Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

Yrsa_S wrote:

Hi Dan,

 

I for one am going to get your ancestor tracing kids book - it sounds excellent. While I am at it I am also going to get the grown up ones as laughing and screaming should even each other out.

 

bye Yrsa

 


That book sounds great to me, too. My genealogy research has hit a wall until I can afford either a trip to Europe and/or more Ancestry.com access!

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Yrsa - You seem extremely fluent in English. Did you consider translating your books yourself, or would that have been too much of a chore. Are most people in Iceland bi-lingual?

 

Also, were you affected by the recent volcanic eruption?

Contributor
danwaddell
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎04-30-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

HI Becke,

 

I'm pretty much obsessed with the hidden side of the city. The city plays as much a part in The Blood Detective as any of the characters. London is drenched in history. I'm fascinated by the part the past plays in the present, how it can leave a stain, or how buried secrets can seep to the surface like blood through sand.

 

As for TV shows, nearly all my favourite ones are US imports!! Though I have to admit we have exported a few good ones...

 

Yrsa, thanks - we could do a kids book swap.  Laughing and screaming - pretty much sums up parenthood...

I like to think that I know better than to think that I know better.
Contributor
Yrsa_S
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎04-28-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Hi Becke,

 

although most if not all (with the exception of about 15 people) Icelanders are bi-lingual as you will not get very far on Icelandic alone. My English is however a bit better than the average Icelander as I spent a good part of my childhood in Texas where my parents were furthering their studies. I used to have the greatest accent but have unfortunately lost it somewhere down the line. I could probably revive it if I were to take a month or two off and move back, something that would be worthwhile in my opinion.

 

Regarding the volcano it has been pretty disruptive although we have yet to see any ash raining down here in the Reykjavík area. The farmers on the south coast have been hit the worst and there seems to be no end to the misery they have to put up with, not to mention the animals in the area. Personally I have had to postpone my honeymoon since me and my husband don't dare buy the trip we intended to take as it is unclear wether or not we will be able to leave the country due to flight restrictions that go on and off without warning. This is actually not very sad seeing that this honeymoon is already late by about 15 years so it can wait a bit longer without anyone panicking.

 

bye for now

Yrsa 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

danwaddell wrote:

HI Becke,

 

I'm pretty much obsessed with the hidden side of the city. The city plays as much a part in The Blood Detective as any of the characters. London is drenched in history. I'm fascinated by the part the past plays in the present, how it can leave a stain, or how buried secrets can seep to the surface like blood through sand.

 

As for TV shows, nearly all my favourite ones are US imports!! Though I have to admit we have exported a few good ones...

 

Yrsa, thanks - we could do a kids book swap.  Laughing and screaming - pretty much sums up parenthood...

 

I remember when I lived in England I would get really homesick for American shows. We only got things like Police Woman and Starsky and Hutch!

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

Yrsa_S wrote:

Hi Becke,

 

although most if not all (with the exception of about 15 people) Icelanders are bi-lingual as you will not get very far on Icelandic alone. My English is however a bit better than the average Icelander as I spent a good part of my childhood in Texas where my parents were furthering their studies. I used to have the greatest accent but have unfortunately lost it somewhere down the line. I could probably revive it if I were to take a month or two off and move back, something that would be worthwhile in my opinion.

 

Regarding the volcano it has been pretty disruptive although we have yet to see any ash raining down here in the Reykjavík area. The farmers on the south coast have been hit the worst and there seems to be no end to the misery they have to put up with, not to mention the animals in the area. Personally I have had to postpone my honeymoon since me and my husband don't dare buy the trip we intended to take as it is unclear wether or not we will be able to leave the country due to flight restrictions that go on and off without warning. This is actually not very sad seeing that this honeymoon is already late by about 15 years so it can wait a bit longer without anyone panicking.

 

bye for now

Yrsa 

 

Texas and Iceland - now THAT is a combination you don't come across very often! I hope you get your honeymoon soon -- are you going anywhere exciting?

