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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!


Emily-Arsenault wrote:

Becke--

 

1) Sight and smell. I didn't realize I describe smell so often until a person interviewing me on the radio recently read me several smell-description passages from my book, and asked me to explain why I wrote that way. I think smell is used particularly often in my second book because the narrator is spending so much time revisiting places she hasn't been to since her childhood. And smell is, of course, very evocative of memories.

 

I agree - sometimes just a whiff of something can send you back in time.

 

2) Since I only have two published books, it is hard to pick a favorite. I think Broken Teaglass is funnier, but I think In Search of the Rose Notes is more suspenseful and perhaps a little more disciplined, in terms of how I went about the writing. They each have their strengths. They are very different books. The second is much darker than the first.

 

I've read IN SEARCH OF THE ROSE NOTES and that was definitely suspenseful. I just added your first book to my to-be-read pile.

 

3) I watch some mystery TV shows and movies. Lately my husband and I have been trying the PBS Foyle's War series on Netflix. We enjoy the characters.

 

I LOVE Foyle's War! All the actors are great, but Michael Kitchen is outstanding.

 

4) That is a hard question. I have to admit I don't give this a great deal of thought. I will have to think this one and come back with some names later.

 

5) Funny you should ask that! Just a few days ago I deactivated my personal Facebook account because I felt it was looking at it too often when I should be writing. Lately, when I really should be writing, I've also been watching a lot of the Porter Wagoner Show and other 60s and 70s country music shows on Youtube. I know I can call a certain amount of this "research," but I think I exceeded the limit on that excuse many videos ago.

 

It's still research, it's just FUN research! ;-)


 

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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!

I love to hear "call" stories - would you tell us about when you received the call that you'd sold your first book?

Author
Emily-Arsenault
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎08-18-2011
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!

Sure! It was a very memorable time because my mother-in-law was visiting us for a couple of weeks (!) in our tiny apartment in New Haven, CT. I recall wondering that morning--the first day she was with us-- how we were ever going to get through such a long visit in such close quarters.

 

Mid-morning on the first day of her visit (it was a Monday, and I had Mondays off at the time), my agent sent me a cryptic e-mail from an editor who'd just read the book the night before. She wanted to know what I was working on next. I spent the whole day trying to put together a single paragraph about my next project (which I'd barely begun). I sent it in the late afternoon.(My mother-in-law, who is also a writer, was very understanding about my becoming completely antisocial for the rest of the day.)

 

By around five or six in the evening, my agent called with the editor's offer. It all happened very fast and it was quite surreal. (I had just gotten the agent about a month before--at that point, I was still just thrilled to have an agent, and wasn't expecting a sale soon or perhaps ever.) My husband and mother-in-law and I all went out for Indian food and had champagne and had a grand time. I didn't sleep at all that night ("Ohmigod, all that stuff I wrote in that book is going to be PUBLISHED? People are going to READ it?') and went to work the next day still in complete shock. I was happy, but I was also really apprehensive. I don't think I ever really thought I'd get a book deal, so it was the first time I really thought about what having the book "out there" would really mean.

 

The "deal" wasn't officially made till the following Monday, because in the meantime my agent had to allow the other editors who had the manuscript to make an offer. One of them did. By Friday the two editors were bidding on it. By the following Monday, I'd decided to go with the first editor, who'd made the early offer--though it was a difficult decision, as I liked them both and the offers were similar.

 

I remember that week as a blur of phone calls, e-mails, shock, happiness, confusion, and many meals kindly cooked by my mother-in-law because I was in too much of a daze to be much of a hostess.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!


Emily-Arsenault wrote:

Sure! It was a very memorable time because my mother-in-law was visiting us for a couple of weeks (!) in our tiny apartment in New Haven, CT. I recall wondering that morning--the first day she was with us-- how we were ever going to get through such a long visit in such close quarters.

 

Mid-morning on the first day of her visit (it was a Monday, and I had Mondays off at the time), my agent sent me a cryptic e-mail from an editor who'd just read the book the night before. She wanted to know what I was working on next. I spent the whole day trying to put together a single paragraph about my next project (which I'd barely begun). I sent it in the late afternoon.(My mother-in-law, who is also a writer, was very understanding about my becoming completely antisocial for the rest of the day.)

 

By around five or six in the evening, my agent called with the editor's offer. It all happened very fast and it was quite surreal. (I had just gotten the agent about a month before--at that point, I was still just thrilled to have an agent, and wasn't expecting a sale soon or perhaps ever.) My husband and mother-in-law and I all went out for Indian food and had champagne and had a grand time. I didn't sleep at all that night ("Ohmigod, all that stuff I wrote in that book is going to be PUBLISHED? People are going to READ it?') and went to work the next day still in complete shock. I was happy, but I was also really apprehensive. I don't think I ever really thought I'd get a book deal, so it was the first time I really thought about what having the book "out there" would really mean.

 

The "deal" wasn't officially made till the following Monday, because in the meantime my agent had to allow the other editors who had the manuscript to make an offer. One of them did. By Friday the two editors were bidding on it. By the following Monday, I'd decided to go with the first editor, who'd made the early offer--though it was a difficult decision, as I liked them both and the offers were similar.

 

I remember that week as a blur of phone calls, e-mails, shock, happiness, confusion, and many meals kindly cooked by my mother-in-law because I was in too much of a daze to be much of a hostess.


*sigh* I LOVE stories like this! 

 

How has your life changed since then? What have you found surprising about being a published author? Is it everything you hoped it would be?

Inspired Contributor
leisure_reader
Posts: 236
Registered: ‎02-04-2010
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!

Welcome Emily,

 

So does working for Webster make you a wordsmith?  Bost of you books look quite interesting to me and will probably give one or both a try. 

 

J

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
- Eleanor Roosevelt

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Author EMILY ARSENAULT!

Emily - Thank you so much for visiting with us today! I hope you'll come back again soon, especially when you have more details about your next book!