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becke_davis
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Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

[ Edited ]

Today's guest blog is brought to you by MICHELE DRIER. Her book EDITED FOR DEATH came out in October. Read on!

 

Michele Drier

Mysteries, Vampires and More
The following is from Michele's website: http://www.micheledrier.com/

 

 

I’m a writer.

I’ve been a writer of sorts most of my life.

I’ve written news, features and columns for several daily newspapers in California.

I’ve written successful grants to the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council as well as a host of public and private funding sources for non-profit agencies.

I’ve written annual reports, policy White Papers, newsletters and brochures.

But for the first time, I consider myself a writer.

Come and read excerpts from my two books of different genres, both the first of series.

The first is SNAP, available now in all ebook formats.

The second is Edited for Death, available Oct. 1 from Mainly Murder Press

I hope you enjoy…life’s too short not to laugh.

 

 

http://mainlymurderpress.com/store/author_info.php

 

 

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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

[ Edited ]

ABOUT MICHELE

 

I was born in Santa Cruz, California to a family that migrated west to San Francisco in 1849.

Unfortunately, they never found gold, nor did they buy (and hang onto) any California land.

 

My mother named me Michael, after author and actress Blanche Oelrichs, who wrote under the name of Michael Strange.  After months of saying, “Yes, she’s a girl.  Yes, her name is Michael,” my mother finally caved and I became “Michele.”  I was read to as a child, and needed always to have a book with me.  My maternal grandmother belonged to a writing club in San Francisco in the early part of the 20th century and wrote poems and jingles—one of which won her a travel trailer during the Depression.

I’ve lived in San Francisco, the Bay Area, the Central Valley, the Sierra, Southern California and the North Coast.

 

My first career was in journalism, and I spent seven years as a staff writer with the San Jose Mercury News.  After returning to Humboldt State University to complete school and work on a master’s, I fell into my second career, as a non-profit administrator.

 

I’ve worked in the arts and social services and always considered non-profit management my career passion.

 

I’ve also spent time as a reporter and editor for daily papers in California, including twelve years in management.  I was the city, metro and executive editor for daily newspapers in California’s Central Valley.  During this stint, I was a judge for three years for the California Newspaper Publisher’s Association Better Newspapers competition and won two awards for directing Investigative/Enterprise stories

 

For the last several years, I’ve managed non-profit agencies including a legal organization serving roughly 10,000 senior citizens in Alameda County.  In 2006 and 2007, I was a judge for the selection of Coro Fellows, a national nine-month long fellowship in public agencies and administration run by the Coro Foundation in San Francisco.

 

I’m a member of the Society of California Pioneers and Sisters in Crime and live in California’s Central Valley with a cat, skunks, wild turkeys and an opossum (only the cat gets to come in the house).

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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Remembering the Armistice

 

by Michele Drier

 

Americans celebrate Veterans’ Day every year on November 11.  We have a national holiday, there are Veterans’ Day sales on everything from cars to condiments, soldiers past and present parade, wreaths and flags are put on graves and prayers are said.

 

But how many people know why it’s that day.

 

It’s that day because on November 11, 1918, at 11 a.m., the armistice ending the First World War was signed in a French forest.  And for some 35 years, bells tolled and whistles sounded at 11 a.m. on November 11, to commemorate the Armistice.

 

Over time, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, wars in the Middle East and lots of smaller events (Panama,Grenada) sent troops around the world and Armistice Day became Veterans’ Day, to remember and honor those who serve. But in some places, it’s still Armistice Day.

 

I love to travel and I loveFrance, so a few years ago I spent the first three weeks of November with a friend, a car and a map.  After a few days inParis, we headed south to look for Romans, Crusaders, Plantagenets and wine.  My friend was after wine, chateaux in theLoireValley, French sheep and good food; I was afterCluny, Chinon and the Abbey at Frontrevaud where the effigies of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine lie in perpetual state.

 

We got everything we wanted.  The chateaux ofChambordand Chenonceau, the ruins of Chinon where Henry II died, the ruins of the Cathedral of Cluny where Bernard preached the First Crusades.  We even came across a famous cave, not open in the November rain, where human habitation was traced back several thousand years.

 

Still on the medieval trail, we hiked up the hill to the pilgrimage church at Vezelay and walking back down to the car, stopped at a clothing designer’s boutique.  I sometimes wear the horrendously expensive red wool hooded coat that I bought.

