Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

[ Edited ]

Today we have a special one-day feature with MICHAEL STANLEY! Regulars here may remember that this is really two authors - this is from their website: http://www.detectivekubu.com/

 

Michael Stanley is the writing team of Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip.

 



Both are retired professors who have worked in academia and business. Sears is a mathematician, specializing in geological remote sensing. Trollip is an educational psychologist, specializing in the application of computers to teaching and learning, and a pilot. They were both born in South Africa.

They have been on a number of flying safaris to Botswana and Zimbabwe, where it was always exciting to buzz a dirt airstrip to shoo the elephants off. They have had many adventures on these trips including tracking lions at night, fighting bush fires on the Savuti plains in northern Botswana, being charged by an elephant, and having their plane’s door pop open over the Kalahari, scattering navigation maps over the desert.. These trips have fed their love both for the bush, and for Botswana.

It was on one of these trips that the idea surfaced for a novel set in Botswana.

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

28 Apr 2013 Pioneer Press
Mary Ann Grossmann has an excellent review of DEADLY HARVEST in the Sunday edition of Pioneer Press (4/28).  Noting that it "is the most complex book in this series," she summarized it as a "fascinating police procedural."

24 Apr 2013 Booklist
Booklist commented: 

"Though the cat-and-mouse chase that ensues propels the novel ever forward, Stanley also peppers the tale with richly detailed descriptions of Botswana and the lively lives of its citizens."

24 Apr 2013 New York Journal of Books
The New York Journal of Books said of DEADLY HARVEST:

"Compelling and deceptively written, it’s the perfect summer read."

22 Apr 2013 Recipe book of Kubu`s favorite foods now available in e-book

We have just release an e-book, called A TASTE OF AFRICA - a KUkBUK, which has recipes of many of Kubu's favorite drinks (including a steelworks) and meals (including bobotie). It is available in all e-book formats for $2.99 or the equivalent.  

 

A Taste of Africa  


6 Apr 2013 R. L. Stine comments on DEADLY HARVEST
Renowned mystery writer, R. L. Kline, said this about DEADLY HARVEST: 

"This book took me to a world I didn't want to leave. It kept me reading, it kept me guessing, and it kept me gasping at its many twists and surprises. Highly recommended."

