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becke_davis
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Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Jacqueline Seewald will be visiting with us tomorrow to talk about her books:

 

 

 

The Inferno Collection

 

 

 

 

The Drowning Pool 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dhaupt
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Jacqueline Seewald
nominated for a Nebula Award 2008
author of The Drowning Pool, Five Star/Gale 2009
The Inferno Collection, Five Star hardcover, Wheeler large print 2008

 

Here are links to some interviews and reviews about Jacqueline and her books:

 

http://mysteriouspeople.blogspot.com/2009/05/conversation-with-jacqueline-seewald.html

 

http://susanwhitfield.blogspot.com/2009/09/drowning-pool-author-jacqueline-seewald.html

 

http://advicefromeditors.blogspot.com/2009/08/guest-blogger-jacqueline-seewald.html

 

http://noveljourney.blogspot.com/2009/06/author-interview-jacqueline-seewald.html

 

http://www.romancejunkies.com/rjblog/?p=483

 

Here is a short review of THE DROWNING POOL:

 

It doesn’t happen often, but once in a while, you get the best of both worlds.  The Drowning Pool is a juicy murder mystery with an interesting romance as a side order.  It begins when a man’s body is found floating in the swimming pool of an upscale apartment complex.  There are plenty of suspects.   The victim is not well-liked and there are several people who seem to have a motive. As more and more stories of the dead man’s past are revealed, everyone looks guilty.  With all that on his plate, the lead detective, Mike Gardner, has personal problems of his own as well.  

 

Gardner is a decent man and a single dad, raising two young daughters on his own.  He is in love with a librarian at the local university, and Kim cares deeply for him, but she has a complicated past.  She’s not at all sure she is ready to commit and their relationship is never easy.  Seewald deftly weaves both story lines together, resulting in a novel filled with suspense along with the normal every-day lives of her richly-drawn characters.    

 

Copyright © 2009  Marlene Pyle

 

And another review:

REVIEW 
Kim Reynolds, a college reference librarian, suddenly finds herself embroiled in mystery when her friend Lorette dies unexpectedly. The police dismiss Lorette’s demise as a suicide because of the drugs found in her blood, but she’s been clean a long time. Then there are the literary-based death threats. Kim’s own psychic powers are matched by those of police detective Mike Gardner, and together they try to discover the circumstances behind Lorette’s death. Interesting characters abound, including Wendell Firbin, Kim’s creepy, callous library supervisor, who gets just a little too defensive every time she asks him about the Inferno Collection, the Victorian term for a set of library materials locked away from general use. Since the Inferno Collection is one of the last things Lorette asked Kim about, it just might hold the key to her death. Seewald’s take on the dark side of academia will make readers glad their course work is finished. 
- Shelley Mosley 

 

You can find Jacqueline on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1442926422&ref=search&sid=1139786050.2051333499..1

 

Here is a bio of Jacqueline I found online:

About Jacqueline


Seven of my fiction books have been published. A new paranormal mystery suspense novel THE INFERNO COLLECTION was published by Five Star/Gale in June 2007 and received an excellent review from BOOKLIST. A sequel will be published in February 2009.

My short stories, poetry and articles have been published by numerous magazines and anthologies including: SURREAL, AFTER DARK, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, PEDESTAL, VERMONT INK, DAWN SKY, MUSE IT, THE WRITING PARENT, PALACE OF REASON, THE DANA LITERARY SOCIETY JOURNAL, MINDFUL INSIGHTS, UNIVERSAL PERSONALITY, STORY STATION, WOMAN THIS MONTH and LISTEN. I have reviewed books and written articles for THE BOOK REPORT and TECHNOLOGY CONNECTION, also reviewed for LIBRARY JOURNAL and PUBLISHERS WEEKLY. 

I won FICTION UNDERGROUND's short story contest, May 2005. I also won the Zelda Contest sponsored by VERMEER Magazine for 2004, was twice a winner in the WRITER'S DIGEST Creative Writing Contest, won the Playhouse 22 Playwriting Contest, the ROMANCING THE SKYZE Short Story Contest and the GALLERIA EROS WRITERS LOUNGE FICTION CONTEST for mystery/detective fiction 2002. Another contest winning story appeared in the March 2004 issue of THE STORYTELLER.

