Reply
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Our Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

[ Edited ]

This is practically a sacrilege, but I'll admit it - I didn't used to like Sherlock Holmes much. I thought he was a stick-in-the-mud. I read all the stories but, unlike Miss Marple and even Hercule Poirot, I rarely felt the urge to go back a re-read the Holmes stories.

 

And then I met Mary Russell. Laurie R. King's creation, Mary Russell, made me look at Sherlock Holmes with new eyes. I highly recommend her books!

 

 

The Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes books aren't all Laurie writes. Read on for a full list of her books, including her latest, THE BONES OF PARIS.

 

The Bones of Paris  

 

I want to thank Laurie in advance for taking the time to visit with us this week.

 

Laurie's website is here: http://www.laurierking.com/

 

Welcome to the official site of all things Laurie R. King. We've put together a virtual labyrinth of articles and art here, fun seasoned with a dash of scholarship. Enjoy!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

From Laurie's website:

 

About the Author

See below for:

Biography
Publisher & Publicist Information
Links & Downloads
Photos

grave_talent_small

Biography

Laurie R. King is a third generation Northern Californian who has lived most of her life in the San Francisco Bay area. Her background is as mixed as any writer’s, from degrees in theology and managing a coffee store to raising children, vegetables, and the occasional building.

King’s writing reflects her background—it is no accident that characters in her books spend time in the Bay Area and England (King’s other home) and are interested in theology, architecture, and travel (Her longautobiography goes into this relationship in detail.)

King started writing in 1987 when her second child entered school, and had her first novel published in 1993. Since A Grave Talent, she has averaged a book a year, winning prizes that range from Agatha (a nomination) to Wolfe (Nero, for A Monstrous Regiment of Women.) The characters of A Grave Talent, centering around inspector Kate Martinelli of the San Francisco Police Department, have appeared in five novels to date.

cover-beekeeperIn 1994, The Beekeeper’s Apprentice was published, featuring young Mary Russell who becomes an apprentice, then partner of Sherlock Holmes in early 20th century England. Books in that series appear regularly, taking the duo and their cohorts on into the Twenties and around the world, winning admiration far and wide. These historical novels allow King to explore all sorts of ideas: the roots of conflict in the Middle East and Afghanistan; feminism and early Christianity; patriotism and individual responsibility, while also having a rousing good time with revisiting the scenes of The Hound of the Baskervilles and Kim, setting a pair of Bedouin nomads down in a grand country house in England, and forging an unlikely relationship between two remarkably similar individuals who happen to be separated by age, sex, and background.

King also writes the occasional stand-alone novel—or, more or less stand-alone. Two of the books (Folly and Keeping Watch) share characters, Califia’s Daughters (written under the pseudonym Leigh Richards) may some day take its place within a trilogy, and Touchstone is being considered as the basis for a future series.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Click here to read Laurie's in-depth autobiography: http://www.laurierking.com/the-author/about/autobiography

 

You can view Laurie's full event schedule here: http://www.laurierking.com/events/wheres-laurie

 

These are Laurie's online links:

 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/mary_russell

 

She's on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/laurie.king?ref=profile

 

And here: https://www.facebook.com/laurierking?ref=ts

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

The Bones of Paris  

 

Overview

 

New York Times bestselling author Laurie R. King, beloved for her acclaimed Mary Russell/Sherlock Holmes series, consistently writes richly detailed and thoroughly suspenseful novels that bring a distant time and place to brilliant life. Now, in this thrilling new book, King leads readers into the vibrant and sensual Paris of the Jazz Age—and reveals the darkest secrets of its denizens.
 
Paris, France: September 1929. For Harris Stuyvesant, the assignment is a private investigator’s dream—he’s getting paid to troll the cafés and bars of Montparnasse, looking for a pretty young woman. The American agent has a healthy appreciation for la vie de bohème,despite having worked for years at the U.S. Bureau of Investigation. The missing person in question is Philippa Crosby, a twenty-two year old from Boston who has been living in Paris, modeling and acting. Her family became alarmed when she stopped all communications, and Stuyvesant agreed to track her down. He wholly expects to find her in the arms of some up-and-coming artist, perhaps experimenting with the decadent lifestyle that is suddenly available on every rue and boulevard.
 
As Stuyvesant follows Philippa’s trail through the expatriate community of artists and writers, he finds that she is known to many of its famous—and infamous—inhabitants, from Shakespeare and Company’s Sylvia Beach to Ernest Hemingway to the Surrealist photographer Man Ray. But when the evidence leads Stuyvesant to the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol in Montmartre, his investigation takes a sharp, disturbing turn. At the Grand-Guignol, murder, insanity, and sexual perversion are all staged to shocking, brutal effect: depravity as art, savage human nature on stage.
 