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

[ Edited ]
Interviewer: Today we meet one of Botswana’s top detectives, Assistant Superintendent David Bengu of the Gaborone CID – that’s the Botswana Criminal Investigation Department.  Superintendent Bengu, welcome to our Personality Profile programme. Kubu: Thank you for inviting me. Interviewer: I believe your friends and colleagues call you Kubu.  That means hippopotamus in Setswana.  Where does the nickname come from? Kubu: (Laughs) Well, I’m a very large man, and some people think I’m slightly overweight.  Actually, my wife thinks I’m quite a lot overweight!  And I’m a friendly soul...unless I’m crossed.  Call me Kubu; everyone else does. Interviewer: Well, Kubu, congratulations on solving the Linyanti murder case.  Here in Mochudi, it is very big news!  How did you go about it? Kubu: It’s important to realise that police work is team work.  We have an excellent team at the CID.  My boss – Director Jacob Mabaku – is a brilliant leader.  (Laughs again) Well he might be listening to this interview!  We worked hard on it together – the CID, pathology, and forensics.  As I’m sure you know, most cases are solved through boring hard work and patient sifting of clues.  Nothing escaped us.  Eventually all the pieces fell into place. Interviewer: You grew up right here in Mochudi.  How did you become one of Botswana’s ace detectives? Kubu: I was very lucky.  My parents are wonderful people and made many sacrifices for me to go to school.  Then I managed to get a scholarship to Maru-a-Pula school.  That’s where I learned – among many other things - to love music, singing and, eventually, opera.  My luck held, and when I joined the police they sent me to the University of Botswana.  One of my courses was English, and my lecturer was a wine fundi who started a wine club.  I already liked food – all sorts of food – and found that wine enhances food and the other way around.  That didn’t help my weight a lot!  
After I graduated I went straight into the CID.  Was never on the beat.  I’ve been very lucky, as I told you.
Interviewer: Some people make their own luck, Kubu.  But what attracted you to the career of a detective in the first place? Kubu: It goes back to when I was quite young.  I had a good friend from school in Mochudi – a bushman boy whose name is Khumanego.  One day he took me into the desert, drew a rough circle with a stick, and asked me what I could see.  “Sand, stones, and some dry grass,” I replied.  He pressed me, and I looked harder but saw nothing more.   He said I was blind, and showed me.  In that small circle thrived a teeming world - ants, plants that looked like stones, beetles, and even a fascinating trapdoor spider.  I love those desert plants cunningly disguised as rocks; I have some in my garden in Gaborone now.  After that I vowed that I’d never be blind again.  
Also I’ve always loved jigsaw puzzles.  My father used to buy them and worked on them with me.  We still do one together occasionally.  Solving crimes is about fitting pieces together.  Not necessary physical pieces, but they have to fit together. 
Interviewer: What was it like moving from a small town to the big city? Kubu: I miss the casual friendships and relaxed way we lived.  Gaborone is much busier.  All the minibus taxis driving all over the road!  But I visited Johannesburg in South Africa once and that makes Gaborone look like a village, believe it or not.  I wouldn’t want to live there!  But I met my wonderful wife Joy in Gaborone.  She’ll be listening, too!  We have a nice small house and garden and a fox terrier called Ilia.  I’m happy in the big city now.  But we still spend most Sundays here in Mochudi with my parents.  In the traditional family way. Interviewer: What has been your most difficult case? Kubu: Well, they all have hard parts.  I think the hardest case was when a corpse was found in the desert, half eaten by wild animals, and deliberately mutilated to be unidentifiable.  The case was choked by politics, and powerful people high up.  And one of the country’s biggest companies was involved.  And the stakes kept escalating with one vicious killing after the next.  But that’s another story. Interviewer: Yes, indeed.  We’ve run out of time now, but we must have you back on another occasion!  I’m sure our listeners have found this fascinating and would like to know more.  Thank you very much for joining us this afternoon, Detective Kubu. Kubu: My pleasure!  By the way I missed lunch – well, it was curtailed.  Is there a good place to eat somewhere near here?
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

DEATH OF THE MANTIS is one of the six finalists for the 2012 ANTHONY AWARD for best mystery of 2011 in the category of paperback original.

DEATH OF THE MANTIS winner of the Barry Award for best paperback original of 2011.

DEATH OF THE MANTIS is one of four novels selected for the short list for Best Genre Fiction at the Minnesota Book Awards in 2012.

DEATH OF THE MANTIS is one of five nominees for the Edgar Award from Mystery Writers of America for best paperback original in 2012.

DEATH OF THE MANTIS has been chosen by LIBRARY JOURNAL in the US as one of their top ten new mysteries for 2011.

DEATH OF THE MANTIS was rated number 5 in THE STRAND MAGAZINE'S top 12 mysteries for 2011.

2006 Debut Dagger Finalist

MYSTERY NEWS and DEADLY PLEASURES announced today that A CARRION DEATH has been nominated for a 2008 Barry Award in the Best First Novel Category.

A Carrion Death has been nominated for the Mystery Readers Journal's Macavity award for Best First Novel.

A Carrion Death is finalist in the fiction genre of the 2008 Minnesota Book Awards.

A Carrion Death is a finalist for the Best First Novel of 2008 in the Critics Awards of Strand Magazine.
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

An Issue of Women and Money

Kubu has to investigate a murder at a neighborhood bar. At first it seems to be a case of a drunken brawl but some aspects don't add up.  And when it turns out the victim has just had a big win at the casino, Kubu knows that there's more to it than meets the eye... 

