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becke_davis
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Re: Is This An Author Worth Looking Into?

I was going to post this the first week of the month, but since that didn't happen I'll hold off to give you all more time to read. Then, if you want, I can post two classic author features, as we've discussed below. Would that work for you all?

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becke_davis
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Re: American Mystery Classics Schedule

Originally we had Doris Miles Disney on the schedule for November, but we've already featured her. I think we decided to feature Anna Katherine Green for November - does that work for you all? I know you haven't had time to read her books, but that's okay.

 

Another author we should add to the schedule is Dorothy Salisbury Davis: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Salisbury_Davis

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basson_mommy12
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Re: American Mystery Classics Schedule

I just downloaded

That Affair Next Door  

"The Answer to the Great Question of ... Life, the Universe and Everything ... (is) 42." -- Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

Ruth W.
Grand Rapids, MI
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becke_davis
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Re: Got Books?

Okay, I've lost track. I'm not sure we even picked an author for January 2013. Suggestions?

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becke_davis
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Re: Got Books?


becke_davis wrote:

Okay, I've lost track. I'm not sure we even picked an author for January 2013. Suggestions?


Also, I'm pretty sure I missed one or two people we were going to feature in 2012. Memory. Like. A. Freaking. Sieve. - That's me!

 

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dulcinea3
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Re: Got Books?

[ Edited ]

I'm pretty sure we didn't get to Raymond Chandler (December), and I can't remember if we did John D. MacDonald (November).  As the year went on, it started to change so much it was hard to keep track!  And I think we had come up with some more suggestions at one point, but can't remember exactly when; would have to search this whole thread, I guess.

 

I was thinking that we could come up with more American classic authors, or maybe even alternate and do British one year, and American the next.  What does everyone think?

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becke_davis
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Re: Got Books?


dulcinea3 wrote:

I'm pretty sure we didn't get to Raymond Chandler (December), and I can't remember if we did John D. MacDonald (November).  As the year went on, it started to change so much it was hard to keep track!  And I think we had come up with some more suggestions at one point, but can't remember exactly when; would have to search this whole thread, I guess.

 

I was thinking that we could come up with more American classic authors, or maybe even alternate and do British one year, and American the next.  What does everyone think?


Good grief, I missed two of them! Okay, let's pick one and do it this month. I'd also like to add Dorothy Salisbury Davis.

 

Who do you all pick for this month?

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becke_davis
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Re: Got Books?

I think I posted Anna Katherine Green in November, and I'm sure that one was late...

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dulcinea3
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Re: Got Books?

I went through the thread and found these suggestions (mostly from Fricka):

 

Eric Ambler

Earl Der Biggers (Charlie Chan books)

Anthony Boucher

Ray Bradbury

James M. Cain

John Dickson Carr (also wrote under the names Carter Dickson, Carr Dickson)

Ross MacDonald

William Faulkner

Donald Westlake

Carolyn Keene

Franklin W. Dixon

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becke_davis
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Re: Got Books?

These are all good choices. The big mystery conference, Bouchercon, was named in honor of Anthony Boucher. A Cincinnati author and friend, Jeffrey Marks, has visited the Mystery Forum several times. He also wrote this book - and won some major awards for it!

 

Anthony Boucher  

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becke_davis
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becke_davis
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Re: John D. MacDonald

The last two features were John D. MacDonald and Dorothy Salisbury Davis.

 

Who would you like next?

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Ryan_G
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Re: John D. MacDonald

Can we do the duo that made up Patrick Quentin?

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

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becke_davis
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Patrick Quentin

[ Edited ]

Ryan_G wrote:

Can we do the duo that made up Patrick Quentin?


I had to check Wikipedia about this one:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Quentin

 

 

History

 

In 1931 Richard Wilson Webb (born in 1901 in Burnham-on-SeaSomerset, an Englishman working for a pharmaceutical company inPhiladelphia) and Martha Mott Kelley collaborated on the detective novel Cottage Sinister. Kelley was known as Patsy (Patsy Kelly was a well-known character actress of that era) and Webb as Rick, so they created the pseudonym Q. Patrick by combining their nicknames—adding the Q "because it was unusual".

Webb's and Kelley's literary partnership ended with Kelley's marriage to Stephen Wilson. Webb continued to write under the Q. Patrick name, while looking for a new writing partner. Although he wrote two novels with the journalist and Harper's Bazaar editor Mary Louise Aswell, he would find his permanent collaborator in Hugh Wheeler, a Londoner who had moved to the US in 1934.

 

Wheeler's and Webb's first collaboration was published in 1936. That same year, they introduced two new pseudonyms: Murder Gone to Earth, the first novel featuring Dr. Westlake, was credited to Jonathan Stagge, a name they would continue to use for the rest of the Westlake series. A Puzzle for Fools introduced Peter Duluth and was signed Patrick Quentin. This would become their primary and most famous pen name, even though they also continued to use Q. Patrick until the end of their collaboration (particularly for Inspector Trant stories).

 

In the late 1940s, Webb's contributions gradually decreased due to health problems. From the 1950s and on, Wheeler continued writing as Patrick Quentin on his own, and also had one book published under his own name. In the 1960s and '70s, Wheeler achieved success as a playwright and librettist, and his output as Quentin Patrick slowed and then ceased altogether after 1965. However, Wheeler did write the book for the 1979 musical Sweeney Todd about a fictional London mass murderer, showing he had not altogether abandoned the genre.

 

Writing

The early Q. Patrick detective stories generally follow the Golden Age "whodunit" conventions, with elaborate puzzle mysteries reminiscent of Agatha Christie or John Dickson Carr. From the time when Wheeler joined the writing, the stories become more psychologically acute, with increasingly realistic, fleshed-out characters. In the 1940s, the stories start to move away from the traditional detective pattern (with mixed success): Puzzle for Fiends is a Hitchcockian thriller, Puzzle for Pilgrims a film noir in written form, and Run to Death a pulpy spy novel.

 

The majority of the Webb-Wheeler collaborations feature one of their recurring characters: Peter Duluth, a Broadway director, WWII veteran and recovering alcoholic who, with his wife Iris, always seems to stumble across murders; Inspector Timothy Trant of the New York Police, a Princeton-educated dandy whose remorseless investigations often seem to be aimed at some innocent person before he reveals his real target; and the country doctor, Dr. Hugh Cavendish Westlake with his daughter Dawn. When Webb bowed out on the writing, these characters disappeared or receded into the background.

 

The late Patrick Quentin novels are increasingly dark and brooding. Deceit and betrayal, particularly adultery, already a frequent theme, becomes even more central. Although at the end of the story the murder is solved, the impact of the crime, and the corruption uncovered in the investigation, remain.

 

Legacy

At one time a relatively popular mystery writer (Francis Iles called Quentin "number one among American crime writers"), Quentin has largely fallen into obscurity in the US, his works out of print. He probably remains more well known in Scandinavia, where he used to be among the most famous detective writers, although his reputation is fading also there.