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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!


LaurieRKingLRK wrote:

I like to alternate what I write, to keep my mind fresh and my interest on the characters.  For various reasons I've done four Russells in a row, but I think fromnow on I'll probably do one or two and then something else: a Styvesant & Grey, or a Martinelli, or...

I hope you find something to enjoy in them.

Laurie


What are the pluses and drawbacks of writing a long-running series? Is it difficult to come up with new plot ideas?

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!


LaurieRKingLRK wrote:

The Twenties in Paris is a whole lot of fun, isn't it? When I'm finished my Bones of Paris tour in a couple of weeks, I'll get back to work on a new Russell, set for publication in early 2015.  It will be divided between their 1924 adventures in Japan and a 1925 puzzle in Oxford.

I don't see any B&N events on the current schecule, however, I'm seeing a number of B&Ns as I do drop in signings throughout the Bay Area--San Jose yesterday, Walnut Creek today. My motto: leave no book unsigned!


I'm halfway across the United States - will you be in Chicago at all during your book tour?

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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!


LaurieRKingLRK wrote:

Hi Fricka, thanks for the kind words.  Russell began with a reflection that I, the mother of two (at the time) young children, did daily what The Great Detective got wondering applause for, but rather than having Watson exclaim, "How do you DO it, Holmes?" I had kids wondering how I knew they'd hit the cookie jar before dinner. What would "women's intuition" look like if we took it seriously? Hence a young, female, feminist Sherlock Holmes--and why not put her next to the original, by way of contrast?

In fact, after I wrote Touchstone I realized I'd done something similar there, with physical war trauma turning a young soldier into a person so sensitive, he performed Holmesian acts of perception. That's Bennett Grey, who appears in The Bones of Paris as well.

Unfortunately, I couldn't make a person in his situation a woman...


I LOVE this description! I wonder if there are more women fans of Mary Russell than men. I was so excited when I read the first Mary Russell book. Now I understand why the story resonated with me! :-)

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

 

 

Laurie - Thank you so much for persevering when you ran into the Notorious Glitch! I'm so glad you were able to sign in!

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Laurie - I know you're really busy this week, but if you have time at some point, I'd love to hear your "call" story! I'm fascinated with the stories authors tell about getting the call that they'd sold their first book!

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Laurie - With all the interest in Sherlock Holmes since the two TV series, the movies, etc., I wondered if any of the Mary Russell books have been optioned for TV or movies?

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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

What are the pluses and drawbacks of writing a long-running series? Is it difficult to come up with new plot ideas?

 

New ideas might be more difficult to dredge up if I limited the series to one place, but since the characters are free to travel, doors are flung wide.  This is no less true of the new Stuyvesant & Grey series than with Russell & Holmes--the first, Touchstone, was in 1926 London, and The Bones of Paris is (yes) in France, in 1929. With the world to draw from, I don't think I'll run out of plot ideas.

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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

I'd love to hear your "call" story! I'm fascinated with the stories authors tell about getting the call that they'd sold their first book!

 

It was from my agent, Linda Allen, in late 1991. We'd had both The Beekeeper's Apprentice and A Grave Talent circulating for a couple of years before the late, great Ruth Cavin picked up A Grave Talent, and a career was born.  If Northern California thought there was a widespread sonic boom that day, no, it was just me shouting as soon as I put down the phone.

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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

 I wondered if any of the Mary Russell books have been optioned for TV or movies?

 

Not yet, although there are ongoing conversations.  Part of the problem is the decision of whether to maintain the books' settings, which would involve a lot of expensive foreign filming, or whether to limit the scope of the books to one or two places.  

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!


LaurieRKingLRK wrote:

I'd love to hear your "call" story! I'm fascinated with the stories authors tell about getting the call that they'd sold their first book!

 

It was from my agent, Linda Allen, in late 1991. We'd had both The Beekeeper's Apprentice and A Grave Talent circulating for a couple of years before the late, great Ruth Cavin picked up A Grave Talent, and a career was born.  If Northern California thought there was a widespread sonic boom that day, no, it was just me shouting as soon as I put down the phone.


LOL! I assumed THE BEEKEEPER'S APPRENTICE sold first - I'm intrigued that it was A GRAVE TALENT. 

 

A Grave Talent  

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!


LaurieRKingLRK wrote:

 I wondered if any of the Mary Russell books have been optioned for TV or movies?

 

Not yet, although there are ongoing conversations.  Part of the problem is the decision of whether to maintain the books' settings, which would involve a lot of expensive foreign filming, or whether to limit the scope of the books to one or two places.  


Hmm. I can understand the cost-consciousness, but I think it would be cool if they kept the original settings!

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becke_davis
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Re: Our Special Featured Author this week is LAURIE R. KING!

Laurie - Thank you soooo much for taking the time to visit with us this week, especially after the glitch problems.