Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
0 Kudos

TWO Aerial Mysteries for your solution.

Hello all: I am Posting two aerial mysteries, you can try your hand and brain at solving them. Please Post your solutions, thank you. These mysteries are solved by Sherlock Holmes in "Sherlock Holmes and the Flying Machine." You can wait awhile to learn the solutions, which I will eventually Post, or you can jump the gun and see the solutions in the book.

 

Mystery 1. A balloonist is well supplied with oxygen, but is found to be dead, without a mark on his normal (for a recently dead person) appearing body. Autopsy shows nothing abnormal. What caused the balloonist's death?

 

Mystery 2. Professor Samuel Langley's manned steam powered Aerodrome leaves the launching track, but instead of flying it immediately crashes. The Aerodrome's design is perfect, there is no design flaw, and according to scientific principles it should have flown. Careful examination of the damaged Aerodrome reveals nothing amiss; it should have flown, but did not. Why didn't the Aerodrome fly?

 

All persons posting both answers correctly, will be made Honorary Aviators, just as Samuel Langley did for Sherlock Holmes. Good luck!

 

Phillip Duke

 

 

Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
0 Kudos

Re: TWO Aerial Mysteries for your solution.

Here are some possibly helpful hints, for each mystery:

 

Mystery One, The Dead Balloonist: The body's appearance shows lack of oxygen ws not the cause of death. The autopsy shows nothing amiss- the cause of death was not revealed by the autopsy, but Sherlock Holmes tells Watson that the fact there is nothing amiss, in itself is something amiss, and based on it he deduces the cause of death.

 

Mystery Two, The immediate crash on launch of Professor Langley's Aerodrome: Sherlock Holmes explains to Watson that Professor Langley and his Chief Engineer being very well qualified, he is willing to assume there is no design flaw, and since their examination of the wrecked Aerodrome reveals nothing amiss, there is nothing amiss with it. Therefore the reason must lie elsewhere than with the aircraft itself, and based on this Holmes visits the crash scene, and immediately demonstrates why the crash occurred.

 

Free ebook: At this time anyone posting correct answers for both the above mysteries, will be gifted an ebook from my marketing site Philduke.weebly.com, in addition to being made an honorary aviator.

150px-Samuel_Pierpont_Langley.jpg

Professor Samuel Langley.

Frequent Contributor
EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
0 Kudos

Re: TWO Aerial Mysteries for your solution.

I don't know what happened to the photo of Professor Langley, but will try to Post it again, along with photos of the Wright brothers.

 

150px-Samuel_Pierpont_Langley.jpg   Wrights.jpg