 

We had an absolutely memorable five-course lunch inOrleans.  The restaurant and city were decorated for Christmas,  I bought some table linens that I now use for Christmas dinner, oh, and  Joan of Arc’s chain mail armor is inOrleans.

 

There are many things I remember with awe and fondness about that trip.  Centuries of history, good food, dodging the rain, navigating back roads.

 

What I remember best in November every year, though, is the inspiring mix of history and remembrance I saw in Beaune.

 

Deep in the Burgundy countryside, the small town is at the crossroads of premier French Burgundy wine-making.  Driving into the town, we saw signs on small hillside vineyards for various premiere cru wines, startling to two women fromCaliforniawhere vineyards stretch for miles.

 

Beaune is a delightful small French city, and we stayed for a few days, driving around the countryside during the day to find beautiful Burgundian tile-roofed buildings and even smaller French villages.  On November 11, a Wednesday, we planned to spend the morning in Beaune, shopping and visiting a couple of small museums.  We had just come out of a store near the main plaza when we heard music.  The shopkeeper came out behind us, closing and locking the door.

 

Suddenly, we realized that the street in front of us was full of people, all walking toward something and being lead by the municipal band, a group of musicians from teens to seniors.  It looked as though most of the population had poured into the street to watch whatever was happening.  We joined the crowd—men, children, moms pushing strollers with babies—not sure what was next, and followed it and the band to a small park just off the main road.

 

The crowd stopped and a group of men carrying flags came marching up to a statue in the middle of the park.  We must have looked stunned, because a woman next to us explained it was in honor of Armistice Day.  The marchers, led by a Boy Scout troop, were dressed in their every day civilian clothes, over which they’d pinned medals and ribbons.  They ranged in age from their late twenties to their eighties, all mixed together in a group, and surrounded the statue.

 

Some politician, maybe the mayor, gave a very short speech; a very old man was helped up to the microphone and made comments, the band played a few selections and a woman spoke.  The woman near us said that the speaker was remembering the town’s children who disappeared during the Second World War.  “Taken by the Bouche,” she said with disgust. 

 

The band played The Marseilles, people sang along, the crowd drifted away.  Armistice Day was over.

 

But in that short time, the town of Beaune turned out to remember all of the people who gave their lives over the past almost century to keep their town and their country French, and as safe as they could.

 

There wasn’t any bravado, nobody worked the crowd, there weren’t any precision marchers, just several hundred every-day French citizens who closed their shops, factories and schools for about an hour to come together to honor and remember their fellow-citizens. 

 

Everywhere inEuropethe past is also the present.  People live in both worlds and remember. 

 

The honesty and simplicity that the people of Beaune evidenced made a day of remembrance that I’ll always remember.

 

Michele Drier’s newest mystery, Edited for Death, is underscored by events at the end of the Second World War in Germany, which still resonate today.

 

 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Michele - Thank you so much for a very thought-provoking guest blog. 

 

I've already had several people mention your book to me this morning. Your title is a real eye-catcher! 

 

FYI, Fricka started a conversation about this book on the "Welcome" thread, too. 

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maxcat
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Hi, Michele, a lovely blog about Nov. 11. It's good to see Europeans celebrate that day in  their own way.  I'm glad you could blog to us and hope your holidays are merry.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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eadieburke
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

[ Edited ]

Michele wrote:

 

For the last several years, I’ve managed non-profit agencies including a legal organization serving roughly 10,000 senior citizens in Alameda County. 

___________________________________________________

 

Michele:

 

I will definitely have to check out your books, SNAP and EDITED FOR DEATH. I enjoyed your blog and the part of your bio where you mentioned non-profit agencies and senior citizens.

 

I have been involved with community service for a long time. From 1987 through 2007, I had a business called SENIOR NEWS. I sold ads for 6 senior centers. They would give me their news and I would publish their newsletters and the ads paid for the publishing. The centers were very grateful as they didn't have computers in 1987. They were using copiers and their newsletters were not too professional looking. Through the years, I helped them get used computers and taught senior citizen basic computer classes. By 2007, they were publishing their own newsletters and selling the ads.

 

Also from 1997 until 2008, I was on the borough council of my Borough of Perkasie, PA. I was also council president from 2004 until 2008.