 

 

 

Author
JacquelineSeewald
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi, Debbie,

 

Thanks for the kind words! We authors are an appreciative lot. It's always great to know that people are reading our books.

 

 I loved teaching English both at the high school and the university level, and I very much enjoyed being both an academic librarian and an educational media specialist, but I haven't regretted taking an early retirement so that I could write fulltime. It's something I always wanted to do.

 

I hope to reach a lot of people with my novels. It surprised me that THE INFERNO COLLECTION stirred as much controversy as it has. Some readers compared it to THE DA VINCI CODE. Actually, I wrote my novel before Dan Brown's book was published. So I wasn't copying him in any respect.

 

People have asked me what an inferno collection is and others have asked if one can really exist in today's society. First,

an inferno collection consists of books deemed inappropriate for the general population to read, whether considered pornographic or in bad taste. Librarians tend to think of themselves as gatekeepers. This was much more common in

the Victorian era, but inferno collections of various sorts still do exist. Witness what happened recently at Brooklyn Library where a book criticized as racist, removed from the general collection and put away in an inferno collection.

 

Another point of contention regarding THE INFERNO COLLECTION is the fact that there is a sex scene in this mystery novel.

There are also sex scenes in THE DROWNING POOL. I believe these scenes are appropriate to the novels because the hero, Mike Gardner, a police detective, and Kim Gardner, an academic librarian, are in love with each other. Can a strong mystery novel have realistic, fully developed characters? Is that allowable? Will readers object? I'd love to have your views since I am writing a third mystery novel in this series. And I believe in creating characters as real as any you will find in so-called literary novels. Your opinions valued.

 

 

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi Jacqueline! Thanks for joining us today! Would you like to post excerpts of your books? (G-rated ones -- sorry folks!) I think your comments about the books in the previous post are going to make people curious to here more.

 

I couldn' find a good bio about you online. Would you mind telling us more about yourself? 

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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Also, if I missed any blogs, interviews or reviews in my introductory posts, let me know and I'll fix that.

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carterkid
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

For me, it's all about the characters and the relationships. I thought I was writing a mystery with Finding Sarah,  my first book, but it turned into a romance. All my books are still mystery-based, but the characters insist on getting involved.  I don't have any problems with relationships in mysteries -- in fact, I gravitate toward series for exactly that reason.

Terry Odell
Romance with a Twist of Mystery
www.terryodell.com
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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Series are very popular, both in mystery and other genres. What about the rest of you? Do you prefer your mysteries to be stand-alones, or do you also like to follow the characters through several books?

 

Personally, I don't have a preference. The first mysteries I read were series (Nancy Drew, Agatha Christie's books) but I'm equally happy when the story is complete in one book. 

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dhaupt
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi Jacqueline, thanks for responding and for being here talking to us.

I always find it amazing at what causes controversy and why, it seems like this tiny spark can sometimes grow into an inferno (pardon the pun). I really loved The Inferno Collection, I was aware of banned books by certain groups etc of present and times past and was excited to find out that there is a name for them and that they still exist in certain libraries. Of course when I think of banned books I think of book burnings from individuals and bookstores and didn't have the vaguest idea that libraries kept them under lock and key.

I am a lover of mystery and thrillers and romance novels, and the reason I like your mysteries is that there is always that light at the end of the tunnel with your starring characters. The love story as well as the mystery urges me on to the next read to find out what happens next, because it's not just about "who done it", it's about the budding relationship taking place and ordinary everyday life going on and that's what cinches the deal for me.

I thought this wonderful novel was a great thriller, an exciting mystery and a tender love story. I did not think it was a romance novel as some people did. I thought all the romantic scenes in both the novels were exceptional, sensual and fit really well in the confines of the read, in other words, I got it. It made sense to me. Also you orchestrated the romance really well and the two people involved are so different and yet they fit so well. I like the fact that she is childless and he has the children, that sort of puts a new twist on the story. So keep on writing the series and I'll keep on reading to find out what next adventure Mike and Kim will find themselves on next time.