An Issue of Women and Money appears in Once Upon A Crime - an anthology of murder, mayhem and suspense, edited by Gary Bush & Chris Everheart and published by Nodin Press. ISBN 978 1 932472 71 4 

 

Once Upon a Crime  

If you would like to read the story, click on the title above.


The Empty Chair by Graham Greene and...
The Empty Chair is a recently discovered unfinished novella by Graham Greene.  Set in an English country house where a group of guests are spending a few days with Lady Alice Perriham, one morning a guest does not appear for breakfast and is discovered murdered. At first it seems straightforward, but the case becomes more and more complicated. Inspector Maybury - an intriguing stamp-collecting detective - follows the trail.  But it's the aging actor - Sir John Collis - who unravels the mystery.

The Strand Magazine published the novella and ran a competition for the best ending to the story.  Our offering was chosen and will appear in the Spring 2011 edition.

The Haunting
The Haunting is a short story about a witchdoctor in South Africa who gets mixed up in a murder.  And finds a strange way of solving it.

It appeared in the June-Sept. 2010 issue of The Strand Magazine.
 
If you would like to read the story, click on the title above.

Neighbours by Michael Stanley
Two neighbours in a small rural village in Botswana are always feuding.  Barking dogs, tresspassing goats, whatever.  When one dies a sudden and mysterious death, the villagers suspect witchcraft and threaten to take the law into their own hands. Kubu doesn't have long to solve the case.

Neighbours appears in an anthology of short stories by South African crime writers entitled Bad Company, edited by Joanne Hichens and published by Pan MacMillan.  ISBN 978 1 770 10087 9.

If you would like to read the story, click on the title above.
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

There's a very interesting article here:

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jun/30/michael-stanley-african-crime

 

Michael Stanley's top 10 African crime novels

 

The African crime writing duo pick the best books in their field, from established greats Agatha Christie and John Le Carré to newer names on the scene such as Kwei Quartey and Deon Meyer

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

Check this out, too!

 

http://jsydneyjones.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/botswana-mysteries-the-works-of-michael-stanley/

 

Scene of the Crime

The blog of author J. Sydney Jones, focusing on mysteries and thrillers with spirit of place

 

Botswana Mysteries: The Works of Michael Stanley

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

About...

Michael Sears was born in Johannesburg, and grew up in Cape Town and Nairobi, Kenya. In the worst of the apartheid era, his family emigrated to Australia, where he completed a doctorate in dynamical systems. But Africa drew him back in 1972, and he accepted a position at the university in Johannesburg where he specialized in applications of mathematics in a variety of areas including image analysis and ecological modeling. This led to many fascinating projects, one of which involved radio-tracking hunting lions through the Botswana night. Another was a system model for the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park.

Michael Sears
Photography by Aron Frankental

While Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University, he focused on working with black students and encouraging them into science careers. This period also enabled him to make contacts with the historically black Southern African universities. 

In 1997 he accepted a position managing remote sensing at Anglo American, a major international mining house. Its associate – the diamond giant De Beers – has extensive interests in Botswana through the Debswana joint venture with the government. The mining and exploration threads in the book draw on experiences gained in this context.

While Michael Sears has traveled widely in Southern and Central Africa, Botswana, with its magnificent conservation areas, dramatic scenery, and varied peoples, has always been a special favorite of his. Although he still lives in Johannesburg, his mind is often in the African Bush, and the rest of him follows as often as possible. He has long-held an ambition to capture the flavor of the country on the canvass of a novel. And now, along with coauthor Trollip, Sears has done just that in A CARRION DEATH: A DETECTIVE KUBU MYSTERY, his first work of fiction.

 

Stanley Trollip was born in Johannesburg where he was schooled from childhood to his university degree in Statistics. His undergraduate time was checkered, taking twice as long as usual, mainly due to participation in a variety of sports (cricket, rugby, and field hockey), editing the student newspaper, and involvement in the anti-apartheid movement. In 1971, he attended the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign where he received a PhD in Educational Psychology, with an emphasis on how computers could facilitate teaching and learning. Since 1976 he has been a professor or a consultant and was until recently Director of Learning Strategies at Capella University, an on-line University. These studies lead to a book project; Trollip co-authored a very successful textbook: Multimedia for Learning: Methods and Development (Allyn and Bacon).

