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becke_davis
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Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

This week our featured guest is New York Times Best Selling Author WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

 

 

His website is here: http://www.williamkentkrueger.com/

 

Newsflash! "Hixton," a short story from the MWA anthology Crimes by Moonlight: Mysteries from the Dark Side, was nominated for a Short Story Dagger by the Crime Writers' Association.

 

Northwest Angle has been nominated for the 2012 Midwest Booksellers Choice Award for Best Fiction.

 


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becke_davis
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Events - see the full list here: http://www.williamkentkrueger.com/sign.html

 

August 23
Barnes and Noble, Har Mar Mall
Roseville, MN
7PM

 

September 4
Barnes & Noble, Galleria
Edina, MN 
7 PM

 

September 5
BOND (Branching Out In New Directions)
Brandeis Women
Eden Prairie, MN
Time: TBA (AM – Noon)

 

September 12
Wood County District Public Library
Bowling Green, OH 
Noon

 

September 13
"Meet the Author" Event
Cuyahoga County Public Library - Berea Branch
Berea, OH
7 PM

 

September 17
Inaugural Author Series/Friends of the Duluth Public Library
August Fitger Room – Fitger's Complex
Duluth, MN
5 PM
Ticketed Event - Order Form (PDF)

 

September 18
Barnes & Noble, Miller Hill Mall
Duluth, MN 
3 PM

 

October 11
Long Prairie Public Library
Long Prairie, MN
7 PM


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becke_davis
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ABOUT KENT

cover

 

Birth and Afterbirth

 

Call me Kent.

 

I was born November 16, 1950 in Torrington, Wyoming, the third of four children whose parents convinced them that they had gypsy blood flowing through their veins. Before I graduated from high school, I'd lived in eleven different houses, in eight different cities, in six different states. By the time I was old enough to know what's what, I realized that we simply moved every time the rent was due. Some of my best years were spent in Hood River, Oregon, so when people ask where I'm from, I usually lay that "honor" on Oregon.

 

I attended Stanford University for one year. In the turbulent spring of 1970, I understood the administration and I didn't see eye-to-eye on a lot of political issues. For example, they didn't look kindly on my participation in a takeover of the president's office in protest of what I saw as the University's complicity in weapons production during the Vietnam War. Not only did they sic the riot police on me, they evaporated my academic scholarship, forcing me to leave after my freshman year. Which was okay by me. I'd met the woman I knew I wanted to marry, and she lived in Nebraska. So I headed east.

 

The Real World

 

Over the next few years, I logged a bit of timber, worked a lot of construction, published a few magazine articles, and generally enjoyed life. I married—that lovely Cornhusker named Diane—and we pretty much had a ball.

 

Then we conceived our first child, a daughter whose name would be Seneca, and we had to get serious about life. In the summer of 1980, we moved to St. Paul, Minnesota so that Diane could attend law school. Talk about Hell. She gave birth to our second child, Adam, in the first semester of her final year—and still made the Dean's List.

 

It was during this period of time that I began to write in earnest and to develop the habits that became the basis for the writing discipline I follow to this day.

broilerFlame Broiled Fiction

 

At nineteen, I wanted to be Ernest Hemingway. I read everything by him and about him. In the course of my reading, I stumbled onto a couple of pieces of information concerning Papa's lifestyle that I tried to incorporate into my own way of being. First of all, Hemingway never wore underwear. Well hell, I thought, whatever was good enough for Papa was good enough for me. Right away I discovered that Hemingway must have been made of sterner stuff, and I went back to wearing my beloved Fruit of the Looms. But I also learned in my reading that Hemingway's favorite time of day for writing was at first light. I gave it a try. And I liked it.

 

For several years after moving to St. Paul, we lived at the edge of a quiet neighborhood called Tangletown. (The streets were confusing and lovely.) A block away stood a café called the St. Clair Broiler that opened its doors at 6:00 a.m. I began rising at 5:30 to groom and prepare for the day, then I'd hit the Broiler and spend an hour or so writing before I hustled off to my job that kept food on the table and a roof over our heads. Mostly I wrote short stories, some of which were published, and couple of which won awards. Writing longhand in cheap wire-bound notebooks in booth #4 at the Broiler became for me a part of the magic of the creative process.

 

Although I write full time now and don't have to get up at the crack of dawn, I still do. I make the trek to the Broiler and spend a couple of hours hunched over my notebook while the sun rises over the shops across the street and the traffic begins to fill Snelling Avenue. For me, it's still the best time of every day. Not only am I dreaming in those hours, I'm fulfilling the dream.

 

I hope you've enjoyed this little voyeuristic peek at my life. Some of it, I swear, is true.