 

Author
Stanley_Trollip
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

As I have got to know the rest of the gang here, I must admit I feel as though I am in kindergarten.  Everyone has written so much - so many books!  Michael and I are infants in this arena - neither of us had written any meaningful fiction until we were almost 60!  We both had written some non-fiction - Michael in mathematics and mathematics education, and me in the areas of pilot safety and the educational applications of computers.  We were academics after all.  Certainly as I read the postings of the others I learn so much - it is a pleasure to be part of this posse.

 

With respect to McCall Smith, I have mixed feelings about his name cropping up in virtually every review.  It is great, on the one hand, to have the name of a HUGE author mentioned, and he has made millions of people actually know that Botswana is a country;  on the other hand it would be nice to have our work reviewed in of its own right.  I think the reason for the comparisons is that there are so few authors who have written in the Botswana setting.  I would rather be compared to Tony Hillerman, for example, whose books have many attributes common with ours.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

Stanley_Trollip wrote:

As I have got to know the rest of the gang here, I must admit I feel as though I am in kindergarten.  Everyone has written so much - so many books!  Michael and I are infants in this arena - neither of us had written any meaningful fiction until we were almost 60!  We both had written some non-fiction - Michael in mathematics and mathematics education, and me in the areas of pilot safety and the educational applications of computers.  We were academics after all.  Certainly as I read the postings of the others I learn so much - it is a pleasure to be part of this posse.

 

With respect to McCall Smith, I have mixed feelings about his name cropping up in virtually every review.  It is great, on the one hand, to have the name of a HUGE author mentioned, and he has made millions of people actually know that Botswana is a country;  on the other hand it would be nice to have our work reviewed in of its own right.  I think the reason for the comparisons is that there are so few authors who have written in the Botswana setting.  I would rather be compared to Tony Hillerman, for example, whose books have many attributes common with ours.

 

 

Blame me for bringing him up -- I thought "Botswana" and there he was. On the other hand, NOW if I hear "Botswana" I will think "Michael Stanley," so if he-who-shall-not-be-named ever visits here I will compare him to you constantly.

 

Hillerman's books are like yours? Well, I planned to buy your books in any case, but now I'm really curious. Tell me more!

 

Also, I completely relate to the age thing. I'm 58 and have been a garden writer since I was about 40, so even that was a late start. But now I just started struggling with fiction a few years ago, a plan I kick myself for not putting into practice when I was about twenty.

Author
Stanley_Trollip
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

I have always liked Hillerman for his portrayal of the Navaho, and his willingness to incorporate their beliefs and culture.  In particular Hillerman uses shamans unashamedly.  We have noticed, particularly with A Carrion Death, that many western readers don't take our witchdoctor seriously.  Several critics have said that we should have left him out.  Yet, to do so, would have been removing an important and pervasive aspect of Botswana culture.  For those of us who live in Africa, we know both how influential witchdoctors are and how often what they do does not fit into western scientific practice.  I certainly don't dismiss their powers even though I am a scientist by training.

 

Tim (Hallinan) wrote a blog in Murder Is Everywhere a few weeks back about ghosts.  I resonated with his story.  Even though I don't have a similar story, I've always believed in poltergeists for example. I also believe in the inability of modern science to explain issues such as ghosts and poltergeists and other "supernatural" events.

Contributor
Michael_Sears
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎05-02-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

I think a fair question is: If you guys are ambivalent about being compared to McCall Smith, why set your books in Botswana?  What's wrong with South Africa (where you live) or Namibia, for example?  As one editor at a Crime Writers Association convention in London said to us, Why Botswana?  McCall Smith owns Botswana!