Trollip, who holds a variety of pilot’s licenses, lectures frequently on the topic of aviation safety. He co-authored one book on the subject, Human Factors for General Aviation (Jeppesen) and was principal author on several others for Transportation Canada, all published without attribution. 

 

 

Stanley Trollip
Photography by Aron Frankental

With coauthor Michael Sears, Trollip has enjoyed flying safaris to Botswana and Zimbabwe. They have had many adventures together, including tracking lions at night, fighting bush fires on the Savuti plains in northern Botswana, being charged by an elephant, and having their plane’s door pop open over the Kalahari, scattering their navigation maps over the desert. These wonderful times have fed his love for the bush, as well as for Botswana. 

Stanley Trollip, still an active small-plane pilot and now nearly a full-time writer, is currently learning to paraglide. He divides his time between South Africa and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Trollip is currently busily at work with Sears on their second Detective Kubu novel.

Awards and Special Recognition...

A CARRION DEATH
Barnes & Noble “Discover Great New Writers” Selection

DEATH OF THE MANTIS
BARRY Award for best 2012 paperback original 
Finalist for 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2011, in the BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL category.
Shortlisted for BARRY Award in the best paperback original 
Minnesota Book Awards genre fiction 
One of top ten mysteries selection of 2011 by Library Journal
One of top 12 mysteries selection of 2011 by Strand Magazine
 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

First of all, I want to apologize to Michael and Stanley for posting this one-day feature a couple days late. They visited with us awhile back, as some of you might recall:

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Mystery/Please-Welcome-LEIGHTON-GAGE-amp-HIS-INTERNATIONAL-CR...

 

Please welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!!

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

[ Edited ]

Stanley Trollip

Stanley Trollip

I was born in Johannesburg where I did all my schooling up to and including an undergraduate degree (in Statistics). My undergraduate time was checkered, taking twice as long as usual, mainly due to participation in a variety of sports (cricket, rugby, and field hockey) and involvement in the anti-apartheid movement. In 1970, I went to the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign where I received a PhD in Educational Psychology. For the most part, I was always a professor with an interest in how computers can facilitate teaching and learning. I’ve co-authored three editions of a widely used book, Multimedia for Learning: Methods and Development (Allyn and Bacon).

Before retiring in 2003, I was as Director of Learning Strategies at Capella University – which delivers courses entirely through the World Wide Web. When I joined, Capella had about 50 learners. When I left seven years later, it had over 8,000. Today it is about 18,000.

I hold a variety of pilot’s licenses and have a strong interest in aviation safety. I lecture frequently on the topic; have co-authored one book on the subject published by Jeppesen Sandersen (Human Factors for General Aviation). I am still an active small-plane pilot and am currently learning to paraglide.

Michael and I have been on a number of flying safaris to Botswana and Zimbabwe. It is always exciting to buzz a dirt airstrip to shoo the elephants off. We have had many adventures on these trips including tracking lions at night, fighting bush fires on the Savuti plains in northern Botswana, being charged by an elephant, and having our plane’s door pop open over the Kalahari, scattering our navigation maps over the desert.. These have been wonderful times which have fed my love both for the bush, as well as for Botswana.

In my leisure, I golf, bike, and hike. On dark and stormy nights I play with my collection of stamps from German South West Africa/South West Africa/Namibia.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

[ Edited ]

michael Sears

Michael Sears

I was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, and grew up in Cape Town and Nairobi, Kenya. In the worst of the apartheid era, my family emigrated to Australia, where I studied mathematics. But Africa drew me back and I accepted a position at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg where I specialized in applications of mathematics in a variety of areas including image analysis and ecological modeling. One of the more adventurous projects involved radio-tracking hunting lions through the Botswana night. Another was a system model for the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park.