 

Addendum 2011: In the spirit of full disclosure, I need to add a little to my biography, particularly as it relates to my morning writing regime.  The St. Clair Broiler and I have separated, not because of anything on their part, but because I moved.  I still live in St. Paul, but such a great distance from the Broiler that it would be a difficult commute to write there every morning.  I still do all my creative work in a coffee shop; it’s just a different coffee shop these days.  Do I miss the Broiler?  Absolutely.  There will always be a place in my heart for the folks who welcomed me so warmly all those years, and, of course, for booth #4.

 

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becke_davis
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Kent's blog:http://williamkentkrueger.com/blog/

 

Bizarre!

June 7th, 2012

 

So, okay, here’s something way up there on the “Really Weird” scale.  It happened this way.

I went to Omaha to spend Memorial Day weekend with my wife’s family.  We left the Twin Cities Friday evening, drove to Des Moines, stayed the night, and arrived in Omaha on Saturday.  We visited cemeteries, placed flowers on family graves—a tradition I really dig—and that evening, my wife and I joined friends for drinks at a local brew pub.

 

Next thing I know, it’s 3:00 PM Sunday afternoon.  I wake up in the hospital with no recollection of the preceding 48 hours.  I’m kind of fuzzy, to say the least.  Diane, my wife, is the room, along with my brother-in-law.  As I come out of the haze, they’re laughing hysterically at everything I say.

 

“Where am I?” I ask.

 

They laugh, and my wife, good-naturedly says, “Lakeside Hospital.”

 

“How did I get here?”

 

They laugh.  “I brought you to the emergency room this morning,” she says.

 

“What’s wrong with me?”

 

This brings on a near hysterical bout of laughter.  “You have Transient Global Amnesia,” Diane finally manages to say.

 

I’m not sure if I should be upset, but her demeanor clearly indicates that I’m not in any real danger.  So I ask, “What’s so funny?”

 

“You’ve been asking the same questions for the last eight hours.”

 

So this is what, according to Diane, happened.  At 8:45 that Sunday morning, I suddenly began asking the same questions over and over again.  “Where are we?  How did we get here?  What day is it?”

 

Freaked, she drove me to the emergency room of a hospital two blocks from our hotel, where they did a CAT scan and an MRI, and determined that I hadn’t suffered a stroke or a seizure.  The neurologist came in on his day off because the situation intrigued him.  He finally diagnosed my condition as Transient Global Amnesia.  It’s a condition whose cause is unknown, but whose effect is temporary and with no lasting physiological or mental consequences.  I’ve just simply lost a couple of days out of my life, no memory at all of Friday afternoon through Sunday afternoon.

 

Weird.  Really weird.  An incredible reminder of how fragile everything is in life.

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Trickster's Point (Cork O'Connor Series #12)  

 

cover

 

Cork O'Connor is sitting in the shadow of a towering monolith known as Trickster's Point, deep in the Minnesota wilderness. Beside him is the first Native American governor-elect, Jubal Little, who is slowly dying with an arrow through his heart. Although the men have been bow hunting, this is no accident. The arrow in the governor's heart belongs to Cork.

 

When he becomes the primary suspect in the murder, Cork understands full well that he's been set up. As he works to clear his name and track the real killer, he recalls his long, complex relationship with Jubal, the Native kid who aspired to be a populist politician and grew to become a cunning man capable of treachery and murder. As Cork looks deeply into his own past, he comes face to face with the many motives, good and ill, that lead men and women into the difficult, sometimes deadly, political arena.

 

With crisp writing filled with the twists and turns his fans have come to expect, Krueger delivers another knockout novel of suspense.

 

Praise for Trickster's Point:

 

"Krueger’s intimate knowledge of Minnesota’s northern reaches and respect for Native American life, ancient and modern, provide an intricate setting for this gem of a mystery."
Publishers Weekly

 

"In addition to having a plot as cunningly treacherous as Trickster's Point itself, Krueger's latest mystery has that elegiac tone that's perfectly suited to O'Connor's character and to the harsh landscape where he lives and works."
Booklist

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Please welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!!

 

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dhaupt
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

[ Edited ]

Welcome!!!!

 

I had the imense pleasure of meeting Kent at the Barnes & Noble in St. Louis during the Atria Mystery Bus tour.

 

Kent you were a wonderful speaker and I really enjoyed learning more about you and your writing.

 

I would love to know the why behind your wonderful protagonist Cork O'Connor, what made you choose him or did he choose you.

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

You can read more about the Atria bus tour here: http://mysterybustour.tumblr.com/

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!


dhaupt wrote:

Welcome!!!!

 

I had the imense pleasure of meeting Kent at the Barnes & Noble in St. Louis during the Atria Mystery Bus tour.