Soon it becomes clear that one missing girl is a drop in the bucket. Here, amid the glittering lights of the cabarets, hides a monster whose artistic coup de grâce is to be rendered in blood. And Stuyvesant will have to descend into the darkest depths of perversion to find a killer . . . sifting through The Bones of Paris.
 
The award-winning novels of Laurie R. King are . . .
 
“Delightful and creative.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Intricate clockworks, wheels within wheels.”—Booklist (starred review)
 
“Audacious.”—Los Angeles Times
 
“Rousing . . . riveting . . . suspenseful.”—Chicago Sun-Times
 
“Imaginative and subtle.”—The Seattle Times
 
“Impossible to put down.”—Romantic Times
 
“Beguiling . . . tantalizing.”—The Boston Globe

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

[ Edited ]

I'm having trouble getting a related to video to post. You can click this link to see it:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aV1b-YKGtM&feature=c4-overview&list=UU_EApjUfQiyZY2M5Vg11LBA

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

There's a link on Laurie's website to Stuveysant's Paris: https://www.google.com/maps/ms?msid=217948420165699131152.0004e2bbfd8e9a9167c9c&msa=0

 

Laurie's publisher has given permission to share this excerpt, which is PART of what you can find on her website here: http://www.laurierking.com/books/book-excerpts/bones-of-paris

 

Excerpt One:
PREFACE

Wednesday & Thursday
September 18 & 19, 1929

THE ENVELOPE REACHED Bennett Grey early Wednesday afternoon. His neighbor Robbie splashed up the muddy drive with it, beaming with eagerness—post was rare here at the farthest reaches of Cornwall, and an oversized, airmailed envelope from Paris was a prize. But Wednesday had been a bad day already, with a headache beating at Grey’s skull and shadows dancing at the corners of his eyes. He let his gaze slide over the envelope’s surface, and told the lad to leave it on the kitchen table.

There it lay, growling like an angry cat whenever he set foot in the kitchen, while the rain streaked the windows and the day faded to night.

He took a cold supper in the sitting room. He abandoned the dishes in the sink. He called himself a coward and took himself to bed, where he spent the next seven hours feeling the world scrape across his raw nerves.

The raindrops grew smaller, then slowed. As the sky cleared, the full moon pressed against the house, cool light whispering a path along the threads of the bedroom carpet. On the road, the faint sound of farmer Evans’ motor came, grew, receded: the hesitant foot on the pedals suggested one drink too many. The odor and feel of his fresh sheets testified to Mrs. Trevalian’s distraction on laundry day: the residue came from one rinse rather than two. Out in the yard, a dog-fox hunted: Bennett heard the dig of the big creature’s claws into gritty soil, the thump of its landing, the pale squeak of a mouse’s death. Waves chewed at the cliffs; air currents climbed and slid down the hills; the grandfather clock in the front room tick, ticked the world towards morning. One of its gears had a flaw that his bones felt whenever the tooth worked its way around. The uneven wear would lead to trouble in an- other ten or fifteen years—but by then, please God, it would be someone else’s problem.

If the envelope had been from Sarah, he’d have forced himself to open the thing, despite the weather, the shadows, and the miasma of dread that clung to the paper like old grease. But it was not Sarah’s writing. The letter came from Harris Stuyvesant, a man whose motives Grey had reason to distrust. A man who stirred a whirlwind of emotions: guilt and hate, pity and pain, friendship and the deep ache of unacknowledged responsibilities. A man whose hand had been so tense when printing the address, the nib had caught twice in the fibers.

If that wasn’t sufficient warning, the flap had been doubly sealed, its glue reinforced with paper tape. Fear alone would do that, fear that a mere lick of the tongue was not enough to keep the contents from escaping.

The sky was still dark when Bennett Grey left his bed. He dressed, and walked through moonlight to the promontory overlooking the Channel. The slab of stone he climbed onto was the edge of the world, Britain’s final bit of land. The infinitesimal shift beneath his boots told him that, sometime in the next century, an added weight such as his would tip the thing into the sea. In the meantime, the rock provided a viewpoint, and a temptation: just lean forward…

The eastern horizon grew lighter. The waves below his dangling boot-heels called their Siren song: You always have a choice. He could simply bend over and let the sky claim him, let it pull at his garments and cushion him with airy hands for a few moments, then deliver him safely to the rocks, sixty feet below.

There was always a choice.

The sun breached the horizon, flaring the world into a brilliance that thinned, faded, retreated. When the mist had cleared from the water below, Bennett Grey got to his feet and looked straight down at the seething waves.

“Not today, friends.”