 

My husband and I were also involved with Kiwanis and he was Govenor for the Kiwanis of PA during 2007. I started a Kiwanis Club in Perkasie as he wanted to start 10 new clubs in PA during his 2007 term as Govenor. He has also been on the board of various non-profits: United Way, Boy and Girls Club and North Penn Visiting Nurses.

 

Now, I spend most of my time reading and hanging out here with Becke and Friends.

 

I hope you enjoy your time visiting with us and I will definitely check out your books!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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MicheleD91
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Eadie,

 

Thanks for your note!  Your experience with the senior centers is a wonderful example of the impact one person can make in so many lives. And it seems that you and your husband are still giving back to the community!  I wish you all the best and I'd love to hear how you liked SNAP and Edited for Death.

 

Best,

Michele

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becke_davis
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Message from Michele:

 

Hi,

I’m excited!  My mystery, Edited for Death, made the Memorable Books for 2011 on the DorothyL list!  This as well as the Midwest Book Review, “ "Edited for Death" is a riveting and much recommended pick for general fiction and mystery collections.”

 

I’m pretty happy!

 

Best,

Michele

www.micheledrier.com

 

 

CONGRATULATIONS, MICHELE!

 


 

Edited for Death

SNAP: The World Unfolds


 

 

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JeanHarrington
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Enjoyed the story of your name, Michele.  As every writer knows, names are so important.  They define us--and our characters.  Also am intrigued by the title of your mystery Edited for Death.  Lwill have to look for it.  The intrigues me, to be honest, for my mystery released on January 2, is Designed for Death.  No vampires in mine though.  Still we're on a similar track titlewise.  Best of luck to you and your writings.  Cheers.   

Jean Harrington
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becke_davis
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!


JeanHarrington wrote:

Enjoyed the story of your name, Michele.  As every writer knows, names are so important.  They define us--and our characters.  Also am intrigued by the title of your mystery Edited for Death.  Lwill have to look for it.  The intrigues me, to be honest, for my mystery released on January 2, is Designed for Death.  No vampires in mine though.  Still we're on a similar track titlewise.  Best of luck to you and your writings.  Cheers.   


I agree that names are important. I sometimes wonder if I started writing fiction just so I could use some of the names I love - I only had two kids, but I stuck them both with two middle names. 

 

A funny story about names - I'm fascinated by genealogy and I've been slowly deciphering a journal of my great-great-grandfather's. He was a poor preacher - he only had two children himself, and only one survived to adulthood. His older sister had several children, though. 

 

In his journal, he writes about the events surrounding the birth of one of her daughters. Since her family was rather poor, too, he said she and her husband gave her multiple names, each name selected because it belonged to a wealthy matron in their small community. That was a sure way to ensure the women so honored would take an interest in the child's welfare and bestow them with gifts!!

 

My great-great-grandfather thought that was pretty funny, and so do I!

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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!

Michelle, Think we "met" once before--on Facebook or Twitter.  I remember being intrigued by how similar the names of our mystery novels are.  Edited for Death is so like Designed for Death. Strictly accidental, of course.  Mine features an interior designer as the amateur sleuth.  What about Edited?  A protag in the publishing industry?  OPerhaps not.  Just guessing here.  Must research your website.  Anyway, sounds like we're kindrid spirits.  Cheers and good luck with the book. 

Jean Harrington
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becke_davis
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Re: Guest Blog by Author MICHELE DRIER!


JeanHarrington wrote:

Michelle, Think we "met" once before--on Facebook or Twitter.  I remember being intrigued by how similar the names of our mystery novels are.  Edited for Death is so like Designed for Death. Strictly accidental, of course.  Mine features an interior designer as the amateur sleuth.  What about Edited?  A protag in the publishing industry?  OPerhaps not.  Just guessing here.  Must research your website.  Anyway, sounds like we're kindrid spirits.  Cheers and good luck with the book. 


Jean - Your post reminded me of a thread we had going here awhile back. Several people on the boards were reading books with the same title by different authors. It must be frustrating for authors when that happens since, for many authors, they have little input in the title. On the other hand, if the title is the same as, say, a James Patterson book, it might not hurt to have it come up in the same searches!

 

Here's the link:

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Mystery/Title-Themes-and-Overused-Book-Titles/m-p/1148378/hig...