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ReadingPatti
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

becke_davis, I am confused. I clicked on the Global Reading Challenge and it goes into this Leighton Gage and His international crime posse.

 

What is going on? Is the  reading challenge or not?

 

ReadingPatti

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Michael_Sears
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Re: The Global Reading Challenge

There are lots of great mysteries set in Africa, and you can take your choice of novels written recently or some time ago as well as set in the present versus set in the past.

 

I strongly recommend Deon Meyer's crime fiction.  My current favorite is "Devils Peak" set in modern day South Africa.  One of the central themes is around a basically honest man who becomes a vigilante when the policing system fails him.  The book reflects a variety of issues which make you think about the country as well as deep characters and a fast moving plot.  The reason I say 'current favorite' is that his new book "Thirteen Hours" is out and it's picking up great reviews.  I haven't had a chance to read it yet.

 

Of course you can take your choice of the big names too: Elspeth Huxley, Agatha Christie, John Le Carre...

 

Africa's no challenge at all.  Now, Antarctica...

Michael Sears of Michael Stanley

A Carrion Death
The Second Death of Goodluck Tinubu
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Leighton-Gage
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On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

When Stan and I were together in Paris, wandering around Montmarte, (Okay, are you all jealous enough? I'll stop.) he mentioned, and highly recommended, a great South African movie. It's called District Nine, and I loved it.

 

It appeals on a number of levels.

Do you (Michael or Stan) want to share any comments about it with this group?

And do you know if there's going to be a sequel?

Leighton Gage
Crime Novels set in Brazil
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Stanley_Trollip
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Re: The Global Reading Challenge

Cara,

 

Have you heard of Caryl Ferey's book called ZULU?  It won the French Grand Prix in 2008 for Best Crime Novel.  I just picked it up.

 

Cheers

 

Stan

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becke_davis
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Re: The Global Reading Challenge

 

Cara51 wrote:

- Here's some French crime suggestions:

Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret series

Jean Patrick Manchette The Prone Gunman

Fred Vargas any of hers that have been translated

Jean-Philiipe Grange

Claude Izner in reality two sisters who write historical turn of the century mysteries

Léo Malet the Nestor Burma series - out of print but a joy if you find one

and for a contemporary look at Paris my Aimée Leduc Investigations.

 

I'm going to the Bilipo today on the Left Bank - a whole library devoted to crime fiction!

I'll get more names and an expanded French list of crime authors for your delectation.

 

Cara still running around Paris and not getting wifi often

 

Cara - thanks for the recommendations. I'm embarrassed to admit that yours and the Maigret books are the only ones I'm familiar with. I'll have to change that!

 

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Stanley_Trollip
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Re: On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

Aaah.  District 9.

 

The title is a take off of an area in Cape Town called District Six, which was for decades inhabited by Coloureds (people of mixed race) and people of Malay heritage.  The guardians of Arikaner culture - apartheid politicians, of course - thought it best to relocate everyone in District Six out of the city so that it could be White.  Another ugly blot on South African politics.

 

The film is is a science fiction parody of apartheid.  It is set in johannesburg, where an alien spaceship has had engine problems overhead.  The aliens come down to earth and are allowed to stay in an area set aside for them.  They look like prawns.  The film features a typical Afrikaner bureaucrat, Wikus van de Merwe, who is responsible for relocating the prawns to a distant rural area.  He is very funny because he is so stereotypical of all such people, taking himself extremely seriously, but particularly of South Africa's apartheid bureaucrats. 

 

The subtext of the movie is segregation and xenophobia, and mocks what happened in South Africa during the dark years with wit and a sharp blade.  The film was produced for $30 million and shot on location in a Johannesburg Black township.  It presents fictitious interviews, news footage, and video from surveillance cameras in a documentary format.  It grossed over $30 millioin in its first weekend in the States.

 

At present South Africa is plagued by gangs from West Africa, particularly Nigeria, who are at the root of much of the robbery and violence.  The Nigerian gang in the movie is brilliant - and caused the Nigerian Government to officially criticize the movie, asking movie theatres to remove it from circulation.  It was banned in Nigeria.

 

One of the great ironies depicted in the movie is that Wikus, the bueaucrat, becomes infected by the aliens and starts turning into one.  As he becomes less human, he becomes increasingly humane.

