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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/jdm.html

 


John D. MacDonald


(Pseudonyms included John Wade Farrel, Robert Henry, John Lane, Scott O'Hara, Peter Reed, Henry Reiser; 1916-1986)

Best known as the creator of Travis McGee, John Dann MacDonald was one of the last of the old pulpsters to cross over successfully to the burgeoning paperback market of the fifties.

But he was more, much more than that. He continued to regularly appear on the bestseller lists well into the eighties in fact. In his long career, he produced over seventy books, mostly in the hardboiled/crime vein, although he did produce some decent work in science fiction, romance and other genres. He even produced some notable non-fiction, particularly No Deadly Drug, a true crime book, and The House Guests, a cat's eye view of the world.

He was born in Pennsylvania, and received his MBA at Harvard, but moved to Florida after World War II. While stationed in the Far East, to amuse himself he wrote a short story, and sent it to his wife. His wife loved it, and supposedly without MacDonald's permission, submitted it to the prestigious slick, Story, where it was accepted. Inspired by this success, MacDonald decided to become a writer, and upon his return Stateside, he wrote hundreds of stories, mostly for the pulps. He continued to pump them out, until, as he put it, "the last of them were shot out from under me."

Fortunately, just as the pulps were dying out, MacDonald was able to catch the rising wave of the paperback boom. From 1950 until he released his first Travis Mcgee novel, he published over forty PBO's, all stand-alones. His crime novels of this period are masters of the form -- spare, tight, often dark and even nasty tales of desperate men in way over their heads; taut morbid fables with psychological underpinnings and a burgeoning environmental awareness, often set in his adopted state of Florida. It was these books that served him well when he finally unleashed his series character, the colourful and larger-than-life Travis McGee. What could have been merely a string of cheesy paperbacks about a mouth-breathing pseudo-Robin Hood beach bum instead became, in many ways, a chronicle of America's own growing awareness of social issues. And, oh yeah, simply as pure adventure, they kicked ass.

MacDonald served as president of The Mystery Writers of America, and was elected a Grand Masterin 1972. He also received the Benjamin Franklin Award for Short Story in 1955, the French Grand Prix de Litterature Policiere in 1964 and the American Book Award in 1980, and was the only mystery writer to ever win the National Book Award, for The Green Ripper.

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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/jdm.html

 

UNDER OATH

  • "(He was) the great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller."
    -- Stephen King
    .
  • "Most readers loved MacDonald's work because he told a rip-roaring yarn. I loved it because he was the first modern writer to nail Florida dead-center, to capture all its languid sleaze, racy sense of promise, and breath-grabbing beauty...For me and many natives (of Florida), some of McGee's finest moments were when he paused, mid-adventure, to inveigh against the runaway exploitation of this rare and dying paradise. If a cypress swamp got plowed to make way for another shopping mall, he took it personally: "This was instant Florida, tacky and stifling and full of ugly and spurious energies." Every McGee saga guarantees such splendidly mordant commentary. The customary targets are greedhead developers, crooked politicians, chamber-of-commerce flacks, and the cold-hearted scammers who flock like buzzards to the Sunshine State. For John D. MacDonald, these were not just useful fictional villains; they were villains of real life. When he passed away unexpectedly in 1986, millions of fans worldwide wondered what would become of Travis McGee. Not me. I wondered what would become of Florida without him...."
    -- Carl Hiaasen, from an intro to The Deep Blue Goodbye