Well, the answer is that not only did we start writing fiction late, as Stan pointed out, but we also took a long time to do it.  Because of the plot, we needed a country with wide open areas only marginally controlled so that the bad guys could get away with their dastardly deeds undetected.  South Africa fits that bill far less well than Botswana.  And we hadn't heard of Mma Romotswa when we started our first book.  When we discovered that there was already a pretty famous fictional detective in Botswana, we actually did consider moving our setting to Namibia.  The problem is that we know Botswana well and have many contacts there.  Namibia we know much less well.  And we really enjoy the cultures and diversity of the country.  The environment ranges from the arid Kalahari Desert to the lush Chobe River area with the fantastic Okavango Delta area in between.  So we stuck with what we knew.

Actually our books are very different in concept and style from the McCall Smith ones.  And after all, no one owns a country except the people who live there...

Michael Sears of Michael Stanley

A Carrion Death
The Second Death of Goodluck Tinubu
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

Michael_Sears wrote:

I think a fair question is: If you guys are ambivalent about being compared to McCall Smith, why set your books in Botswana?  What's wrong with South Africa (where you live) or Namibia, for example?  As one editor at a Crime Writers Association convention in London said to us, Why Botswana?  McCall Smith owns Botswana!

Well, the answer is that not only did we start writing fiction late, as Stan pointed out, but we also took a long time to do it.  Because of the plot, we needed a country with wide open areas only marginally controlled so that the bad guys could get away with their dastardly deeds undetected.  South Africa fits that bill far less well than Botswana.  And we hadn't heard of Mma Romotswa when we started our first book.  When we discovered that there was already a pretty famous fictional detective in Botswana, we actually did consider moving our setting to Namibia.  The problem is that we know Botswana well and have many contacts there.  Namibia we know much less well.  And we really enjoy the cultures and diversity of the country.  The environment ranges from the arid Kalahari Desert to the lush Chobe River area with the fantastic Okavango Delta area in between.  So we stuck with what we knew.

Actually our books are very different in concept and style from the McCall Smith ones.  And after all, no one owns a country except the people who live there...

 

 Good Morning..Well said Michael Sears.Have either of you ever read anything by Lisa Fugard"Skinners Drift" her only book so far..I really liked it.Gave me a whole new appreciation for  'Africa"...Have you toured the US with your Book?..Best  Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Author
Stanley_Trollip
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

I haven't read Skinner's Drift but will look for it.  I assume she is related to the very famous author Athol Fugard.

 

I just picked up a book called ZULU, by Caryl Ferey.  It won the French Grand Prix for Best Crime Novel of 2008.  Don't know anything about it, but am looking forward to finding out.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

Stanley_Trollip wrote:

I have always liked Hillerman for his portrayal of the Navaho, and his willingness to incorporate their beliefs and culture.  In particular Hillerman uses shamans unashamedly.  We have noticed, particularly with A Carrion Death, that many western readers don't take our witchdoctor seriously.  Several critics have said that we should have left him out.  Yet, to do so, would have been removing an important and pervasive aspect of Botswana culture.  For those of us who live in Africa, we know both how influential witchdoctors are and how often what they do does not fit into western scientific practice.  I certainly don't dismiss their powers even though I am a scientist by training.

 

Tim (Hallinan) wrote a blog in Murder Is Everywhere a few weeks back about ghosts.  I resonated with his story.  Even though I don't have a similar story, I've always believed in poltergeists for example. I also believe in the inability of modern science to explain issues such as ghosts and poltergeists and other "supernatural" events.

 

 

You raise a good point - do you edit out features of your book just to make it more believable or palatable to the American market or do you stick to your guns and make it true to life? I vote for realism.

 

I think anyone who picks up a book based in South Africa is either going to already know something about that part of the world or WANT to know something about it. The real thing, not the Reader's Digest Condensed Book, edited-for-television version. 


Hillerman's books wouldn't be the same without the shamans; I'm really intrigued to read about your witch doctor now.

