coroner's Office; police informants Danny Gimp and Fats Donner; Rolly Chabrier and Nellie Brand from the District Attorney's office; and Detective Ollie Weeks (a.k.a. "Fat Ollie"), a central character in several 87th Precinct novels even though he is in fact on the squad of the neighboring 88th Precinct.

 

Another recurring character was the Deaf Man, a Professor Moriarty-like criminal mastermind who appeared in six novels, enjoyed plotting elaborate crimes to bedevil the men of the 87th, but by miscalculations on his part, and the blind luck of the detectives, was foiled.

 

Hunter's final book Learning To Kill, was published in July 2006 under his Ed McBain pseudonym. It is a volume of short stories written between 1952 and 1957, including some that inspired and became 87th Precinct mysteries.

 

Ed McBain on writing an 87th Precinct novel


"I usually start with a corpse. I then ask myself how the corpse got to be that way and I try to find out-just as the cops would. I plot, loosely, usually a chapter or two ahead, going back to make sure that everything fits - all the clues are in the right places, all the bodies are accounted for...(I) believe strongly in the long arm of coincidence because I know cops well, I know how much it contributes to the solving of real police cases."

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ReadingPatti
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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER

Becke, I have never read any of Ed or Evan's books. I will have to check them out.

 

ReadingPatti

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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics Double Feature: ED MCBAIN aka EVAN HUNTER


ReadingPatti wrote:

Becke, I have never read any of Ed or Evan's books. I will have to check them out.

 

ReadingPatti


I think they are just as good today as when they came out!