SHORT STORIES

  • Yeah, I know...I'll get to it....Suffice it to say that in his lifetime, MacDonald sold over six hundred stories in his liftime, to all sorts of magazines, in all kinds of stories. He was published in crime pulps such as Detective TalesDime DetectiveDime MysteryDoc SavageJustice,Mammoth MysteryThe Shadow Magazine and even Black Mask, and in slicks such asCollier'sEsquireLibertyPlayboyThis Week and Cosmopolitain. he wrote sports stories, science fiction, adventures, romances, westerns and mysteries. Often more than one of his stories would appear in the same magazine, often under some pseudonym. The July 1949 issue of of Fifteen Sports Stories, for example, has four stories by MacDonald in it. No wonder he resorted to pseudonyms.
    .
  • "Conversation on Deck" (January 1946, The American Courier)
  • "The Game" (February 1946, The American Courier)
  • "Cash on the Coffin" (May 1946, Detective Tales)
  • "A Handful of Death" (June 1946, Doc Savage; as Peter Reed)
  • "Blame Those Who Die" (June 25, 1946, Short Stories)
  • "Bury the Pieces!" (July 1946, Dime Mystery)
  • "The Flying Elephants" (July 10, 1946, Short Stories)
  • "Interlude in India" (July-August 1946, Story)
  • "The Dry Mouth of Danger" (August 1946, Doc Savage)
  • "The Dead Dream" (September 1946, The Shadow)
  • "Justice in the Sun" (October 1946, Doc Savage)
  • "Female of the Species" (October 1946, Dime Detective)
  • "Get Dressed for Death" (October 1946, Mammoth Mystery)
  • "he Little People" (November 1946, Doc Savage)
  • "The Scarred Hand" (November 1946, Doc Savage; aka "I Accuse Myself"; as John Farrell)
  • "The Startled Face of Death" (November 1946, Doc Savage, November 1946; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "The Whispering Knives" (November 1946, The Shadow)
  • "Coward in the Game" (November 25,1946, Short Stories)
  • "Private War" (December 1946, Doc Savage)
  • "You Got to Have a Good Lip" (December 1946, Esquire)
  • "Redheads Won't Wait" (December 1946, The Shadow, December 1946; as Peter Reed)
  • "I Ain't So Dumb" (December 1946, The Shadow, December 1946; as Robert Henry)
  • "A Bat in the Hall" (December 1946, The Shadow)
  • "Muddy Gun" (January 1947, Best Stories)
  • "The Hands of an Artist" (January 1947, The Shadow)
  • "The Fixed Smile of Death" (January 1947, The Shadow; as Robert Henry)
  • "The Bright Flash of Vengeance" (January 1947, The Shadow; as Peter Reed)
  • "Eight Dozen Agents." (January 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "Hole in None" (January 4,1947, Liberty)
  • "Dead to the World" (February 1947, Dime Detective; aka "No Business for an Amateur")
  • "Bonded in Death" (February 1947, Doc Savage; as Harry Rieser)
  • "The Deadly Game of Darts" (February 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "The Anonymous Letter" (February-March 1947, The Shadow)
  • "Backlash" (February-March 1947, The Shadow; as Peter Reed)
  • "Nor Iron Bars" (March-April 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "You've Got to Be Cold" (April-May 1947, The Shadow; aka "The Night Is Over")
  • "The Notched Ears" (May 1947, Best Stories)
  • "The Pay-Off" (May 1947, Cosmopolitan)
  • "Suicidal Journey" (June 1947, Dime Detective)
  • "Crooked Circle" (1947, Fight Stories)
  • "The Pendans Box" (July 1947, Bluebook)
  • "They Let Me Live" (July-August 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "To Cut the Cards" (July-August 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "North on the Parkway" (August 1947, Esquire)
  • "Never Marry Murder" (August-September 1947, The Shadow)
  • "Manhattan Horse Opera" (September 1947, Black Mask; aka "Heads I Win, Tails You Lose")
  • "Design for Dying" (September 1947, Dime Detective)
  • "The Chinese Pit" (September-October 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "he Gentle Killer" (September 1947)
  • "Oh, Give Me a Hearse!" (October 1947, Dime Detective; aka "A Place to Live")
  • "Begin Again" (November 1947, Liberty, November 1947)
  • "My Mission is Murder" (November 1947, Dime Detective; aka "Death For Sale")
  • "Or the World Will Die" (November-December 1947, Doc Savage)
  • "Second Visitor" (November-December 1947, Doc Savage; as Peter Reed)
  • "Worse Than Murder" (November-December 1947, Doc Savage; as Henry Rieser)
  • "That Old Grey Train" (November 1947, Super Sports)
  • "What About Alice?" (December 1947, The Sign)
  • "Big John Fights Again" (December 1947, Super Sports)
  • "Punch Your Way Home" (December 1947, Sports Fiction)
  • "Even Up the Odds" (January 1948, Detective Story Magazine)
  • "Come Die with Me!" (January 1948, New Detective)
  • "Even Up the Odds" (January 1948, Detective Story Magazine)
  • "Cosmetics" (February 1948, Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "The Pastel Production Line" (February 1948, Bluebook)
  • "Pickup" (February 1948, Cosmopolitan)
  • "The High Walls of Hate" (February 1948, Dime Detective; aka "The High Gray Walls of Hate")
  • "With Soul So Dead" (March 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "One Vote for Murder" (March 1948, New Detective)
  • "Her Black Wings" (March 1948, Shock)
  • "High Dive to Oblivion" (April 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "The Corpse Rides at Dawn" (April 1948, Ten-Story Western)
  • "The Spiralled Myth" (April 1948, Spectator Club)
  • "The Mechanical Answer" (May 1948, Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Death Sleeps Here!" (May 1948, New Detective)
  • "Blood of the Vixen" (May 1948, Shock)
  • "Satan's Angel" (May 1948, Shock; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "The Cold Trail of Death" (May-June 1948, Doc Savage)
  • "The Tin Suitcase" (May-June 1948, Doc Savage; aka "She Cannot Die"; as by Peter Reed)
  • "Homicidal Hiccup" (June 1948, Detective Tales)
  • "Call Your Murder Signals!" (June 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "Venomous Lady" (July 1948, Shock)
  • "Sepulchre of the Living"(July 1948, Shock)
  • "So Sorry" (July 1948, Sports Fiction)
  • "Cavaliers Make Good Corpses" (August 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "Loser Take All" (August 1948, Sports Novels)
  • "Fatal Accident" (Fall 1948, The Shadow)
  • "The Case of the Carved Model" (September 1948, Black Mask)
  • "Nicky and the Tin Finger" (September 1948, Bluebook)
  • "Red-Headed Bait" (September 1948, Detective Tales)
  • "Scene of the Crime" (September 1948, Detective Tales)
  • "Just a Kill in the Dark" (September 1948, New Detective)
  • "Trial by Fury" (September 1948, New Detective; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Tune in on Station Homicide" (September 1948, New Detective; aka "A Time For Dying"; as Peter Reed)
  •  
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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

Continued:

 