 

Two thumbs up!

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becke_davis
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Re: The Global Reading Challenge

[ Edited ]
danwaddell wrote:

*starts plotting great Antarctica crime novels*

 

I presume they should be published by Penguin?

 

I can recommend Peter Temple's books if you're short of an Aussie or two. Mike Robotham's too, though while Australian, his books aren't often set there.

 

 

These were the ones I came up with. Looks like I missed a few.

 

Ngaio Marsh – New Zealand

Paul Cleave – New Zealand

Kathryn Fox - Australia

Kerry Greenwood - Australia


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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

ReadingPatti wrote:

becke_davis, I am confused. I clicked on the Global Reading Challenge and it goes into this Leighton Gage and His international crime posse.

 

What is going on? Is the  reading challenge or not?

 

ReadingPatti

 

 

Now I'm confused, Patti. The link works for me. If it doesn't work for you, try searching "2010 Global Reading Challenge" on Google.

 

Their website has a link to this article.

 

Participate in a reading challenge

 

March 16, 9:23 PMCanada Book ExaminerMelanie Hains

 

If you are looking to expand your literary choices and discover new authors, I would recommend that you sign up for the 2010 Global Reading Challenge

It was created by blogger Dorte Jakobsen with technical assistance from fellow blogger, Kerrie Smith. There are three levels of the challenge:

The Easy Level

  •  You must read one novel each from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America (includes Central America) and South America within 2010.
  •  Your choice from within your own continent must be from a country, state or author that you are unfamiliar with.

The Medium Level

  •  You must read two novels each from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America (includes Central America) and South America within 2010.
  •  These choices must come from twelve different countries or states.

The Expert Level

  •  You must read two novels each from Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America (includes Central America) and South America within 2010. In addition, read two novels that are set in Antarctica. 
  •  These choices must come from fourteen different countries or states. 

Participants sign up and choose which level they would like to attempt, with the option to upgrade if they find their level easier than anticipated. Dorte Jakobsen then encourages the participants to write reviews of their chosen novels. Links to the reviews can be posted on the site and these are organized by continent. Over 160 reviews have been posted so far. 

As of March 16, 2010, eighty-eight participants had signed up on the site. Its creator believes that the majority of those who have joined are from Europe and North America. She therefore predicts that, other than Antarctica for the expert participants, South America might be the most challenging continent to those who have joined.

Word of the challenge has spread from blog to blog as participants post links to the challenge from their own web-spaces. As Dorte Jakobsen puts it, "I think that is how most challenges grow. They spread like rings in water."

 

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becke_davis
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Re: On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

 

Leighton-Gage wrote:

When Stan and I were together in Paris, wandering around Montmarte, (Okay, are you all jealous enough? I'll stop.) he mentioned, and highly recommended, a great South African movie. It's called District Nine, and I loved it.

 

It appeals on a number of levels.

Do you (Michael or Stan) want to share any comments about it with this group?

And do you know if there's going to be a sequel?

 

My husband saw DISTRICT NINE and loved it - he saw it months ago and still talks about it.

 

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becke_davis
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Re: On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

 

Stanley_Trollip wrote:

Aaah.  District 9.

 

The title is a take off of an area in Cape Town called District Six, which was for decades inhabited by Coloureds (people of mixed race) and people of Malay heritage.  The guardians of Arikaner culture - apartheid politicians, of course - thought it best to relocate everyone in District Six out of the city so that it could be White.  Another ugly blot on South African politics.

 

The film is is a science fiction parody of apartheid.  It is set in johannesburg, where an alien spaceship has had engine problems overhead.  The aliens come down to earth and are allowed to stay in an area set aside for them.  They look like prawns.  The film features a typical Afrikaner bureaucrat, Wikus van de Merwe, who is responsible for relocating the prawns to a distant rural area.  He is very funny because he is so stereotypical of all such people, taking himself extremely seriously, but particularly of South Africa's apartheid bureaucrats. 

 

The subtext of the movie is segregation and xenophobia, and mocks what happened in South Africa during the dark years with wit and a sharp blade.  The film was produced for $30 million and shot on location in a Johannesburg Black township.  It presents fictitious interviews, news footage, and video from surveillance cameras in a documentary format.  It grossed over $30 millioin in its first weekend in the States.