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

I can't believe you were told another author "owns" Botswana. That's like saying Tony Hillerman owns the American Southwest, or that Ian Rankin owns Scotland. And what about cities like London or New York? Plenty of authors "are" those cities, but it's never stopped readers from picking up books by others. Good grief, I can understand why you'd be frustrated at the mention of that other author's name!

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Please Welcome LEIGHTON GAGE & HIS INTERNATIONAL CRIME POSSE

 

Stanley_Trollip wrote:

I haven't read Skinner's Drift but will look for it.  I assume she is related to the very famous author Athol Fugard.

 

I just picked up a book called ZULU, by Caryl Ferey.  It won the French Grand Prix for Best Crime Novel of 2008.  Don't know anything about it, but am looking forward to finding out.

 

.Yes Lisa is his only daughter..I just googled her.I was on twitter and came upon 'The Cape Town Book Fair"..Looks great .Will you both be there? Best Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Frequent Contributor
Leighton-Gage
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎10-23-2009
0 Kudos

The Global Reading Challenge

The fact that you're here, reading this, suggests you're interested in international crime fiction.

If so, I hope you've heard of the Global Reading Challenge.

And, if you haven't, please read on.

 

The Global Reading Challenge is an initiative of two enthusiastic mystery fans from opposite sides of the world.

 

Dorthe lives in Denmark. You can access her blog here:

http://djskrimiblog.blogspot.com/

 

Kerrie lives in Australia. And you can access her blog here:

http://paradise-mysteries.blogspot.com/

 

Ninety-five different bloggers have already signed up to participate in their challenge.

Those bloggers will be reviewing crime novels from all over the world.

 

What does it mean to you?

Well, if you're a blogger, and you love international crime, you can participate and share your thoughts with people you might not otherwise reach.

 

And, if you're a reader of international crime, you now have a terrific new source of reviews.

 

The levels of participation, the rules and the reviews are all to be found here:

http://2010globalchallenge.blogspot.com/

 

The Global Reading Challenge. Drop in and have a look. I love it!

Leighton Gage
Crime Novels set in Brazil
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Global Reading Challenge

Wow, I really appreciate you passing on this information. What a cool idea!

 

And, by the way, HAPPY CINCO DE MAYO!

 

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,755
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: The Global Reading Challenge

 

Here's the link again:http://2010globalchallenge.blogspot.com/

 

The Easy Challenge
Read one novel from each of these continents in the course of 2010:
Africa
Asia
Australasia
Europe
North America (incl Central America)
South America

From your own continent: try to find a country, state or author that is new to you.


The Medium Challenge
Read two novels from each of these continents in the course of 2010:
Africa
Asia
Australasia
Europe
North America (incl Central America)
South America

Try to find novels from twelve different countries or states.


The Expert Challenge
Read two novels from each of these continents in the course of 2010:
Africa
Asia
Australasia
Europe
North America (incl Central America)
South America
Add two novels which are set in Antarctica.

Select novels from fourteen different countries or states.

Author
Cara51
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎04-28-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Global Reading Challenge

- Here's some French crime suggestions:

Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret series

Jean Patrick Manchette The Prone Gunman

Fred Vargas any of hers that have been translated

Jean-Philiipe Grange

Claude Izner in reality two sisters who write historical turn of the century mysteries

Léo Malet the Nestor Burma series - out of print but a joy if you find one

and for a contemporary look at Paris my Aimée Leduc Investigations.

 

I'm going to the Bilipo today on the Left Bank - a whole library devoted to crime fiction!

I'll get more names and an expanded French list of crime authors for your delectation.

 

Cara still running around Paris and not getting wifi often

Contributor
danwaddell
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎04-30-2010
0 Kudos

Re: The Global Reading Challenge

*starts plotting great Antarctica crime novels*

 

I presume they should be published by Penguin?

 

I can recommend Peter Temple's books if you're short of an Aussie or two. Mike Robotham's too, though while Australian, his books aren't often set there.

I like to think that I know better than to think that I know better.