  • "Dance of a New World" (September 1948, Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Runaway Cleats" (September 1948, Sports Novels)
  • "Thunder King" (September 1948, Sports Novels; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Shenadun" (September 1948, Startling Stories)
  • "Deep Death" (October 1948, Doc Savage)
  • "My Husband Dies Slowly" (October 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "They Never Quit" (October 1948, Sports Fiction)
  • "Death Is the Answer" (October 1948, Thrilling Detective)
  • "That Mess Last Year" (October 1948, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "School for the Stars" (October 1948, Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Blonde Bait for the Murder Master" (November 1948, Crack Detective Stories)
  • "Glory Blaster" (November 1948, Sports Novels)
  • "Ring Around the Redhead" (November 1948, Startling Stories)
  • "No Grave Has My Love" (December 1948, Dime Detective)
  • "Buzz-Saw Belter" (December 1948, New Sports)
  • "A Child Is Crying" (December 1948, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "Successful Season" (1948)
  • "When You Got a Pigeon" (December 1948-January 1949, The Shadow)
  • "Murder in Mind" (Winter 1949, Mystery Book)
  • "Hot-Seat on the Aisle" (January 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "Damsels of the Deep" (January 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Take the Bum Out!" (January 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Three's a Shroud" (January 1949, New Detective; aka "Verdict")
  • "Flaw" (January 1949, Startling Stories)
  • "The Great Stone Death" (January 1949, Weird Tales)
  • "Blackmail Breeds Bullets" (February 1949, All-Story Detective)
  • "Killer's Nest" (February 1949, Detective Tales; aka "Neighbourly Interest")
  • "A Coffin a Day" (February 1949, FBI Detective)
  • "Fight, Scrub, Fight!" (February 1949, New Sports)
  • "A Corpse in His Dreams" (February 1949, Mystery Book Magazine)
  • "Killing All Men" (March 1949, Black Mask; aka "Deadly Damsel")
  • "A Corpse in His Dreams" (Spring 1949, Mystery Book Magazine)
  • "Kiss the Corpse Goodbye" (March 1949, Black Mask; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "I'll Drown You in My Dreams" (March 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Danger -- Death Ahead!" (March 1949, New Detective)
  • "Last Chance Cleats" (March 1949, Sports Novels)
  • "A Corpse in His Dreams") (Spring 1949, Mystery Book)
  • "The Widow Wouldn't Weep" (April 1949, All-Story Detective)
  • "His Own Funeral" (April 1949, Detective Tales; as John Lane)
  • "The Corpse Belongs to Daddy" (April 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Loot for the Unlucky Lady" (April 1949, FBI Detective)
  • "Death Quotient" (April 1949, Super Science Stories)
  • "All Our Yesterdays" (April 1949, Super Science Stories; as John Wade Farrell)
  • "Delusion Drive" (April 1949, Super Science Stories) (as Peter Reed)

 

  • "You'll Never Escape" (May 1949, Dime Detective; aka "State Police Report That...")
  • "Murder in One Syllable" (May 1949, Black Mask)
  • "You'll Never Escape" (May 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Get Out of Town" (May 1949, New Detective)
  • "Immortality" (May 1949, Startling Stories)
  • "Somebody Has to Do the Job" (May 14, 1949, Toronto Star Weekly)
  • "But Not to Dream" (May 1949, Weird Tales)
  • "You Remember Jeanie" (May 1949, Crack Detective Stories)
  • "Three Strikes -- You're Dead!" (June 1949, All-Story Detective)
  • "Too Many Sinners" (June 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Make Mine Murder!" (June 1949, FBI Detective)
  • "Like a Keepsake" (June 1949, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "A Corpse-Maker Goes Courting" (July 1949, Dime Detective; aka "Unmarried Widow")
  • "Heritage of Hate" (July 1949, Black Mask; aka "Secret Stain" and "Triple Cross")
  • "Death Is a Lap Ahead" (July 1949, Adventure)
  • "Tank-Town Matador" (July 1949, Argosy)
  • "Swing-Time Sucker" (July 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "The Glory Punch" (July 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Bye, Bye, Backfield" (July 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories; as John Wade Farrell)
  • "The Thunder Road" (July 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories; as Peter Reed)
  • "Blue Water Fury" (July 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "The Cold, Cold Ground" (July 1949, New Detective)
  • "The Hunted" (July 1949, Super Science Stories)
  • "Bedside Murder" (Summer 1949, Mystery Book)
  • "Trojan Horse Laugh" (August 1949, Astounding Science Fiction)
  • "Looie Follows Me" (August 27, 1949, Collier's)
  • "What Makes Sammy Laugh?" (August 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "Amphiskios" (August 1949, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "Poor Little Rich Corpse" (September 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "Murder Run-Around" (September 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Mad About Murder" (September 1949, Dime Detective; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Six Points to Remember" (September 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Dead -- As in Darling" (September 1949, New Detective, September 1949)
  • "A Condition of Beauty" (September 1949)
  • "Minion of Chaos" (September 1949, Super Science Stories)
  • "The Miniature" (September 1949, Super Science Stories; as Peter Reed)
  • "Blue Stars for a Dead Lady" (October 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "Target for Tonight" (October 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Last Rendezvous" (October 1949, Dime Mystery)
  • "Warrant for an Old Flame" (October 1949, FBI Detective)
  • "A Young Man of Promise" (November 1949, Argosy)
  • "The Durable Corpse" (November 1949, Dime Detective)
  • "Run the Man Down" (November 1949, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Hang the Man High!" (November 1949, Fifteen Western Tales)
  • "Half Past Mayhem" (November 1949, New Detective)
  • "Appointment for Tomorrow" (November 1949, Super Science Stories)
  • "The Sleepers" (November 1949, Super Science Stories; as John Wade Farrell)
  • "Love, Inc." (November 1949, Today's Woman)
  • "Case of the Burning Blonde" (December 1949, Detective Tales)
  • "Take a Powder, Galahad!" (December 1949, Dime Detective, December 1949)
  • "Nine Coffins for Rocking H" (December 1949, Dime Western, December 1949)
  • "Murder in Mind' (Winter 1949, Mystery Book Magazine)
  • "Blue Water Fury" (1949; aka "The Big Blue")
  • "Looie Follows Me" (1949)
  • "Moonlit Sport" (January 1950, The American Magazine)
  • "Swing and Slay" (January 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "Stand Up and Slug!" (January 1950, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Stop, Look -- and Die!" (January 1950, New Detective)
  • "The First One" (January 1950, Startling Stories)
  • "Spin, Devil!" (January 1950, Super Science Stories; as John Wade Farrell)
  • "Spectator Sport" (February 1950, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "The Filly from Philly" (February 25,1950, Toronto Star Weekly)
  • "Man-Stalk" (March 1950, Argosy)
  • "The Judas Chick" (March 1950, Detective Tales)
  • "A Corpse on Me!" (March 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "Fall Guy" (March 1950, New Detective)
  • "A Trap for the Careless" (March 1950, Detective Tales)
  • "The Ultimate One" (March 1950, Super Science Stories)
  • "The Sitting Duck" (April 1950, Detective Tales)
  • "Blood on the Midway" (April 1950, Dime Detective; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Pigskin Patsy" (April 1950, Fifteen-Story Detective)
  • "The Plunder Five" (April 1950, New Sports)
  • "Journey for Seven" (April 1950, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "Portrait of a Murderess" (Spring 1950, Detective Book Magazine)
  • "Breathe No More, My Lovely" (May 1950, Detective Tales; aka "Breathe No More")
  • "This One Will Kill You" (May 1950, New Detective; aka "Death Writes the Answer")
  • "Night Watch" (May 1950, Detective Tales; aka "Check Out At Dawn"; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "The Long, Red Night" (May 1950, Detective Tales; as John Lane)
  • "Yes, Sir, That's My Slay-Babe!" (May 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "Vanguard of the Lost" (May 1950, Fantastic Adventures)
  • "Money Green" (May 1950, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "This One Will Kill You" (May 1950, New Detective)
  • "Wine of the Dreamers" (May 1950, Startling Stories)
  • "By the Stars Forgot" (May 1950, Super Science Stories)
  • "Gift of Darkness" (May 1950, Super Science Stories; as Peter Reed)
  • "College-Cut Kill" (June1950, Dime Detective; 2001, Pulp Masters)
  • "Sir Lancelot's Crime Wave" (June1950, Dime Detective; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Dead on the Pin" (Summer 1950, Mystery Book Magazine)
  • "Jukebox Jungle" (July 1950, Black Mask)
  • "Run, Sister, Run!" (July 1950, Detective Tales)
  • "Dead Men Don't Scare" (July 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "Five-Star Fugitive" (July 1950, Dime Detective; as Scott O'Hara)
  • "Half-Past Eternity" (July 1950, Super Science Stories)
  • "Escape to Fear" (July 1950, Super Science Stories; as Peter Reed)
  • "Make One False Move" (August 1950, Argosy)
  • "His Fatal Fling" (August 1950, Dime Detective)