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dhaupt
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

 


becke_davis wrote:

Series are very popular, both in mystery and other genres. What about the rest of you? Do you prefer your mysteries to be stand-alones, or do you also like to follow the characters through several books?

 

Personally, I don't have a preference. The first mysteries I read were series (Nancy Drew, Agatha Christie's books) but I'm equally happy when the story is complete in one book. 


 

 

Hi Becke and btw congrats for being the winner of last's weeks Unleash your Story  for Cystic Fibrosis for the most pages written. you'll probably need a cast by the end of this month.

Now to answer your question about series vs stand a lones. 

My favorite types of reads are series or trilogies etc. only when I really fall in love with the characters. When you become intimate with the characters in a novel and they become like a friend you absolutely want to keep in contact with them, find out how they're doing and what they're going to do next. Now don't get me wrong I do like a great stand a lone novel too, but they really differ from a series in there is a definite finality to it when you close the book, you know they've either rode off in the sunset or rode off the cliff but either way you know it's over. And it's different with a series because there's either that cliff hanger like Lisa Jackson sometimes puts in (which makes me want to throttle her because now you have months to wait to find out what happened) or some little hint that the fat lady hasn't sung yet.

The very first mysteries I read were The Happy Hollisters.

Author
JacquelineSeewald
Posts: 126
Registered: ‎05-28-2009

Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi, Becke,

 

I'd be happy to post some G-rated excerpts:

 

This is from THE INFERNO COLLECTION:

 

Kim recognized the policeman who came to her door, wondered why she hadn’t realized who he was before. He was just as tall and well built, with the same calm, steady gray eyes. But he was no longer casually dressed as he had been at the library. His conservative gray suit matched his eyes, making him look more like an accountant than a law enforcement officer. His manner was friendly and not the least bit intimidating. But Kim wasn’t fooled. She studied his rugged, masculine features. This was a formidable, dangerous man, even if he chose not to emphasize those qualities.

Michael Gardner took out his shield and showed it to her. "May I come in and talk with you? I've been assigned to check into the death of Lorette Campbell. I understand you found her body and identified yourself as a friend of the deceased."

She could only manage to nod her head.  For a moment, his eyes met hers.  Then he was staring at her, connecting on a metaphysical level. She resented the intrusion into her psyche, into her very soul, and met his gaze with a defiant look. Something passed between them, a jolt of kinetic energy. She recognized it for what it was. Why should there be this potent attraction between them? She quickly looked away, confused and frightened, denying the chemistry and that something more.

He followed her into the living area and sat down on a straight-back chair, removing a small notebook and clicking a pen.

"I want to go over what you told the uniformed officers last night." Much to her relief, his tone was polite and professional. “I have some questions for you.”

She furrowed her brow. "I told them everything I knew. Why do I have to go over it again? It was awful."  Careful what you say to him. You can’t trust a policeman.

He gave her a kind look. "I don't know if you're aware of this, but your friend didn't die of natural causes”.

 

Here's a short excerpt from THE DROWNING POOL:

 

Chapter One

 

Kim Reynolds was haunted by ghosts, but only a select few knew about this since it wasn’t something she discussed openly. To most people, Kim appeared to be a perfectly normal woman. Her life was about service to the community—in her case, service to the university where she worked as an academic reference librarian at the humanities library. Wanting to pass as ordinary, she repressed her psychic sensibilities as best she could. But Mike Gardner knew and understood, because he himself had a unique awareness.

At the moment, Kim was much more aware of the living than the dead as Mike held her in his arms and proceeded to kiss her thoroughly, his body quickening in a way that sent delicious sensations rippling in waves across her skin. All he had to do was touch her and she went up in flames.

Suddenly she became aware of a persistent beeping sound. Mike groaned and cursed softly as he moved away from her. The loss of his touch left her bereft, as if part of her had been surgically removed.

