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becke_davis
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Book Covers

http:///kayespenguinposts.blogspot.com  

 

The above is a link to a book review blog by one of our participants, momgee.  In one of the blogs, she mentions that she likes to see "eyes" on a cover, and regrets the trend away from that.  Personally, I don't want to see a face on a book cover, because the model rarely matches my mental image of the character.  I prefer to leave the facial features to my imagination.

 

What do the rest of you think?  Any other comments about book covers?  Which covers do you love, or hate? 

Author
Beth_Groundwater
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Registered: ‎03-30-2009
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Re: Book Covers

I like covers that give me a sense of the tone and subject of the book, so when I look at the cover, I have an idea what I'll be feeling when I read it. A romance cover should be romantic and a horror cover should be scary, for example. I'm very happy with the covers for my two mysteries. The murder weapon, a gun, is shown on the cover of A Real Basket Case, and the X'ed skis in the snow of To Hell in a Handbasket show there's been an accident and that the setting is winter sports. In both cases, the bow wrapped around the cover as if the book is a gift indicates the sleuth's occupation, gift basket designer. Designing covers is a real art, and I tip my hat to the artists. I certainly couldn't come up with the ideas they do! To see what I'm talking about, go to:

 

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?ATH=Beth+Groundwater

 

 

 

--
Beth Groundwater, http://bethgroundwater.com/
DEADLY CURRENTS, 03/11, A REAL BASKET CASE re-release, 11/11
WICKED EDDIES, 05/12, TO HELL IN A HANDBASKET re-release, 11/12
FATAL DESCENT, 06/13, A BASKET OF TROUBLE, 11/13
Moderator
becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers

I especially like the cover of To Hell in a Handbasket.  Just a note, Beth will be a Tuesday visiting author when THH comes out in May.

 

To Hell in a Handbasket 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Book Covers

A lot of the mystery paperbacks that I bought back in the 70s or so, by authors like Agatha Christie and Ngaio Marsh, would have a collection of items on the cover, that figured in the story in some way.  It was always fun to look for them while reading the story.  Sometimes I think I never figured out where they turned up, but usually I found them.  Some might be significant, some might figure in red herrings, and some were just incidental to the plot.
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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers


dulcinea3 wrote:
A lot of the mystery paperbacks that I bought back in the 70s or so, by authors like Agatha Christie and Ngaio Marsh, would have a collection of items on the cover, that figured in the story in some way.  It was always fun to look for them while reading the story.  Sometimes I think I never figured out where they turned up, but usually I found them.  Some might be significant, some might figure in red herrings, and some were just incidental to the plot.
Oh yes, I always liked those Agatha Christie covers, too!  I don't like covers with people on the covers, because they so rarely look the way they are described in the book.

 

Author
RosemaryH
Posts: 119
Registered: ‎03-02-2007
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Re: Book Covers

I frequently buy books based on the covers..I love going to the trade paperback table and looking for the most interesting covers. It says something about how the publisher is positioning the book. I don't think I'd like a face on any of the covers for the Dirty Business series....although I didn't think I'd like pink and I wound up loving the cover for The Big Dirt Nap. The next book in the series is called Deadhead..any ideas for covers?

 

rosemary


Learn more about Pushing Up Daisies.
Correspondent
momgee
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Registered: ‎07-24-2007
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Re: Book Covers

hey Becke, my quibble with the new trend is that they are only showing parts of people. It's not necessarily that I want to see "eyes" but that I don't want to see half a subject or one quarter of one. None of those covers I featured gave me any sense of the book what so ever. Personally, I don't particularly like to see people on covers either, but it is the half a person I object too. Especially just showing a person from the waist down. What does that tell me about a book? Nothing! Look at the cover to Galway Bay by Mary Pat Kelly, now that is a cover that is pleasing to my eyes anyway and tells me something about the book. A lot of that post was tongue in cheek with the creepy eye and witness protection anyway. I hope you did enjoy it though. What I found interesting was how many people commented that they do not like this new trend either.  If you come back for another visit, I am doing a little mini interview with Carolyn Hart in honor of her new book coming out, Dare to Die.  Nothing too in depth but just a few questions on which  she was kind enough to share her thoughts. 

 

I hope you have a peacful Easter.

 

Kaye

 

 

 

 

 


becke_davis wrote:

http:///kayespenguinposts.blogspot.com  

 

The above is a link to a book review blog by one of our participants, momgee.  In one of the blogs, she mentions that she likes to see "eyes" on a cover, and regrets the trend away from that.  Personally, I don't want to see a face on a book cover, because the model rarely matches my mental image of the character.  I prefer to leave the facial features to my imagination.