 

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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

Continued...

 

  • "The Lady Is a Corpse!" (September 1950, Detective Tales; aka "From Some Hidden Grave")
  • "Exit Smiling" (September 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "The Homesick Buick" (September 1950, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine)
  • "Too Early to Tell" (October 1950, Adventure)
  • "Miranda" (October 1950, Fifteen Mystery Stories)
  • "Shadow on the Sand" (October 1950, Thrilling Wonder Stories)
  • "The Paw of the Cat" (November 1950, Detective Tales)
  • "Tri-Kill Cutie" (November 1950, Dime Detective)
  • "For Murder -- or Worse" (November 1950, New Detective)
  • "Final Mission" (November 1950, Planet Stories)
  • "The Big Contest" (December 1950, Worlds Beyond)
  • "Jukebox Jungle" (December 1950, Black Mask)
  • "I Love You (Occasionally)" (December 31,1950, This Week)
  • "Hand From the Void" (January 1951, Super Science Stories)
  • "Death for the Asking" (January 1951, Detective Fiction)
  • "Susceptibility" (January 1951, Galaxy Science Fiction)
  • "Hand from the Void" (January 1951, Super Science Stories)
  • "Destiny Deferred" (January 1951, Super Science Stories; as John Wade Farrell)
  • "Over My Dead Body!" (February 1951, Detective Tales)
  • "The Curse of the `Star'" (February 1951, Short Stories)
  • "Get Thee Behind Me" (March 1951, Detective Fiction)
  • "Case of Nerves" (March 1951, Detective Tales)
  • "The Deadliest Game" (April 1951, Detective Tales)
  • "Death Is My Comrade" (April 1951, New Detective)
  • "Salute to Courage" (April 1951, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "Violence Inherited" (May 1951, Detective Fiction)
  • "Nothing Must Change" (June 1951, Redbook)
  • "Escape to Chaos" (June 1951, Super Science Stories)
  • "Cosmic Knot" (June 1951, Super Science Stories; as Peter Reed)
  • "Path of Glory" (July 1951, Adventure)
  • "Lay Me Down and Die" (July 1951, Detective Fiction)
  • "Common Denominator" (July 1951, Galaxy Science Fiction)
  • "Crime of Omission" (August 1951, Detective Tales)
  • "Death Runs in the Family" (August 1951, Dime Detective)
  • "Dateline -- Death" (August 1951, New Detective)
  • "Who Stopped That Clock?" (August 12,1951, This Week)
  • "The White Fruit of Banaldar" (September 1951, Startling Stories)
  • "Big League Busher" (October 1951, Sport Magazine)
  • "Case of the Gorgeous Gams" (October 1951, Detective Tales)
  • "The Cloob from Glasgow" (October 1951, Fifteen Sports Stories)
  • "The Cardboard Star" (December 1951, The American Legion Magazine)
  • "The Girl Who Wanted Money" (December 1951, Dime Detective)
  • "The Man Who Died" (December 1951, Toronto Star Weekly)
  • "Betrayed" (March1952, The American Magazine; also July 1964, MSMM)
  • "All That Blood Money Can Buy" (April 1952, Detective Tales; aka "Murder For Money")
  • "Noose For aTigress" (August 1952, Dime Detective)
  • "The Man From Limbo" (1952, Dime Detective)
  • "The Innocent Victims" (1953, Bluebook; also 1999, Pure Pulp)
  • "The Trouble With Erica" (1953)
  • "I Always Get the Cuties" (1954)
  • "The Killer" (January 1955, Manhunt)
  • "Scared Money" (October 1955, Justice)
  • "Long Shot" (1955)
  • "The Bear Trap" (1955)
  • "Hangover" (1956)
  • "Romantic Courtesy" (1957)
  • "Man In a Trap" (1958, EQMM)
  • "Taint of the Tiger" (March 1958, Cosmopolitan)
  • "Black Cat in the Snow" (1958, Manhunt)
  • "The Fast Loose Money" (1958)
  • "The Trap of Solid Gold" (1960, Ladies Home Journal)
  • "End of the Tiger" (1963, This Week)
  • "The Legend of Joe Lee" (1964, Cosmopolitain)
  • "The Straw Witch" (1964, This Week)
  • "Blurred View" (1964, This Week)
  • "The Loveliest Girl in the World" (1964, This Week)
  • "Funnyman" (1966, The Saturday Evening Post; aka "Afternoon of the Hero")
  • "Quarrel" (1967, Playboy)
  • "Double Hannenframmis" (1970, Playboy)
  • "Hit and Run" (1973, A Treasury of Modern Mysteries)
  • "Finding Anne Farley" (1978, Best Detective Stories of the Year)
  • "Homicidal Hiccup" (1979, Alfred Hitchcock P:resents: The Master's Choice)
  • "Squealer!" (Manhunt)
  • "There Hangs Death!"
  • "The Random Noise of Love"
  • "Dear Old Friend" (Playboy)
  • "The Willow Pool"
  • "Woodchuck"
  • "The Annex" (Playboy)
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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

