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becke_davis
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author LESLIE BUDEWITZ!


becke_davis wrote:

Hi Leslie! To get started, tell us something about your writing process. Do you plot your books out in advance or do you write generically? What book are you working on now? Can you tell us anything about it or is it too soon to say?


Here's Leslie's reply:

 

Oh, I’m an outliner, no question. To tell you the truth, I hate the arguments writers sometimes get into over outlining vs. “pantsing” (writing by the seat of the pants) or as it’s now being called, writing organically. I think the more you know about your characters in advance, the easier it is to follow them around and to know what’s going to work for the story or not. Now, that’s not to say surprises don’t happen. Readers of Death al Dente, I had no idea Dean aka Elvis and Linda had twin daughters until they showed up, but can you imagine the story without them? Nor did I know what role Adam would have or how important Landon would be to understanding Erin and her family.

 

Village #2 takes place later in the summer, during the annual Summer Faire Arts and Food Festival, with its signature event, a steak grill-off. Naturally, the working title is Crime Rib. My hunny is an excellent grill master, and we feature his filet with huckleberry-morel sauce.

 

I’m currently writing the first book in my Seattle Spice Shop Mysteries, working title Spiced to Death. Pepper Reece, owner of a spice shop in Seattle’s Pike Place Market, investigates when she finds a homeless man new to the neighborhood dead in her doorway. As a college student and a young lawyer in Seattle, I spent many happy hours in the Market, and am delighted to be taking readers there on the page. It is confusing, talking about Village #1 with readers, working on Village #2 with my editor, and writing Spice #1 – but it’s a great problem to have!”

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author LESLIE BUDEWITZ!


becke_davis wrote:

becke_davis wrote:

Hi Leslie! To get started, tell us something about your writing process. Do you plot your books out in advance or do you write generically? What book are you working on now? Can you tell us anything about it or is it too soon to say?


Here's Leslie's reply:

 

Oh, I’m an outliner, no question. To tell you the truth, I hate the arguments writers sometimes get into over outlining vs. “pantsing” (writing by the seat of the pants) or as it’s now being called, writing organically. I think the more you know about your characters in advance, the easier it is to follow them around and to know what’s going to work for the story or not. Now, that’s not to say surprises don’t happen. Readers of Death al Dente, I had no idea Dean aka Elvis and Linda had twin daughters until they showed up, but can you imagine the story without them? Nor did I know what role Adam would have or how important Landon would be to understanding Erin and her family.

 

Village #2 takes place later in the summer, during the annual Summer Faire Arts and Food Festival, with its signature event, a steak grill-off. Naturally, the working title is Crime Rib. My hunny is an excellent grill master, and we feature his filet with huckleberry-morel sauce.

 

I’m currently writing the first book in my Seattle Spice Shop Mysteries, working title Spiced to Death. Pepper Reece, owner of a spice shop in Seattle’s Pike Place Market, investigates when she finds a homeless man new to the neighborhood dead in her doorway. As a college student and a young lawyer in Seattle, I spent many happy hours in the Market, and am delighted to be taking readers there on the page. It is confusing, talking about Village #1 with readers, working on Village #2 with my editor, and writing Spice #1 – but it’s a great problem to have!”


Working on all those stories almost simultaneously, I can see why you'd almost HAVE to be a plotter!

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becke_davis
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author LESLIE BUDEWITZ!

Leslie - I have a couple of questions for you, if you don't mind.

 

1) What's the best advice you ever received, from a writing standpoint?

 

2) Who were your favorite authors when you were growing up?

 

3) Have you read any mysteries lately that you'd like to recommend?

 

Thank you!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author LESLIE BUDEWITZ!


becke_davis wrote:

Leslie - I have a couple of questions for you, if you don't mind.

 

1) What's the best advice you ever received, from a writing standpoint?

 

2) Who were your favorite authors when you were growing up?

 

3) Have you read any mysteries lately that you'd like to recommend?

 

Thank you!


Here's Leslie's response:

 

 

1) What's the best advice you ever received, from a writing standpoint?

 

 Oh, gosh. I’ve received so much good advice – and what seems most important changes, depending on the challenges I’m facing. I’ll go with an urging from Dennis Palumbo, mystery writer, screenwriter, and practicing therapist in LA who works with many writers, given at Bouchercon 2010, in San Francisco in a talk on writers’ block: “You right now are and have everything you need to be the writer you want to be.” And then he said “Writing is interactive. You solve the writing problems by writing.”

 

2) Who were your favorite authors when you were growing up?

 

 I read all the usual suspects, from the Happy Hollisters to the Bobbsey Twins, Nancy Drew, and then on to Agatha Christie, but can I tell you about my absolute favorite, a book I still cherish that isn’t well known these days? Calico Bush, by Rachel Field, first published in 1931. I still have the copy I bought with my own money at the only bookstore in town, in about 1969. Marguerite is a 12 year old orphan who sails for America from France in 1743, with her grandmother and uncle; when both die—the uncle on board ship and the grandmother shortly after arrival in Massachusetts—“Maggie” becomes a Bound-Out Girl, heading for Maine with a young pioneer family. It’s the perfect read for young girls, who are just beginning to wonder how they fits in the world. I re-read it occasionally, and love it more each time. It’s still in print, and I often give a copy to young girls I know.

 

3) Have you read any mysteries lately that you'd like to recommend?

 

I came late to the Louise Penny fan club, but am now an avid member. The latest, The Beautiful Mystery, takes us not to Three Pines but to a secluded monastery on a lake in northern Quebec, where we learn about medieval chant in the modern world and how monastic life is no shield from the sins and passionate failings that plague the outer world. And the relationship between Gamache and Beauvoir takes a new turn. I can hardly wait for the next book, out shortly. I’m also hooked on the audio books of Alan Bradley’s Flavia de Luce series. I’m sure he gets tired of hearing them described as utterly charming, but they are – and as addictive as the horehound drops Flavia adores.

Leslie

 

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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author LESLIE BUDEWITZ!

Leslie - Thank you so much for visiting with us this week! I'm so sorry you weren't able to sign in. I know the email response system is less than ideal - thanks for persevering!