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January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

[ Edited ]

I'm very excited to welcome the mother-son author team who write the highly acclaimed Ian Rutledge series!

 

 

The Red Door (Inspector Ian Rutledge Series #12)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publishers Weekly

Set in 1920, bestseller Todd's 12th mystery to feature the shell-shocked WWI veteran and Scotland Yard inspector Ian Rutledge (after 2008's A Matter of Justice) is one of the strongest entries yet in a series that shows no sign of losing steam. Rutledge first looks into the disappearance of missionary Walter Teller, who suddenly fell ill in London and later apparently walked out of the clinic where he was being treated. Rutledge questions members of Teller's immediate family, including his brothers, Peter and Edwin. After the resolution of the case of the missing missionary, Rutledge investigates the bludgeoning death of Florence Teller, apparently the wife of another Peter Teller, in Lancashire. Once again Todd (the pseudonym of a mother-son writing team) perfectly balance incisive portraits of all the characters, not just the complex and original lead, with a tricky puzzle in which the killer is hidden in plain sight for the discerning reader to discover. (Jan.)

More Reviews and Recommendations

Biography

 

Charles Todd is the author of nine Ian Rutledge mysteries—A Pale HorseA False MirrorA Long ShadowA Cold TreacheryA Fearsome DoubtWatchers of Time,Legacy of the DeadSearch the DarkWings of Fire, and A Test of Wills—and one stand-alone novel. They are a mother-and-son writing team and live in Delaware and North Carolina, respectively.

 

 

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

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Review from B&N:

 

This whodunit is superby harstan

Reader Rating:  5 stars
See Detailed Ratings

December 21, 2009: In 1920, WWI veteran, Scotland Yard inspector Ian Rutledge still struggles with his military time though he successfully is able to investigate crimes (see A Matter of Justice) and conceal his mental issue Hamish even from his astute visiting godfather. Rutledge is assigned the case of the disappearance of missionary Walter Teller, who mentally broke down in London and was taken to a nearby clinic where he apparently left. The inspector questions Walter's family especially focusing on his two brothers, Peter and Edwin.

 

Rutledge is next assigned to look into the Lancashire stabbing murder of Florence Teller, wife of an apparent different Peter Teller than Walter's brother; a Peter who failed to return from the Great War. Still he finds the surnames too coincidental to ignore though he cannot fathom the otherwise link beyond The Red Door that Florence painted for her husband who never came home.

 

Extremely complicated, the latest Inspector Rutledge historical police procedural is a timely thriller on two fronts. First the hero and Walter suffer from post traumatic stress disorder as do many of our soldiers today; second the Spanish Flu of 1918 still leaves fear in many people as does Swine Flu today. The whodunit is super (though Hamish's voice feels somewhat irritating) and the depth of the era is as always insightful without superseding the mystery as team Todd provides another strong Inspector Rutledge tale.

 

Harriet Klausner

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

Here is a link to the Charles Todd website: http://charlestodd.com/

 

And more info from the website:

 

The Red Door

On Sale Now

New York Times bestselling author Charles Todd brings back Scotland Yard detective Ian Rutledge in another riveting mystery set in post–World War I England Lancashire, England, June 1920. In a house with a red door lies the body of a woman who has been bludgeoned to death. Rumor has it that two years earlier, she’d painted that door to welcome her husband back from the Front. Only he never came home.

Meanwhile, in London, a man suffering from a mysterious illness first goes missing and then just as suddenly reappears. He is unable to explain his recovery. His family, supposedly searching for him, give conflicting accounts of where they were and why. What is the secret that nearly drove one man mad and turned his brothers and sister against one another with such unexpected savagery?

READ MORE ABOUT THE RED DOOR >


Praise for The Red Door

“Todd returns with another mystery set in post-World War I England featuring Scotland Yard detective Ian Rutledge. This mother-and-son writing team cleverly weaves in social details and historical facts without slowing the story or the character development. It’s hard not to read about the psychological and physical wounds of war and the fear left by the great flu epidemic of 1918 without feeling a shiver for our own time. The period after the Great War is producing very strong myster novels (Jacqueline Winspear, Barbara Cleverly), and Todd’s are among the best.”
—RT BOOKREVIEWS, ★ ★ ★ ★½

“Inspector Rutledge confronts a war-weary family in 1920.