[ Edited ]

Continued:

 

COLLECTIONS

  • End of the Tiger and Other Stories (1966)
  • S*E*V*E*N (1971)
  • Other Times, Other Worlds (1978)
  • The Good Old Stuff (1982)
  • More Good Old Stuff (1984)

NOVELS

  • The Brass Cupcake (1950)
  • Murder For the Bride (1951)
  • Judge Me Not (1951)
  • Weep For Me (1951)
  • Wine of the Dreamers (1951)
  • The Damned (1952)
  • Ballroom of the Skies (1952)
  • The Neon Jungle (1953)
  • Dead Low Tide (1953)
  • Cancel All Our Vows (1953)
  • All These Condemned (1954)
  • Area of Suspicion (1954)
  • Contrary Pleasure (1954)
  • A Bullet For Cinderella (1955; aka On the Make)
  • Cry Hard, Cry Fast (1955)
  • You Live Once (1954)
  • April Evil (1955)
  • Border Town Girl (1956)
  • Murder In The Wind (1956)
  • Death Trap (1957)
  • Hurricane (1957; unverified)
  • The Price of Murder (1957)
  • The Empty Trap (1957)
  • A Man of Affairs (1957)
  • The Deceivers (1958)
  • Soft Touch (1958)
  • The Executioners (1958; aka Cape Fear)
  • Clemmie (1958)
  • Deadly Welcome (1958)
  • Please Write For Details (1959)
  • The Crossroads (1959)
  • The Beach Girls (1959)
  • Slam The Big Door (1960)
  • The End of the Night (1960)
  • The Only Girl In The Game (1960)
  • Where Is Janice Gantry? (1960)
  • One Monday We Killed Them All (1961)
  • A Key To the Suite (1962)
  • A Flash of Green (1962)
  • The Girl, The Gold Watch and Everything (1962)
  • On the Run (1963)
  • I Could Go On Singing (1963)
  • The Drowner (1963)
  • The Deep Blue Goodbye (1964) ...
  • Nightmare in Pink (1964) ..
  • A Purple Place for Dying (1964) ...
  • The Quick Red Fox (1964) .
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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

[ Edited ]

 

NON-FICTION

  • The House Guests (1965)
  • No Deadly Drug (1968)
  • A Friendship: The Letters of Dan Rowan and John D. MacDonald 1967-1974 (1986)
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http://www.thrillingdetective.com/travis.html

 


Travis McGee
Created by John D. MacDonald
 (1916-86)

"Travis McGee is the last of the great knights-errant: honorable, sensual, skillful, and tough. I canít think of anyone who has replaced him. I canít think of anyone who would dare"
--
 Donald Westlake

Beach bum. Salvage consultant. Recoverer of misplaced goods. Ladies' man. Mender of broken hearts. Environmentalist. Crank. Amateur sex therapist. Former college football star. Decorated soldier. Connaiseur of gin. Man's man, and ladies' man. Cynical knight errant.

Colourful TRAVIS MCGEE is taking his retirement on the installment plan, working when he needs to. He lives on his "yacht," The Busted Flush, a 52-foot barge type houseboat with twin diesels, at the Fort Lauderdale marina and lives the good life, all financed by his job as a "salvage consultant."