Gardner.” He practically spat the word into the cell phone, then listened impatiently. “I’m off-duty. Can’t you put someone else on it?” He listened again.

Kim could tell he was withdrawing from her, moving into the orbit of his work. She rose from the couch that doubled as her bed in the small studio apartment and adjusted her clothing. When Mike finished the call, he looked over at her apologetically, his strong features solemn.

“Suspicious death,” he said without preamble. “They need me now.”

“Then I guess you’d better go,” Kim said. She tried to ignore her sense of disappointment.

“Yeah, well, I have an idea. Why don’t you come with me?”

She stared at him in amazement. “Isn’t that against procedure?”

“I’m not supposed to be on duty tonight, but I suddenly am. Besides, there’s something I’ve been meaning to talk to you about.” He sounded very serious and thoughtful.

There was no way that she was going to refuse.

“You’ll find this interesting,” he told her. “The death occurred here in La Reine Gardens.”

Kim looked at him in surprise. “Here?”

“No other.”

They left the apartment, and Mike opened the door for her to enter his black Ford on the passenger side. Mike concentrated on his driving as they moved through the garden apartment development. It was an attractive complex, brick buildings set around large courtyards, lushly landscaped, the lawns elegantly manicured. How could anything evil ever happen in such a place? And yet, according to Mike, it had.

 

Author
JacquelineSeewald
Posts: 126
Registered: ‎05-28-2009

Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

I just want to thank Debbie and Terry for their comments here. First, Debbie thanks so much for your generous comments.

People are quicker to impart criticism than praise. And we all need kind words or we get discouraged.  I'm hoping that Five Star will publish the third novel in this series in their mystery line as it too is a mystery novel but with romantic overtones. I will let you know what happens when I get the word.

 

Booklist has been very kind in their reviews of these novels and that has put them into many libraries worldwide. I hope that individual readers via Barnes and Noble will discover the novels and want to purchase them as well.

 

Terry Odell brings up an important question that we've discussed before: when is a novel mystery and when is it romance?

Of course if there's no romantic element and only mystery, this is a mute question.

 

Here are the some mystery novels I've read most recently and allow me to comment on them:

 

DEATH AND THE LIT CHICK by G.M. Malliet is in my opinion an excellent read. The author won Malic Domestic last year with her first novel DEATH OF A COZY WRITER. These are British cozies written with wit and a touch of romance.

 

Janet Evanovich's latest, FINGER LICKIN' FIFTEEN, is humorous and brings back her familiar characters. I've read each of her novels and enjoyed them immensely. And yes, we do have romance here as well.

 

THE GOOD HUSBAND OF ZEBRA DRIVE is a wonderful book by Alexander McCall Smith. I love The Number One Ladies' Detective Agency series. They are quality books, more literary fiction than mystery, but a great read. Smith has a wonderful sense of humor as well.

 

I'm going to add to this another novel that I just finished reading: A DEADLY HABIT by Andrea Sisco. She puts the fun in funny. This is straight mystery with a touch of romance. A first novel, I expect there will be more.

 

Now for so-called romantic suspense:

 

I have always been a big fan of Nora Roberts and she consistently delivers a balance of romance and mystery. But in romantic suspense the mystery is less important than the romance and is often a means to an end. I last read her novel TRIBUTE and enjoyed it much more than the film version.

 

RUNNING HOT by Jayne Ann Krentz is a great paranormal romantic suspense/mystery novel. She  is a favorite writer of mine because she consistently turns out books of quality.

THE PERFECT POISON by Jayne Ann Krentz is written under her Amanda Quick nom de plume and is historical romantic suspense but still an arcane society mystery. Another great read.

 

I would call both of my Five Star novels, romantic mysteries, not romantic suspense. The mystery remains more important than the romance. However, creating realistic characters with real lives was and is essential for me.

 

 

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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Thanks so much for posting the excerpts, Jacqueline! What a great idea, too, to talk about books you've been reading. "What are you reading now"  is one of the most popular threads at the Mystery Book Club, and I'm always fascinated to see what others are reading. I see we share some similar tastes in books!