Back in his kitchen, the sun poured through the windows, beating the dark gremlins into the corners of the room. Still, Grey stirred the fire into life before approaching the table.

He stood in the sunlight with the envelope in one hand and his knife in the other; the blade whispered through the manila paper. Grey slid the contents onto the table. When he lifted the top sheet, a fleeting look downward made him grateful for the reinforcing tape: had Robbie’s curiosity got the better of him, the poor lad would have had nightmares for weeks.

Stuyvesant’s American script on the cheap French stationery was as tense as his printing on the envelope:

September 16
Hotel Benoit Rue de Colle, Paris

Bennett,
Sorry to disturb you, but I need to know if these can be real, and I don’t know who else to ask. I’m hoping you tell me they were staged.

I saw Sarah the other night, she’s looking well.

Harris

Grey reread that last sentence: flat, noncommittal, and with a hesitation on the I. There was something Harris was not telling him. Something troubling the man.

Grey shook his head at the ill-fated relationship between his sister and his friend, then rested the needle-sharp point of his knife on the topmost photograph to push it away. He repeated the motion three times, moving each picture across his kitchen table with the point of the knife. Four pieced-together images seared onto his mind and soul: the widened eyes; the pull of muscle; the strain in the neck; the texture of the skin. He studied all four, although a glimpse of any one of them would have been enough, for a man with his abilities.

When he had looked, he slid the envelope under the pictures and thrust everything into the stove. He wiped the knife on his trouser-leg, waiting for the flames to catch. He washed his hands with soap. He scrubbed the table and used the steel poker to reduce the ashes to dust.

And then he went to pack a bag. The pictures were not staged. The terror was real.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Please welcome LAURIE R. KING!

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,011
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Hi, Laurie, I have read some of the Mary Russell/ Sherlock Holmes books but never ventured to read your other books. I will try these out soon. Have a great week here.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Hi Laurie - I'm very excited to read THE BONES OF PARIS - I love the setting and the era the story is set in. 

 

What are you working on now? Another stand-alone, or are you back to Mary Russell?

 

I've posted a link to your coming events, but do you know if you'll be doing any Barnes & Noble book signings in the coming months?

 

Thank you!

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Welcome, Laurie.

I absolutely adore the Mary Russell series. It's hard to pick out just one favorite, so I will say that there's a close tie between A Monstrous Regiment of Women and Locked Rooms.

Could you share with us where you idea came from, to give Sherlock Holmes a young apprentice, who was female, Jewish, and American?

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

The Beekeeper's Apprentice (Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes Series #1)  

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,679
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Laurie has been TRYING to join us but, alas, she is being plagued by trolls and gnomes. Yes, it's the Horrible Glitch again! If she's unable to sign in, we're going back to the old faithful way around it - she'll email her responses to me and I'll post them on her behalf. Not ideal, but it's all I can come up with...

Contributor
LaurieRKingLRK
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-11-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

I like to alternate what I write, to keep my mind fresh and my interest on the characters.  For various reasons I've done four Russells in a row, but I think fromnow on I'll probably do one or two and then something else: a Styvesant & Grey, or a Martinelli, or...

I hope you find something to enjoy in them.

Laurie

Contributor
LaurieRKingLRK
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-11-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

The Twenties in Paris is a whole lot of fun, isn't it? When I'm finished my Bones of Paris tour in a couple of weeks, I'll get back to work on a new Russell, set for publication in early 2015.  It will be divided between their 1924 adventures in Japan and a 1925 puzzle in Oxford.

I don't see any B&N events on the current schecule, however, I'm seeing a number of B&Ns as I do drop in signings throughout the Bay Area--San Jose yesterday, Walnut Creek today. My motto: leave no book unsigned!

Contributor
LaurieRKingLRK
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-11-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Hi Fricka, thanks for the kind words.  Russell began with a reflection that I, the mother of two (at the time) young children, did daily what The Great Detective got wondering applause for, but rather than having Watson exclaim, "How do you DO it, Holmes?" I had kids wondering how I knew they'd hit the cookie jar before dinner. What would "women's intuition" look like if we took it seriously? Hence a young, female, feminist Sherlock Holmes--and why not put her next to the original, by way of contrast?

In fact, after I wrote Touchstone I realized I'd done something similar there, with physical war trauma turning a young soldier into a person so sensitive, he performed Holmesian acts of perception. That's Bennett Grey, who appears in The Bones of Paris as well.

Unfortunately, I couldn't make a person in his situation a woman...

Contributor
LaurieRKingLRK
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-11-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Sorry, all, I thought the replies might appear with their initial messages, so this will mean a certain amount of mental sorting out.  In the future I'll put the questioner's name at the beginning of my reply.


Laurie