What he actually does is recover missing or stolen goods for half their value, operating in the gray area between black and white, ocassionally accompanied by his best friend and next boat neighbor Meyer, a respected economist.

From his debut in 1964 with The Deep Blue Goodbye, to his final appearance in 1984's The Lonely Silver Rain, the tall, sandy-haired McGee appeared in twenty-one novels, each with a colour in the title, and remains one of the best, and most beloved private eyes of all time (even if he wasn't licensed, and at times acted more like Robin Hood than Philip Marlowe).

Although the books sold like hotcakes, they never quite made the jump successfully into another medium. A 1970 theatrical release, Darker Than Amber, featuring the suitably-chunky Rod Taylor as McGee, was disappointing. Taylor wasn't bad in the role, but the acting in the flick is so wooden you could get splinters in your eyes watching it too closely. Nice location shots, though, and the bad guy was genuinely creepy.

But a 1983 made-for-TV film, The Empty Copper Sea (and pilot for a potential series) was just wrong, wrong, wrong, no matter how you looked at it. Somnolent Magnum P.I./Marlboro Man-lookalike Sam Elliot wasn't even a half-good choice to play McGee, even if he could wake up. And substituting California for McGee's beloved Florida? A series was never developed from this sorry mess. Thank god.

The McGee books did, however, gave birth to a whole sub-genre of detective fiction -- the Florida adventurer. MacDonald's concerns over the ecological rape of Florida and his disgust for the greedy, corrupt forces that are drive it are reflected in Geoffrey Norman's Morgan Hunt, James Hall's Thorn, John Lutz's Carver and Carl Hiassen's crazed desparadoes and lost rescuers. It's there that the true spirit of MacDonald's tarnished, shambling beach bum knight lives on.

RUMOURS

  • One of the more enduring myths in the P.I. genre is that there is a final McGee, A Black Border for McGee, locked away somewhere. However, despite comments made by MacDonald himself, shortly before his death, both his widow and his publisher deny that any such book exists. But the final book in the series, The Lonely Silver Rain (1984), does have a rather elegiac feel to it, as if both MacDonald and McGee knew that their time was over. As George Pelecanos has pointed out, McGee was "the embodiment of (early 60s) male wish-fulfillment." That the series lasted so long is a testament not just to McGee's character, but to MacDonald's ability to tell a story, and captivate an audience.

THE EVIDENCE

  • "Being an adult means accepting those situations where no action is possible."
    -- Travis in 
    The Green Ripper (1979)

  • "Now, of course, having failed in every attempt to subdue the Glades by frontal attack, we are slowly killing it off by tapping the River of Grass. In the questionable name of progress, the state in its vast wisdom lets every two-bit developer divert the flow into drag-lined canals that give him 'waterfront' lots to sell. As far north as Corkscrew Swamp, virgin stands of ancient bald cypress are dying. All the area north of Copeland had been logged out, and will never come back. As the glades dry, the big fires come with increasing frequency. The ecology is changing with egret colonies dwindling, mullet getting scarce, mangrove dying of new diseases born of dryness."
    -- Travis in 
    Bright Orange for a Shroud (1965)

UNDER OATH

  • "Commercially speaking, there has never been a smarter creation than Travis McGee. He is the embodiment of male wish-fulfillment. No nine-to-five job, lives by his own set of rules, resides on a houseboat, drinks but is not a drunk, tall, handsome, good with his fists but not a bully, etc. All of the women McGee sleeps with are built like centerfolds, and, more importantly, most of them conveniently kick before that bothersome issue of commitment comes to the forefront (one mystery store in New York actually has an annual Travis McGee Always the Bridesmaid Never the Bride Award in honor of the latest murdered female companion to a male series character). So McGee is the man we--okay, most of us--would like to see when we look in the mirror. And, yeah, I love the books. I even named my old dog, Travis, after McGee."
    "The McGee books are early 60s timepieces (the hero's Hefner-like, paternal attitude towards women) in the same way that Spillane's books represent a certain kind of attitude (paranoid, racist, homophobic) from the 50s. Think of them on one hand as social records, and try not to judge them from the perspective of our more "enlightened" present. When a modern writer tries to approximate that attitude in a period book (for the sake of his own street-cred or to maintain a rep of cool) is when the issue becomes more complicated and problematic."
    -- George Pelecanos, author of 
    Right As Rain, on Rara Avis, April 2001
    .
  • "... possibly the old houseboat is tied there still; McGee on deck, tending to fresh bruises, sipping his Boodles; watching the sun slide from the sky over Las Olas Boulevard... Anyway, that's what I want to believe. If he's gone, I prefer not to know."
    -- Carl Hiaasen ponders McGee's current whereabouts
    .
  • "One of the great sagas in American fiction."
    --
     Robert B. Parker

  • "To diggers a thousand years from now...the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen."
    -- Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

  • "Travis McGee had the right idea. Retirement days should be taken early and often."
    -- J. Michael Blue, in his novel 
    Justified Crimes
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FILMS

  • MAN-TRAP
    (aka Deadlock, Restless)
    (1961)
    Black and white
    93 minutes
    Based on the story "Taint of the Tiger" by John D. MacDonald
    Screenplay by Ed Waters
    Directed by Edmond O'Brien
    Starring Jeffrey Hunter, David Janssen, Stella Stevens, Elaine Devry, Arthur Batanides, Perry Lopez, Bernard Fein, Virginia Gregg, Mike Vandever, Hugh Sanders, Tol Avery, Bob Crane
    Two Korean War vets team up to rip off some central American revolutionaries. Rare directing job by actor O'Brien.
    .
    Man-Trap  
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CAPE FEAR...
(1962)
Black and white
105 minutes
Based on the novel The Executioners by John D. MacDonald
Screenplay by James R. Webb
Directed by J. Lee Thompson
Starring Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen, Robert Mitchum, Martin Balsam, Lori Martin, Jack Kruschen, Telly Savalas
Mitchum, in arguably his performance role ever, is evil incarnate here, positively repitilian, as an ex-con bent on revenge. Peck wrings his hands a lot.