Where is Walter Teller? An undiagnosed malady has sent him to the Belvedere Clinic. His wife Jenny, his sister Leticia, his brothers Edwin and Peter and their wives Amy and Susannah worry over him, then become alarmed when he disappears. Family members hare off in all directions to find him, reuniting when Scotland Yard sends Inspector Rutledge to help. Nobody seems eager to confide in Rutledge, who, accompanied by the hectoring ghost of Hamish, a soldier he executed during the Great War, wonders if the Tellers of Essex are related to recently murdered Florence Teller, a widow from Hobson. Her husband Peter never returned from the war. Are her Peter and the Essex Peter one and the same? Was she killed to cover up not only bigamy but illegitimacy? And is her death related to Walter’s illness? Peter, his leg gimpy from war wounds, falls downstairs and dies. Jenny, distraught at Peter’s possible perfidy, succumbs to laudanum poisoning. Walter returns, then vanishes again, only to be waylaid himself. While sorting through the family travails, Rutledge must confront a former suitor of Florence with family woes of his own, as well as a triple murderer who’s prowling Westminster Bridge determined to slay Rutledge.

Departing from Rutledge’s earlier cases (A Matter of Justice, 2008, etc.), the caprices of fatherhood take precedence over the iniquities of war this time, with a subdued Hamish and an emotionally reawakening Rutledge along for the ride.

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

Charles and Caroline Todd

 

More from the website:

 

Charles and Caroline Todd are a mother and son writing team who live on the east coast of the United States. Caroline has a BA in English Literature and History, and a Masters in International Relations. Charles has a BA in Communication Studies with an emphasis on Business Management, and a culinary arts degree that means he can boil more than water. Caroline has been married (to the same man) for umpteen years, and Charles is divorced.

Charles and Caroline have a rich storytelling heritage. Both spent many evenings on the porch listening to their fathers and grandfathers reminisce. And a maternal grandmother told marvelous ghost stories. This tradition allows them to write with passion about events before their own time. And an uncle/great uncle who served as a flyer in WWI aroused an early interest in the Great War.

Charles learned the rich history of Britain, including the legends of King Arthur, William Wallace, and other heroes, as a child. Books on Nelson and by Winston Churchill were always at hand. Their many trips to England gave them the opportunity to spend time in villages and the countryside, where there’s a different viewpoint from that of the large cities. Their travels are at the heart of the series they began ten years ago.

Charles’s love of history led him to a study of some of the wars that shape it: the American Civil War, WWI and WWII. He enjoys all things nautical, has an international collection of seashells and has sailed most of his life. Golf is still a hobby that can be both friend and foe. And sports in general are enthusiasms. Charles had a career as a business consultant. This experience gave him an understanding of going to troubled places where no one was glad to see him arrive. This was excellent training for Rutledge’s reception as he tries to find a killer in spite of local resistance.

Caroline has always been a great reader and enjoyed reading aloud, especially poetry that told a story. The Highwayman was one of her early favorites. Her wars are World War 1, the Boer War, and the English Civil War, with a sneaking appreciation of the Wars of the Roses as well. When she’s not writing, she’s traveling the world, gardening or painting in oils. Her background in international affairs backs up her interest in world events, and she’s also a sports fan, an enthusiastic follower of her favorite teams in baseball and pro football. She loves the sea but is a poor sailor—Charles inherited his iron stomach from his father. Still, she has never met a beach she didn’t like.

Both Caroline and Charles also share a love of animals, and family pets have always been rescues. There was once a lizard named Schnickelfritz. Don’t ask.

Writing together is a challenge, and both enjoy giving the other a hard time. The famous quote is that in revenge, Charles crashes Caroline’s computer, and Caroline crashes his parties. Will they survive to write more novels together? Stay tuned! Their father/husband is holding the bets.

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

Click here for details of the authors' book tour: http://charlestodd.com/events/

 

The History of Inspector Ian Rutledge

June 1919 - A TEST OF WILLS

Ian Rutledge, returned home from the trenches of the Great War, loses his fiancée Jean after long months in hospital with what is now called PTSD, and faces a bleak future. Fighting back from the edge of madness, he returns to his career at Scotland Yard. But Chief Superintendent Bowles is determined to break him. And so Rutledge finds himself in Warwickshire where the only witness to the murder of Colonel Harris is a drunken ex-soldier suffering from shell shock Rutledge is fighting his own battles with the voice of Corporal Hamish MacLeod in his head, survivor’s guilt after the bloody 1916 Battle of the Somme. The question is, will he win this test of wills with Hamish—or is the shell shocked man a mirror of what he’ll become if he fails to keep his madness at bay?