 

Debbie - Wow, I didn't realize Unleash Your Story had publicized that! I was excited because I won a free paperback. I'm not surprised I hit the top word count - I'm writing a new story, revising an old one, and I'm practically buried in garden writing right now. Luckily, I'm including both fiction and non-fiction word counts. So the rest of you know what we're talking about, Debbie and I are both on Michelle Buonfiglio's team in a cystic fibrosis fundraiser called Unleash Your Story. Michelle blogged about it -- we have reading and/or writing goals for the month, and we're raising money for a good cause, too.

 

Back to Jacqueline - I put a link to your Facebook page but forgot to check for Twitter, MySpace, etc. Do you have other places people can follow you?

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IonaMcAvoy
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi Jacqueline,

 

I am intrigued at your ability to catch the reader so quickly, even with the titles of your books, I'm drawn to them. Did you come up with the titles before, during or after you wrote the stories?  I usually get my titles during or after, but yours are such great hooks you have me curious.


Thanks,


Iona McAvoy

JADEAD, short story found in anthology:

A Box of Texas Chocolates

L&L Dreamspell, publishers

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becke_davis
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi Iona, and welcome to the Mystery Book Club! Your question raises another point -- did you come up with these titles yourself, Jacqueline, or did the publisher tweak your original titles?

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BimpO
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi Jackie!

 

I'm surprised that more librarians and libraries don't stand as main characters or settings in novels. Can you share with us one of your favorite library novels - besides your own!

 

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IonaMcAvoy
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Thanks for the welcome. I'll have to visit more now that I know about this.  And like your additional queries to Jacqueline about the titles.  I came up with JADEAD for the short story after I wrote it. But I have a YA series I'm working on and have that title, as I did for the children's book I'm editing and hoping to get published about 9/11.  Thos all came first.  I just loved the titles of her books so am curious as to the answer!

 

I'll have to add photo and such when home, just taking a much needed work break here. Now back to the grind. And not even the coffee grind <G>  

 

Howls, 

 

Iona

Author
JacquelineSeewald
Posts: 126
Registered: ‎05-28-2009

Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi, Iona, it's nice to meet you online! You and Becke both asked about how I got my titles. Five Star, the publisher for both

THE INFERNO COLLECTION and THE DROWNING POOL, didn't change my titles.

 

The idea for THE INFERNO COLLECTION started when I was taking my second graduate degree at Rutgers, this one in library science. We had a seminar and one of the lecturers was the head of reference at Princeton University. He gave an eloquent lecture on the history of inferno collections. I was blown away by it and took lots of notes. It seemed like a great frame for a mystery novel. So I did considerable research--easy for me because I was working in the reference department of Alexander Library at Rutgers at the time. The novel began to take form. But even after it was written, I rewrote it any number of times. I did my best to avoid info dumping. I literally cut away over one-third of the novel so that the pace wouldn't be slowed down by too much introspection and description. It was painful but I wanted Inferno to read like a thriller and that means providing a fast pace.

 

THE DROWNING POOL actually started out as THE DROWNED MAN, but I realized that because there are actually two different drowning pools in the novel that The Drowning Pool was symbolically a more appropriate title. Too bad other writers have used the same title but that can't be helped. My next novel, TEA LEAVES AND TAROT CARDS hasn't been used by anyone else as far as I know.

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JacquelineSeewald
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Hi, B,

 

Nice to meet you!

 

I'm embarrassed to tell you that I don't know of another librarian heroine, at least none that I've read about. I'm sure I could find out about them on google though. Love googling! I find out so much.

 

Jacqueline

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JacquelineSeewald
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Re: Visiting Tuesday Author: Jacqueline Seewald

Becke,

 

In answer to your question, I have not as yet done a website or a personal blog. I realize that these are things I should be doing and will have to consider for the future. I'm certainly one of the few writers not to put myself out there in cyberspace. And it's a good thing to do. So today's experience is much appreciated. Unfortunately, I do tend to be rather shy.