 

Cape Fear  

Cape Fear  

Cape Fear  

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http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/jdm.html

 

Kona Coast  

 

KONA COAST
(1968, Warner brothers/Seven Arts)
93 minutes
Based on the story "Bimini Gall" by John D. MacDonald
Screenplay by Gilbert Ralston
Directed by Lamont Johnson
Produced by Lamont Johnson
Original music by Jack Marshall
Cinematography by Joseph LaShelle
Starring Richard Boone, Vera Miles, Joan Blondell, Steve Ihnat, Chips Rafferty, Kent Smith, Sam Kapu Jr., Gina Villines, Duane Eddy, Scott Thomas, Erwin Neal, Doris Erikson, 'Lucky' Luck
A stinky, cheesy but enjoyable Hawaiian romp as Capt. Sam Moran (Boone), a fishing boat skipper, searches for a missing party girl. Good local colour.

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http://www.thrillingdetective.com/trivia/jdm.html

 

Darker than Amber (Travis McGee Series #7)  

 

DARKER THAN AMBER
(1970, National General)
Based on the novel by John D. MacDonald
Directed by Robert Clouse
Starring Rod Taylor as TRAVIS McGEE

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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

TELEVISION

  • THE EMPTY COPPER SEA
  • The Empty Copper Sea  

  • (aka "Travis McGee: The Empty Copper Sea")
    (1983)
    Made-for-television film/pilot
    Based on "The Empty Copper Sea" by John D. MacDonald
    Screenplay by Sterling Silliphant
    Directed by Andrew V. McLaglin
    Starring Sam Elliot as TRAVIS McGEE
    Also starring 
    Gene Evans, Katharine Ross, Vera Miles, Amy Madigan, Richard Farnsworth, Geoffrey Lewis
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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

ALSO OF INTEREST

  • "Green Gravy for the Blush" (March 1971, EQMM; Travis McGee parody by Jon Breen )

The Official Travis McGee Quiz Book  

John D. MacDonald and the Colorful World of Travis McGee  

Ballroom of the Skies  

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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD

RELATED LINKS

  • The Trap of Solid Gold
    Long-time MacDonald fan Steve Scott (he assisted Walter and Jean Shine on their second edition of their definitive MacDonald bibliography) has created a truly great blog, featuring in-depth analysis of all all the novels and many of the short stories, plus a great selection of the author's views on writing and other authors.

  • The Travis McGee Series by John D. MacDonald
    Another fan site, and a lot of fun. As well as the book-by-book breakdown, and a collection of quotes, there's also a selection of Boat bum Cuisine, complete with recipes for such treats as Meyer's Memorable Chili and McGee's Special Martini.

  • Gold Medal Author: John D. MacDonald
    This site is run by a Gold Medal book fanatic, the paperback publisher of so many great private eyes. This page has all the original cover art of all the McGee's, as well as MacDonald's non-series books,along with the back cover blurbs of the plots. My only real gripe is that it's arranged alphabetically by title, instead of chronologically.

  • Sometimes I Wish I Lived on a Houseboat
    Tom Dooley's personable, personal essay on why he wants to be Travis McGee (like, don't we all?). It serves as a perfect intro to the beloved beach bum PI.  There's an outline of the character and an enlightening passage fromFree Fall in Crimson.

  • The Travis McGee Fan Club
    Yahoo! Club's mailing list for all things JDMish. Our own Bluefox808 docks there frequently. Drop by and say "Hey!"

  • McGee's Little Black Book
    Let's face it -- the dude got around.

  • Jean Pearson
    This site's entry on Lori Stone's detective hero, who may or may not be McGee's long-lost lovechild. The allusions fall like the lonely silver rain.... 

  • The Children of Travis McGee
    The literary descendants of our man Trav.

Source: http://www.thrillingdetective.com/travis.html

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http://www.nytimes.com/1986/12/29/obituaries/john-d-macdonald-novelist-is-dead.html

JOHN D. MACDONALD, NOVELIST, IS DEAD

 

 

John D. MacDonald, the novelist whose best-selling mysteries sold millions of copies, died yesterday at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee of complications from heart surgery. He was 70 years old and lived in Sarasota, Fla. Claire Ferraro, associate publisher at Ballantine/Del Rey and Fawcett, said Mr. MacDonald underwent bypass surgery in September and had been in a coma since Dec. 10 . From a modest beginning in 1946 with the sale of a short story for $25, Mr. MacDonald's writing career blossomed to produce about 70 books. Of those, 21 made up the highly successful Travis McGee series - about the adventures of a tough, cynical, philosophical knight-errant living on a houseboat in Florida.

 

This is from the NYT archives - the full obituary isn't available (at least not without charge).