 

At present South Africa is plagued by gangs from West Africa, particularly Nigeria, who are at the root of much of the robbery and violence.  The Nigerian gang in the movie is brilliant - and caused the Nigerian Government to officially criticize the movie, asking movie theatres to remove it from circulation.  It was banned in Nigeria.

 

One of the great ironies depicted in the movie is that Wikus, the bueaucrat, becomes infected by the aliens and starts turning into one.  As he becomes less human, he becomes increasingly humane.

 

Two thumbs up!

 

My husband has been after me to watch this. I wonder if it's out on Netflex yet.

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

 

becke_davis wrote:

 

Stanley_Trollip wrote:

Aaah.  District 9.

 

The title is a take off of an area in Cape Town called District Six, which was for decades inhabited by Coloureds (people of mixed race) and people of Malay heritage.  The guardians of Arikaner culture - apartheid politicians, of course - thought it best to relocate everyone in District Six out of the city so that it could be White.  Another ugly blot on South African politics.

 

The film is is a science fiction parody of apartheid.  It is set in johannesburg, where an alien spaceship has had engine problems overhead.  The aliens come down to earth and are allowed to stay in an area set aside for them.  They look like prawns.  The film features a typical Afrikaner bureaucrat, Wikus van de Merwe, who is responsible for relocating the prawns to a distant rural area.  He is very funny because he is so stereotypical of all such people, taking himself extremely seriously, but particularly of South Africa's apartheid bureaucrats. 

 

The subtext of the movie is segregation and xenophobia, and mocks what happened in South Africa during the dark years with wit and a sharp blade.  The film was produced for $30 million and shot on location in a Johannesburg Black township.  It presents fictitious interviews, news footage, and video from surveillance cameras in a documentary format.  It grossed over $30 millioin in its first weekend in the States.

 

At present South Africa is plagued by gangs from West Africa, particularly Nigeria, who are at the root of much of the robbery and violence.  The Nigerian gang in the movie is brilliant - and caused the Nigerian Government to officially criticize the movie, asking movie theatres to remove it from circulation.  It was banned in Nigeria.

 

One of the great ironies depicted in the movie is that Wikus, the bueaucrat, becomes infected by the aliens and starts turning into one.  As he becomes less human, he becomes increasingly humane.

 

Two thumbs up!

 

My husband has been after me to watch this. I wonder if it's out on Netflex yet.

 

 

 

Yes it is, is out on DVD for a while now.

 

the trailer

 

 
http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi262144537/
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Re: On the subject of great stuff coming out of Africa...

Speaking of movies and foreign mysteries. You guys were mentioning Antarctica. Anyone seen

Whiteout?

 

trailer

 

 
http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi315359769/
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tonyakappes
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Very cool blog site. I've flagged it as a favorite.

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tonyakappes
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Hi Leighton,

Did you get to Malice this year in DC?

Also I'm working on my first mystery, changing genres a bit, and where do you get most of your research?

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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

tonyakappes wrote:

Very cool blog site. I've flagged it as a favorite.

 

Welcome tonyakappes,I agree MIE is one of the best I have read.I keep it on my homepage to keep in the loop of events that I wouldn't necessarily know.,.and to keep up with All the Authors...Susan Vtc..

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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Leighton-Gage
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Malice and Research

Hi Tony,

 

No, I didn't get to Malice.

The full name of that conference, for those of you who don't know what Tony is talking about, is Malice Domestic, and I've always thought of it (Tony, please correct me if I'm wrong) as an event dedicated to folks who read and write cozies.

My books are anything but, so I have never considered attending.

 

Research? The news mostly.

 

Remember, Tony, that I've lived in Brazil, on and off, since 1973. The language we use at home is Portuguese. The newspaper and the news magazine we receive are both Brazilian. So is the news we watch on television. We have a relative who's a federal cop, know another fellow (extremely well) who headed up São Paulo's (750 man strong) homicide squad , I followed his men around on many occasions, And I once started (and profoundly researched) a documentary about a delegado of the civil police who went to the United States to study with the FBI. I never finished the documentary, but I learned a lot in the process.