July 1919 - WINGS OF FIRE

Rutledge is sent to Cornwall because the Home Office wants to be reassured that Nicholas Cheney wasn’t murdered. But Nicholas committed suicide with his half-sister Olivia. And she’s written a body of war poetry under the name of O.A. Manning. Rutledge, who had used her poetry in the trenches to keep his mind functioning, is shocked to discover she never saw France—and may well be a cold-blooded killer. And yet even dead, she makes a lasting impression that he can’t shake.

August 1919 - SEARCH THE DARK

An out of work ex-soldier, sitting on a train in a Dorset station suddenly sees his dead wife and two small children standing on the platform. He fights to get off the train and soon thereafter, the woman is found murdered and the children are missing. Rutledge is sent to coordinate a search, and finds himself attracted to Aurore, a French war bride who will lie to protect her husband and may have killed because she was jealous of the murder victim’s place in her husband’s life.

September 1919 - LEGACY OF THE DEAD

Just as Rutledge thinks he’s coming to terms—of a sort—with the voice that haunts him, he’s sent to northern England to find the missing daughter of a woman who once slept with a King. Little does he know that his search will take him to Scotland, and to the woman Hamish would have married, if he’d lived. But Fiona is certain to hang for murdering a mother to steal her child, and she doesn’t know that Rutledge killed Hamish on the battlefield when she turns to him for help. He couldn’t save Hamish—but Rutledge is honor bound to protect Fiona and the small child named for him.

October 1919 - WATCHERS OF TIME

Still recovering from the nearly fatal wound he received in Scotland, Rutledge is sent to East Anglia to discover who murdered a priest, and what his death had to do with a dying man who knew secrets about the family that owns the village. But there’s more to the murder than hearing a death-bed confession. And the key might well be a young woman as haunted as Rutledge is, because she survived the Titanic’s sinking and carries her own guilt for failure.

November 1919 - A FEARSOME DOUBT

A case from 1912 comes back to haunt Rutledge. Did he send an innocent man to the gallows? Meanwhile, he’s trying to discover who has poisoned three ex-soldiers, all of them amputees in a small village in Kent. Mercy killings—or murder? And he sees a face across the Guy Fawkes’ Day bonfire that is a terrifying reminder of what happened to him at the end of the war…something he is ashamed of, even though he can’t remember why. What happened in the missing six months of his life?

December 1919 - A COLD TREACHERY

Rutledge is already in the north and the closest man to Westmorland, where at the height of a blizzard, there has been a cold blooded killing of an entire family, save one child, who is missing in the snow. But as the facts unfold, it’s possible that the boy killed his own family. And where is he? Dead in the snow, or hiding? And there are secrets in this isolated village of Urskdale that can lead to more killings.

January 1920 - A LONG SHADOW

A party that begins innocently enough ends with Rutledge finding machine gun casings engraved with death’s heads—a warning. But he’s sent to Northamptonshire to discover why someone shot Constable Ward with an arrow in what the locals call a haunted wood. He discovers there are other deaths unaccounted for, and there’s also a woman who knows too much about Rutledge for his own comfort. Then whoever has been stalking him comes north after him, and Rutledge knows if he doesn’t find the man, he’ll die. Hamish, pushing him hard, is all too aware that Rutledge’s death will mean his own…

February 1920 - A FALSE MIRROR

A man is nearly beaten to death, his wife is taken hostage by his supposed assailant, and Rutledge is sent posthaste to Hampton Regis to find out who wanted Matthew Hamilton dead. But the man who may be guilty is someone Rutledge knew in the war, a reminder that some were lucky enough to be saved, while Hamish was left to die. But this is a story of love gone wrong, and the next two deaths reek of madness. Are they? Or were the women mistaken for the intended victim?

April, 1920 - A PALE HORSE

Death rides a pale horse, and in the shadow of this ancient English chalk-cut horse in Berkshire, death stalks the residents of eight cottages, social lepers each with a past. Has a reckoning already claimed the ninth, whose secret work in the war marked him as an outcast? And who is dead in Yorkshire, shrouded in the robes of repentance? In solving one crime, Rutledge unwittingly unleashes a murderer’s fear for himself. Deeply involved in the search for answers he’s forbidden to uncover, Rutledge is brought face to face with his own past.