 

What do the rest of you think?  Any other comments about book covers?  Which covers do you love, or hate? 


 

"Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
Groucho Marx
Moderator
becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

While we're on the subject of covers, let's talk about titles, too.

 

How much does a title influence you?  Do you ever buy a book because of either the cover or the title?

 

Marshall Karp, author of THE RABBIT FACTORY, will be visiting us in June, when we feature his book FLIPPING OUT.  He is blogging about book titles today, and I thought he made some interesting points.  Do you agree or disagree with his comments?

 

http://ptbertram.wordpress.com/2009/04/11/titles-what-makes-a-good-one/ 

 

Bloodthirsty   The Rabbit Factory   Flipping Out  

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

I know people are probably tired of me brining up this book but I feel both the newer cover and the title are great

 

 

And Then There Were None 

 

 

 

I think this cover sets the atmosphere for the book really well.  I've seen other covers with the ten little indian figurines and even a cover with a ball of yarn, a bee, and a noose.  That last cover was a paperback book from I don't even know when.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

Ryan, Ryan, Ryan.  I, for one, never get tired of talking about Agatha Christie on this board!
Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

Good I'm glad to hear that.  I started posting on the board when I first signed up for the book clubs but got distracted by other boards.  Now I think I want to come back to the fold.
"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

More than happy to see you here! I have recently decided to include romantic suspense authors here, since there is a fine line, sometimes, between mystery/suspense/romantic suspense, but we'll be visiting with all types of authors throughout the year.  And you can always start your own threads if you want to talk about a particular book.

 

As to Agatha Christie (the goddess of mystery writing, in my opinion), you can search her name at the bottom of the page to track previous discussions about her books and reactivate them. 

Contributor
KarenEOlson
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

I've only ever bought one book because of the cover, and it was ONE RED PAPERCLIP, white with just a red paperclip on the cover, no title, no author name. It was so intriguing I couldn't help myself. I usually buy a book based on what I know about it or the author, not by the cover, or the title. 

 

As an author, I know that the cover does need to be eye catching, and the title needs to be catchy enough so someone just browsing for a book may be intrigued enough to pick it up.

 

When asked if I had any suggestions for the cover of my upcoming book THE MISSING INK, I said I didn't much care, I just didn't want it to be pink. This is the cover:

 

The Missing Ink 

 

 

 

 

Karen E. Olson
THE MISSING INK, NAL/Obsidian, now available
www.kareneolson.com
www.firstoffenders.typepad.com
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too


KarenEOlson wrote:

I've only ever bought one book because of the cover, and it was ONE RED PAPERCLIP, white with just a red paperclip on the cover, no title, no author name. It was so intriguing I couldn't help myself. I usually buy a book based on what I know about it or the author, not by the cover, or the title. 

 

As an author, I know that the cover does need to be eye catching, and the title needs to be catchy enough so someone just browsing for a book may be intrigued enough to pick it up.

 

When asked if I had any suggestions for the cover of my upcoming book THE MISSING INK, I said I didn't much care, I just didn't want it to be pink. This is the cover:

 

The Missing Ink 

 

 

 

 


Karen is going to visit with us in July, on the day her book is released.  I found this book at BN.com, but it doesn't show the cover:
 One Red Paperclip  
 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

I haven't read One Red Paperclip, but I've heard some of the story, assuming it's what I think it is.  Very interesting - was the ultimate ending when he got a house?
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

I haven't read it, but I'm curious about it now, too.  Geez, we have a bunch of night owls here!
Contributor
KarenEOlson
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

Actually, Becke, when you click on the link for One Red Paperclip, that IS the cover. A red paperclip in a sea of white.

Karen E. Olson
THE MISSING INK, NAL/Obsidian, now available
www.kareneolson.com
www.firstoffenders.typepad.com
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers and Titles, too

Thanks, Karen -- I just clicked "Add Product" and it didn't show a graphic there.  What an incredible concept for a cover!
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BAD_dream
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Re: Book Covers

[ Edited ]
Monster 

I agree Becke, I would rather let my imagination conjure up an image than have the image thrown at me from the book cover.  I recently read "Monster" by Frank Peretti, and if you look at that cover, it's a great cover, it's a bit ominous, with the fur and all, but piques the reader's interest by not being too detailed. 

 

Bad dream

Message Edited by BAD_dream on 05-28-2009 12:41 AM
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becke_davis
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Re: Book Covers

You're right, there's something eerily subliminal about that cover!