I have traveled widely in Southern and Central Africa. Botswana has always been a special favorite with its magnificent conservation areas, dramatic scenery, and varied peoples. A long-held ambition was to capture the flavor of the country as the canvass of a novel.

From 1997 until my retirement at the end of 2007, I managed remote sensing at Anglo American, a major international mining house. Its associate – the diamond giant De Beers – has extensive interests in Botswana through the Debswana joint venture with the government. The mining and exploration threads in the book draw on experiences in this context.

I enjoy research, project work, and writing most when I’m working with other people. I’ve worked with researchers in several countries on varied projects, managed teams in the academic and business arenas, and co-authored two novels. All these things can be, and generally are, done by oneself. But it’s a lonely business.

Although I still live in Johannesburg, my mind is often in the African bush, and the rest of me follows as often as possible. Stan and I share a bungalow in a private game reserve close enough for a long weekend. Birds are watched, wine is drunk, and plots develop.

My wife, Annette, and step-daughter, Jacky, have provided great encouragement. The family also includes two corgis, who, although intelligent, are not avid readers of crime fiction.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,237
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

Welcome, Michael and Stanley. I've not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet, but I'm certainly adding them to my TBR pile.

OK, one question:

 What's the greatest challenge of co-writing a book?

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!


Fricka wrote:

Welcome, Michael and Stanley. I've not had the pleasure of reading one of your books yet, but I'm certainly adding them to my TBR pile.

OK, one question:

 What's the greatest challenge of co-writing a book?


Good question! I'll add to that - do you each have an assigned role when you write? (One plots, for example?)

Author
Stanley_Trollip
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

Hi Fricka:

 

I think the biggest challenge is to trust the other half!  Our writing styles are quite similar, and we have similar senses of humour, etc., so those parts are relatively easy.  However, when some writing that you are particularly fond of is red-inked by the other, it is sometimes hard to stomach.  However, you just have to trust that he is right.  We've learned to do that.

 

Actually almost every time that one of us writes something he thinks is special, the other nixes it.  This is probably because when you think something is special, you have lost the perspective of the whole book.  Then the writer starts showing through, not the story.

 

Stanley

Author
Stanley_Trollip
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!

In terms of roles, we both do everything, from plotting, to writing, to editing, to marketing.  At any time during the writing process, we talk at length about where we need to go, and one of us takes responsibility for it.  The other often is writing another piece of the book.  When one is finished with what he is writing, he sends it to the other who reviews, criticizes, and edits, and sends it back.  The piece bounces back and forth many times - sometimes up to 20 times.  Eventually, the piece is written by Michael Stanley, not Michael, nor Stanley.

 

Stanley

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!


Stanley_Trollip wrote:

In terms of roles, we both do everything, from plotting, to writing, to editing, to marketing.  At any time during the writing process, we talk at length about where we need to go, and one of us takes responsibility for it.  The other often is writing another piece of the book.  When one is finished with what he is writing, he sends it to the other who reviews, criticizes, and edits, and sends it back.  The piece bounces back and forth many times - sometimes up to 20 times.  Eventually, the piece is written by Michael Stanley, not Michael, nor Stanley.

 

Stanley


 

Hurray! I'm so glad you were able to sign in. There have been problems with the site today. It looks like it's working again, thank goodness!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: One-Day Feature - Please Welcome MICHAEL STANLEY!


Stanley_Trollip wrote:

In terms of roles, we both do everything, from plotting, to writing, to editing, to marketing.  At any time during the writing process, we talk at length about where we need to go, and one of us takes responsibility for it.  The other often is writing another piece of the book.  When one is finished with what he is writing, he sends it to the other who reviews, criticizes, and edits, and sends it back.  The piece bounces back and forth many times - sometimes up to 20 times.  Eventually, the piece is written by Michael Stanley, not Michael, nor Stanley.

 

Stanley


Were you friends before you started writing together? How did your joint authorship come about?