May, 1920 - A MATTER OF JUSTICE

As Rutledge takes on what appears to be an open and shut case in Somerset—everyone admits to reasons for murdering the man found bizarrely displayed in a tithe barn, it ought to be simple enough to sort out his killer—there are other forces at work. A long-ago act of merciless cruelty has twisted the lives of three people, and justice is being subverted into revenge, and revenge triggers retribution. One person is willing to carry his knowledge to the gallows and another is prepared to die once a thirst for reprisal is slaked. Rutledge is drawn into a vortex of hatred that threatens to overwhelm him too.

June, 1920 - THE RED DOOR

The Tellers—three brothers and a sister—are a model family. They have no secrets from each other, the brothers have married well, and they each accept their role in seeing to it that such a proud and respected name is carried on. But a piece of information accidentally uncovered, a sudden and inexplicable illness resulting in a disappearance, and a brutal murder half way across England release long-held resentments and jealousies that savage the Tellers. This is a crime so nearly perfect that Rutledge is faced with perfect solutions that only serve to obscure the real truth, and a train crash leads him to question his own future on this anniversary of his return to the Yard one year ago.

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

An Interview with Inspector Ian Rutledge, March 1920.

Interviewer: Inspector Rutledge, you come from a different background than most policemen today–middle class family, father a solicitor, mother an accomplished pianist, yourself university educated. What interested you in police work rather than following your father into the law?

Ian Rutledge: I’d thought I’d settled on becoming an architect—the influence of my godfather, David Trevor. His son Ross and I were close and I spent many weekends with them in London or in their Scottish hunting lodge. Building something seemed permanent and useful. Then a remark my father made when I was ten, I think, changed that. He said the law was created so that everyone could expect a fair and impartial justice. There was a murder trial later that summer, and I asked who spoke for the dead man. He told me that no one did, the man was dead. The police gathered evidence, made an arrest, the killer was brought to trial, and if found guilty, punished. That struck me as odd—why shouldn’t the dead man have a voice in what caused his death? My father replied that the law wasn’t set up that way. By the time I’d come down from university, I realized that I wanted to be that voice. It’s how I approach my cases.

Interviewer: Many of your colleagues came up through the ranks, without benefit of university education. Does this present a problem as the Yard expects more training of its officers?

Rutledge: There has been some, yes. (Interviewer’s note: This appears to be an understatement.) It wasn’t that long ago when people expected a policeman to knock at the tradesmen’s entrance, not the front door of a house. But perceptions have changed, and we’ve grown more professional. We all start as a constable, the man who has walked the streets and knows all the people on his watch. He brings this experience to the table, and it’s a good system. But crime isn’t always a simple matter of greed or anger getting the best of someone. It can move quickly out of a local man’s grasp, and the Yard must step in with a broader perspective. I was recently in Northumberland where a local case spread to several other areas because the facts had been blurred or lost over time. This is where training and education come in to provide a broader picture. And this is where the local man must accept a new approach. This is the future of the Yard, but it isn’t always comfortable in the work day. Use your instinct, your head and your observations, Sergeant Gibson at the Yard told me once, and he’s right. These matter. But you must also bring outside experience to the mix.

Interviewer: Chief Superintendent Bowles is involved with this new view?

Rutledge: (Dryly.) I would say that Chief Superintendent Bowles is daily aware of how times are changing for the Yard.

Interviewer: You spent four years in the trenches—1914-1918. And came home unscathed. On the surface. What do you think saved you there, and what has it brought you in terms of your duties at the Yard?

Rutledge: I don’t think anyone came back from that war unscathed. Some of us have scars that aren’t visible. And they’re as raw as the lost arm, the blinded eye, the gassed lungs. Harder to treat, because those who are scarred in the mind can’t turn to anyone for help. Shell shock is considered cowardice, lack of moral fiber. So such men fight it on their own. Some lose that battle.

Interviewer: You lost your fiancée, I understand, because of the war.

Rutledge: (Interviewer’s note: voice terse.) I released her from the engagement. I was no longer the man she had wanted to marry in 1914. And so I set her free. She’s since married and lives in Canada.

Interviewer: Will you tell us about Hamish MacLeod?

Rutledge: (Interviewer: guardedly) He was one of so many young Scots I led into battle, knowing that most of them wouldn’t come back. It was the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life. But it had to be done, and I was the one who had to do it, then live with it. End of story. But it doesn’t stop their faces from coming back to me.

Interviewer: I understood that Corporal MacLeod was more personal than that.

Rutledge: He was a good soldier. So many of the Scots are, by nature and nurture. I learned to trust his judgment, and I learned to respect his opinions. Standing elbow to elbow with the dead all around you erases a good many barriers of class and rank. You just want to stay alive another hour, another day. We talked when we couldn’t sleep. I got to know him well. And I had to make an example of him for refusing to lead his men back across No Man’s Land that day. Not because he was afraid, but because he knew it was useless, we were going nowhere. The sergeants were dead, the corporals were trying to keep order, and he spoke in front of his men. He left me no choice. (Afterthought) That was probably his intention.

Interviewer: Hamish MacLeod saved your life, all the same.

Rutledge: When the salient blew up, his body covered mine. Yes. I thought he’d saved me to keep me from finding the same peace he’d found. Part of that’s true.. I hear him, I don’t see him, I feel him, I know he’s there, and yet, he’s dead in France, and I don’t believe in ghosts.

Interviewer: You’ve met a number of interesting women in your cases. Do any of them stand out in your mind?

Rutledge: I don’t want to talk about Olivia Marlowe—you know her as the poet O. A. Manning. She’s dead, leave her in peace. All right, yes, her poetry still runs through my head at times. I read her volumes in the trenches. She had something to say to a soldier. I didn’t know then that she was a woman, or that she’d never been to France. Her half-brother Nicholas was there, and she drew on his letters.

Interviewer: What about the young woman in Westmorland? Elizabeth Fraser.

Rutledge: We were both looking for something—peace, a little happiness. There was nothing in the long term for either of us. The isolation in Urskdale made it seem more than it was. And damn it, I nearly got her killed!

Interviewer: Any words you want to say about Meredith Channing?

Rutledge: She’s a friend of friends, and she and I worked well together on a case. She served in France, and she probably knows more about me that I’d like, because of that. Our paths seem to cross uncomfortably often, probably because we move in the same circles.

Interviewer: Tell me something about your cases.

Rutledge: (Short laugh) Before the war I was considered one of the new bright lights. Quick promotion, that sort of thing. And I worked for it. When I was promoted to Inspector I was told I’d developed good instincts, and I’d had a good understanding of people. That helped. And war honed that understanding, you see. You don’t live cheek by jowl with men every day for months on end without learning what makes them what they are beneath the surface. The difference is, I’ve killed. With my own hands. It’s an admission no policeman wants to make. Now that I’m back, Chief Superintendent Bowles prefers to use me outside London. It’s actually more challenging, because I’m often at a scene I don’t know from experience, and I have to build up my local knowledge with or without the help of the policemen on the spot. They’re human, they have their own problems with the Yard coming in and taking over. But the fact is, they keep their patch safe most of the time, and that’s to their credit. I walk away when the case is finished. They stay and face the aftermath of murder.

Interviewer: Have you always got your man—or woman? Is there any case in particular you’d like to discuss here?

Rutledge: You do your best to bring in the killer. However hard it is for those around you, or those left behind. It’s what I’m sent to do. I sometimes take more away that I intended. Mainly because there are so many reminders of the war. But you accept what you are dealt and work with it. Here’s a list of cases you might find interesting. I’d rather not discuss them publicly.

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

There is a discussion of the Ian Rutledge books here: http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Unabashedly-Bookish/Ian-Rutledge-Mysteries-and-the-Fragmentat...

 

If you search "Charles Todd" at B&N, you will find a number of other references to their books from fans here.

 

Here are links to blogs, interviews and reviews related to "Charles Todd:"

 

http://januarymagazine.com/profiles/ctodd.html

 

http://www.harpercollins.com/authors/29184/Charles_Todd/index.aspx

 

http://www.blackravenpress.com/Author%20pages/todds.htm

 

http://www.crimepays.com/todd.htm

 

Here is a review of our featured book: http://detective-fiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/review_of_the_red_door_by_charles_todd


Review of The Red Door by Charles Todd

Inspector Ian Rutledge Returns to Solve Murder in England

Dec 19, 2009 Bonnye Good

The red door serves as a statement of hope with its striking, exuberant optimism overcoming the whitewashed house and accompanying sparse landscape. In a turn typical of Inspector Ian Rutledge’s England, the promise of the red door is quickly snuffed out with the breath of the woman who painted it.

After learning that World War I had finally ended, Florence Teller painted the red door in anticipation of the return of her husband, Lt. Peter Teller. The two had shared a difficult life with the long absences required by the military and the death of their fragile young son Timmy, but Peter’s existence made Florence’s life worth living. While he remained missing, Florence’s only regular companion was Jake, a particular parrot, and the occasional services of a ill-tempered housekeeper and an attentive gardener.

Florence, reclusive but well-liked by the villagers, had a greater impact on others than she might have suspected. When she was found murdered, the local police begin working with Inspector Rutledge of Scotland Yard because of an unusual link to Florence’s last name and the disappearance of a wealthy clergyman named Walter Teller.

Inspector Ian Rutledge and World War I

Set in 1922, the effects of the Great War remain evident among the numbers of widows and fatherless children, men tormented by nightmares and the quietly dying hope that missing soldiers will return to their homesteads.

Rutledge continues to battle his own psychological war wounds voiced by Hamish, a Scottish soldier killed by Rutledge in the trenches. This is no endearing haunting but one that creates a constant tension in Rutledge, causing a loss of his sense of humor and making it nearly impossible to build personal relationships.



Read more at Suite101: Review of The Red Door by Charles Todd: Inspector Ian Rutledge Returns to Solve Murder in England http://detective-fiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/review_of_the_red_door_by_charles_todd#ixzz0av6Lys...

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

I'm very excited to welcome Charles and Caroline Todd, authors of the marvelous IAN RUTLEDGE books. I've been hooked on this series since the first book came out. I recommend starting with book one and reading them in order, but whatever you do, check out this series!

 

 

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

Hello, Caroline Todd here to wish everyone a Happy New Year. Charles will be coming on later. We want to welcome all our fans--old and new--to January's feature, THE RED DOOR. It has just come out, and we spent the week between Christmas and New Year's signing boxes of books for various bookstores. And we're looking forward to touring in January.

 

We're here to answer any of your questions--about THE RED DOOR or any Rutledge title, or about our new series featuring Bess Crawford.  Or just to talk about writing and books in general. So keep those questions coming--and if we don't answer promptly, it means we're on a flight somewhere to give a talk and won't be back for a day or two. We'll also keep you posted on where we'll be, in case you live close by and want to come in and say hello in person. We'd enjoy seeing you.

 

Okay, your turn.   

 

Cheers!

 

Caroline

 

 

 

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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

Hi Caroline - I'm so excited to meet you! I've been swept away into the world of Ian Rutledge and the omnipresent Hamish for nearly fifteen years now. I loved the series from the first, partly because my grandfather was an Army doctor who served in England and the trenches of France in World War I. His journals first introduced me to that era, and later I discovered the war poets and books by authors such as Vera Brittain. 

 

These books are beyond mysteries -- they are haunting and so evocative, they will stay with anyone who reads them long after you read the last page. I'm not at all surprised they've become so popular, and I'm thrilled to have the author(s) visit with us!

 

I would love to know how the idea for this series came to you -- or did it come to your son first?

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becke_davis
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Re: January Feature: Charles Todd's THE RED DOOR

[ Edited ]

 I haven't read this one yet, but it's on my to-be-read list:

 

A Duty to the Dead (Bess Crawford Series #1) by Charles Todd: Book Cover

 

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/A-Duty-to-the-Dead/Charles-Todd/e/9780061791765/?itm=1&USRI=bess+cr...

 

Synopsis

 

The daughter of a distinguished soldier, Bess Crawford follows in his patriotic footsteps, volunteering to serve her country as a nurse during the Great War. In 1916, she promises Lieutenant Arthur Graham that she will carry his dying request to a brother. When the hospital ship is sunk by a mine and she is sent home to England to recover from her wounds, Bess is determined to fulfill her promise at last.

The New York Times - Marilyn Stasio

Readers who can't get enough of Maisie Dobbs, the intrepid World War I battlefield nurse in Jacqueline Winspear's novels, or Hester Latterly, who saw action in the Crimean War in a series of novels by Anne Perry, are bound to be caught up in the adventures of Bess Crawford, the courageous British army nurse introduced by Charles Todd in A Duty to the Dead. The strong-willed and self-determined daughter of a retired colonel, Bess shows her mettle when the hospital ship she's serving on hits a German mine and goes down off the coast of Greece in the fall of 1916.

More Reviews and Recommendations

Biography

 

Charles Todd is the author of twelve Ian Rutledge mysteries—A Pale HorseA False MirrorA Long ShadowA Cold TreacheryA Fearsome DoubtWatchers of Time,Legacy of the DeadSearch the DarkWings of Fire, and A Test of Wills—and one stand-alone novel. They are a mother-and-son writing team and live in Delaware and North Carolina, respectively.