 

Kent you were a wonderful speaker and I really enjoyed learning more about you and your writing.

 

I would love to know the why behind your wonderful protagonist Cork O'Connor, what made you choose him or did he choose you.

 

 


I'll add to Debbie's fabulous question: When you started this series, did you have the story arc for the whole series plotted out? Did you see it as having a beginning, middle and end or did you plan for each story to evolve as part of a long-running series with no end in sight?

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maxcat
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Welcome, Kent, I loved your insane biography and it had me chuckle a couple of times as that is the way life is and you never know where the pieces will fall. I do have one of your books in my TBR pile. It's Purgatory Ridge. I'm sure it will be a great read. Enjoy your week here at the Forum!

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Ryan_G
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

I have the second book in the series, but haven't read it yet.  I picked it up at a thrift store because of the locale.  I really need to read it sometime soon.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
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eadieburke
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Welcome Kent:

 

In honor of your visit, I decided to start reading your series, I am half-way through Iron Lake which I hope to finish reading by day's end. I must admit that the Olympics has cut into my reading time but they will be over in a week. I am anxious to finish Iron Lake - I need to find out where Paul is. 

 

There are a lot of things that strike me as familiar in your blog. First, my grandparents lived in Cheyene Wyoming and we visited there each summer from PA. My uncle lived in Spokane WA and he was a lumberjack. I even have Indian blood but it's Cherokee. And last but not least, I had 4 newspaper routes in the 90's that I delivered early in the morning like Paul. Like you, I love the early morning as a time for reflection. The newspaper routes were for exercise and I thought it was great that I was getting paid to exercise instead of belonging to a gym.

 

I found your story about your amnesia very interesting. Possibly you can use the info in one of your books! I like to read a series in order so it will take me awhile to get to your newest addition but I'm sure I'll enjoy getting there.

 

Hope you enjoy your visit with us and come back soon!

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
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optic_i
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Hi Kent Welcome ! 

 

I have read two of your books so far, "Red Knife and North West Angle"  Both were excellent !

I look forward to reading all of them.  I really am impressed by your wife. Havening her second child while in the first semester of  3rd year Law ! Yikes, and graduating with honors ! I was worried when my daughter broke her collar bone first semester of 3rd year Law. She couldn't carry anything for a while or drive to school. She did have friends who took turns helping her get to class and carry her stuff. But compared to havening a baby that was nothing !   

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williekent
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

First of all a big thanks to Becke for her invitation to join the book cruise this week.  I know she'll do a fine job captaining me through this new experience.

 

I'm available to answer any of those pesky questions that may have been burning in your brains, about the new Cork O'Connor novel, TRICKSTER'S POINT, or any other territory you'd like to cover.

 

Briefly, TRICKSTER'S POINT is the 12th book in my series, which is set in the great Northwoods of Minnesota.  It's a rumination on politics and the kind of people drawn to the political arena and who become successful there.  It's allowed me, in advance of an important election this fall, to take a few potshots at politicians in general.  Love the opening of this book, the first line especially: "The dying don't easily become the dead."

 

So, with that, I'll turn the podium over to all of you.  Let's have some fun!

Kent

 

 

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williekent
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Although she's human, my wife is also incredible in so many ways.  I wouldn't have been able to develope as a writer without her encouragement and suppport.  She's awesome!  And I still think that--maybe even more so--after nearly 40 years of marriage.

Kent

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williekent
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Eadie, the amnesia thing was tremendously eye-opening.  First of all, it brought home to roost how fragile we all are.  At any moment, without warning, something can go terribly wrong.  I'll use it in a story, of course, someday when I figure out how to make it work in the plot.  But then, isn't everything in author's life fodder for the imagination?

Kent

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williekent
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

Ryan, I hope you enjoy it. It's one my favorites. Kent
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williekent
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Re: Please Welcome WILLIAM KENT KRUEGER!

In answer to Deb and Becke's questions, the seed for the character of Cork O'Connor came to me long before the first story itself developed.  I saw in my mind's eye this guy who lived in the North Country of Minnesota, and all I really knew about him was that he was the kind of person who was so resilient that no matter how far down life pushed him, he would always bob back to the surface.  And his name, of course, would be Cork.

 

When I began IRON LAKE, the first in the series, I didn't know that it would be a series.  I just wanted to write a manuscript that was good enough to be published.  About two-thirds of the way along, I realized that I was creating relationships that were too complex to wrap up neatly at the end of that book.  So I thought about the emotional place where I wanted Cork and Jo and their kids to land eventually, and it seemed to me it would take three books to get there.  That's exactly what happened.  The initial story arc, the problems between Cork and his wife, are not really resolved until PURGATORY RIDGE, third in the series (and really good read!).

Kent