 

When I sit down to write, I begin by drawing on personal experience. Then I fill it in, mostly by looking up news stories on the internet, burrowing through archives, or buying books that deal with the issues.

 

Liberation theology and the land wars, the subjects of Blood of the Wicked, have been the subject of many stories and articles. In that book, like the other two in the series, you can read "Author's Notes" at the end that atest to the veracity of many of the issues I write about.

 

In the most recent book, Dying Gasp, I drew heavily on a book by Gilberto Dimenstein, a prize-winning reporter who traveled the northeast, interviewed many young prostitutes, and published a book called Meninas da Noite (Girls of the night.) I highly recommend it to those of you who read Portuguese. Unfortunately, it hasn't been translated into any other language.

 

Good luck, Tony, with that first mystery of yours. Here's hoping you'll been joining us with a guest slot on Murder is Everywhere sometime soon.

Leighton Gage
Crime Novels set in Brazil
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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

[ Edited ]

Hi Tonya! Thanks for joining us!

 

Tonya and VT/Suze - I've never been to Malice Domestic but that's high on my list of events I want to attend one day. I made it to my first Bouchercon last October and was completely awestruck. I was surprised at the number of mystery authors (all kinds - not just romantic suspense) at the Romantic Times conference. There were a lot more male mystery authors than I expected, but it makes sense for them to attend - they were outnumbered by women about ten to one. I think they enjoyed a lot of attention, and not just for their books!

 

I'm curious, Leighton and all, since you are all so widespread how do you decide which conferences to attend? Do you stick to conferences close to home or come to the U.S. for the big ones like Bouchercon and Thrillerfest? I seem to remember Yrsa was on a panel at Bouchercon last year, and I'm kicking myself for missing it.

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

A couple of questions for any or all of you:

 

1) Are you a plotter or a pantser?

 

2) Do you like it quiet when you work or do you have a playlist for the book you're working on?

 

3) What was the last book you read?

 

4) What author(s) influenced you the most?

 

and

 

5) Please tell us a little (if you can) about the book you're working on now.

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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Interesting questions!  Stanley and I have been both.  With our first book - A Carrion Death - we had a concept and some characters and we went with the flow.  Pretty often the flow took us into dead ends and washed us up on the beach.  We had to back-track and rethink.  We had a lot of fun, but it took us a LONG time.  Three years to write the book.  (It was really two books; we threw one away.)

We approached our second book quite differently.  We spent a lot of time discussing the plot, drawing mind maps, connecting events and so on.  Some things changed, but the synopsis after all that planning would still be a pretty good description of the book.

We decided we had this writing business licked.  The book took less than half the time, and we were pretty comfortable with the way it was going most of the time.  Then came the third book.  We tried to plan it like the second, but it twisted and turned in our grasp and ended up more like the first.  I guess the idea and the things the characters do will have the final say in the end...

Michael Sears of Michael Stanley

A Carrion Death
The Second Death of Goodluck Tinubu
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Michael_Sears
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Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Personally I like it quiet.  Classical music is okay, but it mustn't be something like opera.  I find the human voice draws me into the song and breaks concentration.  Stan is the opposite.  He writes well and happily sitting cramped in economy on an international flight with a baby crying on either side.

 

As chance would have it, I just finished reading fellow posse member Tim Hallinan's novel A Nail Through the Heart.  From the first page you're in Thailand getting to know it by seeing it through the eyes of the people who live there.  Great characters - one of the nastiest villains I've ever met.  You get to care about them all pretty soon and want to see how their lives develop. The plot keeps you intrigued, too.  And the ending is terrific.  But I'm not going to say anything more about that or I'll spoil it...

 

One of the authors I greatly respect is John Le Carre.  I think his writing is really superb.  Sometimes I just have to stop and wonder how on earth he did something.  I like to read his books three time - once for enjoyment, once to see how he structured the book, and once to see how he gets the effects he wants.  Not to say every book is perfect.  He went through one or two I didn't much like.  But they were all well written.  I'm told that Henning Mankell once said Le Carre was "the best writer who'll never win a Nobel prize". 

 

 

Michael Sears of Michael Stanley

A Carrion Death
The Second Death of Goodluck Tinubu