 

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http://www.pulpserenade.com/2009/02/cry-hard-cry-fast-by-john-d-macdonald.html

 

Pulp Serenade

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2009

"Cry Hard Cry Fast" by John D. MacDonald (1955)

 

 

Cry Hard, Cry Fast  

Cry Hard, Cry Fast  

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[For this week's Friday's Forgotten Books, I am reviewing John D. MacDonald's Cry Hard Cry Fast. It was originally published as Gold Medal #1739 in 1955. The edition I read was a reprint, Popular Library #6271 from 1958.]

John D. MacDonald wasn't kidding around when he titled a bookCry Hard Cry Fast (Gold Medal, 1955) – it’s a book that continually catches you off guard, and takes you to new and surprising, and often dark, places in every chapter. This book is a prime example of how noir writing is not only restricted to private detectives, dames, murderers, and dark rainy alleys. Cry Hard Cry Fast takes place on an average day in an average city, and its protagonists are ordinary citizens, and their tragedies could – and do – happen everyday. And perhaps that is what makes the book so haunting, and so impossible to put down.

MacDonald structures the novel in an original and innovative way. The opening sentence begins by foreshadowing a car crash. Each of the first six chapters takes the point-of-view of one of the cars involved in the accident and describes their lives leading up to the moment of impact. One man, distraught by the recent death of his wife, takes to the road hoping to get his life back together; another couple has gone on a second honeymoon in attempt to revive their failing marriage; a moody adolescent girl, bored with her provincial life and immature boyfriend, is forced on a family vacation; a pair of bank robbers are fleeing with $42,000 in the trunk and a blonde in the backseat – these are but a few of the characters involved in the crash. And each of their lives is just as desperate as the rest. They take to the road because they are dissatisfied with their lives, and see no escape from the routine of monotony and unhappiness.

Subsequent chapters are similarly self-contained narratives of characters that become involved in the master narrative of the highway accident. There is the tow-truck driver, sickened by the vulture-like nature of his competitors who prowl the highways waiting for death; the doctor who, discontented with his upper-class life, opened the local hospital; and various witnesses to the crash, some that helped and some that fled. MacDonald does an incredible job at packing everyone’s story into a few powerful pages. The characters each come to life in the space of mere sentences, and continue to live on well after their narrative has ended. Like ghosts unable to rest in peace, their despondent vestiges are present throughout.

Published almost a decade before the Travis McGee series began, Cry Hard Cry Fast is brimming with MacDonald’s characteristic perceptions and rich vocabulary. What would be nothing but a cliché in the hands of most writers becomes a fresh experience with MacDonald. His evocative description of sounds and lucid visions of the crash are particularly impressive. Among the most prolific of pulp writers, MacDonald completed no less than three novels and several short stories in 1955, and who knows how many other projects he was also working on simultaneously. Those looking to learn more about John D. MacDonald should head over to Mystery*File to read this insightful interview by Ed Gorman

 

Thrilling Detective also has an informative bio and an extensive bibliography that will make your ja...

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Continued...

 

 

Picking my favorite quotes from Cry Hard Cry Fast was a joy. One could open to a random page and find an example of MacDonald’s stunning prose. Here are but a few examples for your enjoyment. Anyone that has favorite quotes or passages from any of his books and stories is encouraged to add them in the comments section.

“His childhood had been served, as a sentence is served, in that emotional wasteland of a home which should have been broken and was not – a home where hate is a voice beyond a closed door, where contempt is a long intercepted look, where violence is a palpable thing in the silent rooms.”

“He knew he needed sleep. His face felt granular. Every once in a while his eyes would swim and he’d have to shake his head. Twelve hours’ steady driving was about as much as a man could take.”

“Yet all accusations, all conflict was forgotten when his strong hands were here and here, when muscles bunched his back, when the sledge came down from the sky and struck the anvil and, with spark shower, burst it asunder.”

“The crash was like a great slow thick-throated coughing sound containing bright sharp fragments in abrupt frequencies. As the initial sound of the crash passed its greatest peak, yet before it had died away, the second crash built it back to yet a higher intensity. Then, in diminuendo came the lesser impacts, descending to the recognizability of clash of fenders, rip of white metal. The quake of the shock quivered the roadside trees. Meadow birds circled wildly, crying out.”

“The door burst open and she was hurled out. In the final moment before the blackness, she felt acute irritation with the formlessness, the messiness of it. This was destruction and waste, devoid of pattern and meaning. She would be helpless among strangers.”

“The false dawn had paled the east. A truck made a thin insect whine in the distance, coming closer. He stood and listened to it. It went by at last, trailing a long sonorous unending burp. Frazier ran his hands through his hair and shuddered.”

“It had started like a thunderstorm, and now it settled down to a long warm steady rain – tears without thought or reason. Just tears.”

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There's a LOT more online about John D. MacDonald, so feel free to add links, plus your own comments and - if you want - your own reviews.

 

I was surprised that so many of his books are still in print - that hasn't been the case with most of the classic authors we've featured here.

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Re: American Mystery Classics - JOHN D. MACDONALD


becke_davis wrote:

http://www.jdmhomepage.org/liars-club.html

 

LIAR'S CLUB

 

Friday Lunch Bunch..also known as the Liars’ Club

 

 

This group, started in the 50’s, still meets, although with a different cast of characters.  One part of the weekly event involved playing “Indian Poker,” and records of the group indicate that JDM was “fair to middlin,” as they say.  Serial numbers of dollar bills were used to make a hand, and each player held a dollar bill on his forehead while reading what the other players had on their foreheads, and then betting.

 

Conversations revolved around writing, agents, and anything else the group wanted to talk about.  It was at one of the gatherings where MckInley Kantor bet JDM he could not write a “good”novel.  The result:  The Executioners.

 



That sounds like an interesting game!

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia