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Merline
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-19-2010
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Re: Switching genres

Hi, Becke -

 

I used to love switching genres as it gave me a chance to flex different writing muscles.  I used longer, more formal sentence structure, old-timey words and a completely different voice for historicals.  Contemporaries require a shorter, faster, more dramatic style of writing. 

 

I've gotten away from historicals in recent years, tho, because they're much longer books and I'm trying to cut back on the time I spend in front of the computer <G>.  That's why I'm sooo enjoying doing this gitlz and glamor DUCHESS DIARIES series for Desire and the Specia Ops 2-in-1 novellas I'm doing with Lindsay McKenna.  

Contributor
Merline
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-19-2010
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!

Hi again Becke -

 

Ahhhhh, the call.  You'll get a chuckle out of mine.  A few weeks after I retired from the AF I submitted a novella to Harlequin for their trial "short reads" program.  The editor called and said they loved the story and wanted to buy it.   The only problem was that she thought the POV transitions were a little rough in places.

 

I was sitting there thinking POV?  POV?  I had no clue what she was talking about.  In the Air Force POV stands for Privately Owned Vehicle.  I didn't say anything, tho, just decided I would figure it out.  

 

Ninety-five books later, I'm still working on those damned transitions!!!

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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Switching genres


Merline wrote:

Hi, Becke -

 

I used to love switching genres as it gave me a chance to flex different writing muscles.  I used longer, more formal sentence structure, old-timey words and a completely different voice for historicals.  Contemporaries require a shorter, faster, more dramatic style of writing. 

 

I've gotten away from historicals in recent years, tho, because they're much longer books and I'm trying to cut back on the time I spend in front of the computer <G>.  That's why I'm sooo enjoying doing this gitlz and glamor DUCHESS DIARIES series for Desire and the Specia Ops 2-in-1 novellas I'm doing with Lindsay McKenna.  


It sounds like you're enjoying the variety! 

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becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!


Merline wrote:

Hi again Becke -

 

Ahhhhh, the call.  You'll get a chuckle out of mine.  A few weeks after I retired from the AF I submitted a novella to Harlequin for their trial "short reads" program.  The editor called and said they loved the story and wanted to buy it.   The only problem was that she thought the POV transitions were a little rough in places.

 

I was sitting there thinking POV?  POV?  I had no clue what she was talking about.  In the Air Force POV stands for Privately Owned Vehicle.  I didn't say anything, tho, just decided I would figure it out.  

 

Ninety-five books later, I'm still working on those damned transitions!!!


I love it! POV, for the non-writers among us, is "point of view."

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!


becke_davis wrote:

Merline wrote:

Hi again Becke -

 

Ahhhhh, the call.  You'll get a chuckle out of mine.  A few weeks after I retired from the AF I submitted a novella to Harlequin for their trial "short reads" program.  The editor called and said they loved the story and wanted to buy it.   The only problem was that she thought the POV transitions were a little rough in places.

 

I was sitting there thinking POV?  POV?  I had no clue what she was talking about.  In the Air Force POV stands for Privately Owned Vehicle.  I didn't say anything, tho, just decided I would figure it out.  

 

Ninety-five books later, I'm still working on those damned transitions!!!


I love it! POV, for the non-writers among us, is "point of view."


Wait - NINETY-FIVE BOOKS???? Now THAT's impressive!!!

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,237
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!

I also got a chuckle out of Merline's "call" story, becke. As an English teacher, I've had to have students write about different elements of literature to examine a story, and so I'm used to thinking of P.O.V as "point of view"; however, I can see where, in the military, it might be necessary to designate some vehicles as being privately owned. It is amusing to see how we humans put together phrases and words, and then find ways to shorten those! By the way, one of my grammatical peeves is that so far, no one has come up with a cute, initial- driven form for "abbreviate", which in my view is too long a word to describe what we do when we shorten or use initials for longer words. :catlol:

 

BTW, Merline, I still have to explain to many students what a transition is. Just think of it as coming from the same root as the word transportation. A transition simply provides a link between one thought(or sentence, or POV, as the case may be)and another. I've seen books with mutliple POV's where the author(or maybe the book's editor) simply used a header with a character's name to show where the change occurs. If that seems too simplistic, it's also possible to start out the sentence in a new POV with words indicating which character is now speaking, as in " Ramses Emerson suspected his mother was up to something."

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!


Fricka wrote:

I also got a chuckle out of Merline's "call" story, becke. As an English teacher, I've had to have students write about different elements of literature to examine a story, and so I'm used to thinking of P.O.V as "point of view"; however, I can see where, in the military, it might be necessary to designate some vehicles as being privately owned. It is amusing to see how we humans put together phrases and words, and then find ways to shorten those! By the way, one of my grammatical peeves is that so far, no one has come up with a cute, initial- driven form for "abbreviate", which in my view is too long a word to describe what we do when we shorten or use initials for longer words. :catlol:

 

BTW, Merline, I still have to explain to many students what a transition is. Just think of it as coming from the same root as the word transportation. A transition simply provides a link between one thought(or sentence, or POV, as the case may be)and another. I've seen books with mutliple POV's where the author(or maybe the book's editor) simply used a header with a character's name to show where the change occurs. If that seems too simplistic, it's also possible to start out the sentence in a new POV with words indicating which character is now speaking, as in " Ramses Emerson suspected his mother was up to something."


That's a quote from Barbara Peters, isn't it?

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Please Welcome Featured Author MERLINE LOVELACE!

Thank you so much for visiting with us, Merline!