Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. On May 1, we’re saying goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Contributor
Denisewithsabrina
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎07-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Fricka,

 

I love it! No, I didn’t know that Cincinnati was such a pig-friendly town. I’ve never been there. I’ll ask my husband if he does though. He worked there for a few months before we got married.

 

Yes! Thank you for solving the mystery for me. Yesterday as I posted my notes I thought and thought about where I had read of Archie before, and it was annoying because I knew I had read it many times but couldn’t remember. It was Archie Goodwin. Nice chap. He doesn’t take things too seriously, but does not have Bertie’s talent of getting into trouble.

 

By the way, every time I read Rex Stout’s books I get a little depressed because it feels like torture to read about Fritz’s cooking and not be able to taste it. Rather nice to have a personal French cook! And it’s easy to understand why Nero Wolfe is so particular about leaving his home and going somewhere else to eat. From all the books I’ve read, he’s been out only in Too Many Cooks. But then again there was very good food involved.

 

 

Too Many Cooks (Nero Wolfe Series)

  

 

Which reminds me, I haven’t had lunch yet.

Be good,

 

Denise.
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Come to think of it, I haven't had lunch either.

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

I just returned from shopping at the local mall, where I had a Quiche Muffin for lunch! I was thinking of Avery Aames' new book as I was eating it, too!

Hmmm. Somehow, those porkers do not look fat enough to be the Empress, becke! But they are still funny, anyway.

BTW, Nero Wolfe DOES leave the brownstone rather more often than one would think when reading that Archie proclaims NW never does. He did, for example, in Black Orchid, where he had to go see the hybrid orchid created by a rival orchid grower at a Flower Show, in Some Buried Caesar, where he and Archie were on their way to a flower show, and had a flat (or some other car trouble, I can't remember the exact cause of the problem). It's one of my favorite NW/AG books, because the two are in the country, and in order to get to a farmhouse in the distance to make a phone call, they have to cross a pasture which, incidentally has a bull in it! Archie makes a run for it and leaps over the fence, but when he goes to look for Wolfe, he is on the top of a big rock in the middle of the pen, posing, as Archie puts it, as a immobile statue. Too funny! It's also where Archie meets Lily Rowan, another reason why  it is one of my all time favorite Nero Wolfe novels.  Then, of course, there's the time when Nero  has to go on the run, as Zeck is after him, with murder in mind, and Nero goes out of the brownstone and quits his business, leaving Archie in charge, in In The Best Families.

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

I'm going to see if I have a copy of Uncle Fred in Springtime. If not, I've got to buy a copy!

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

I read that(Uncle Fred in Springtime)  recently, and it was very funny! You won't be sorry you read it, becke!

BTW, Denise, sorry, I had a memory lapse in my last post and could not remember your name! Forgive me! I guess it's my brain's way of telling me it's time to EAT! Like you(I think it was you), it's always tantalizing to read about the wonderful meals Fritz is preparing for Nero! It makes sense that he would not WANT to leave the Brownstone, but we know he does, several times. He's also friends with Marko Vuckik(hope I am spelling that right) who runs Rusterman's Restaurant, and the implication is that that he occasionally visits Marko there.

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Reader 2
NookaholicIL
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎07-03-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Hello Mystery Lovers!! This is my first visit to a BN book club. I, like many of you, have read mysteries all of my life. As a child, I recall Nancy Drew, Trixie Beldon, Encyclopedia Brown, and Harriet the Spy. As I got farther along in grade school, I remember checking out all of the Agatha Christie, Phyllis Whitney, and Victoria Holt books I could find at the local library. Now, I love cozies and series. I love any mystery with a cat in it or knitting/crocheting being part of the story. I just read the entire Evanovich numbers series this spring and summer and thought they were hilariously funny (You go, Grandma Mazur!). I love Patricia Cornwell, Jeffrey Deaver, Jonathan Kellerman (especially his earliest novels), James Patterson's Alex Delaware novels, Valerie Wolzien, Leslie Meier, Lillian Braun Jackson, Sue Grafton, Lawrence Block, and JoAnn Fluke. I'm currently reading the first in a series of 2 books by Kate Carlisle titled Homicide in Hardcover (great book for bibliophiles and people interested in old books). OK, well, that's probably more than anyone's interested in knowing, but there you have it!!
Contributor
Denisewithsabrina
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎07-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Hey Jim,

 

Funny enough, my favorite from Christie’s books, by far, isn’t either a Poirot or Miss Marple mystery. It’s And then There Were None (AKA Ten Little Niggers, AKA Ten Little Indians). It was the very first I read and it stayed with me. I remember having this eerie feeling of incoming doom throughout the entire book, always wondering who was going to be next. And I could not see how she was going to explain it all in the end. It so happens that I just read on The Secret Notebooks yesterday that Christie had proposed herself to write it especially because of the challenge. I started to read her autobiography when I was a teenager, but thinking that it wasn’t nearly as fun as her mysteries I put it aside after just a few pages. I have repented since then, though, and I plan to read it soon. Anyway, Curran added an excerpt of it where she comments: ‘I had written the book Ten Little Niggers because it was so difficult to do that the idea fascinated me. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer becoming obvious. I wrote the book after a great amount of planning.’

 

Among my favorite Poirots, I’d say Peril at End House, Sad Cypress, Taken at the Flood, The Crooked House, Death in the Clouds. As you can see I can barely choose. Oh, and featuring Ariadne Oliver, Halloween Party.

 

As for Miss Marple, definitely The Murder at the Vicarage, Sleeping Murder and Nemesis.

I also love Tommy and Tuppence’s By the Pricking of My Thumbs.

 

My favorites also include The Seven Dials Mystery, with Inspector Battle. I recall enjoying The Secret of Chimneys very much, although I must read it again since I don’t really remember it – which it’s a good think, it means I get to enjoy it again.

 

And at last but not least, Death Comes at The End and The Man in the Brown Suit.

 

Uff! You must be exhausted after reading about my never-ending list (I know I am after writing it). I am sure you expected a much shorter answer. The list would probably go on if some of the titles hadn’t changed so much when translated to Portuguese. Sometimes it makes it impossible to guess which book it is. SO annoying. But there’s one more reason for me to keep on my rereading them.

 

I can never decide if I like Poirot better or Miss Marple. I guess it depends on the novel. The amazing thing is how Christie was able to pull off so many different detectives with completely diverse idiosyncrasies. It’s hard to guess what goes on Poirot’s little brain cells; on the other hand, you always think you can almost guess what is in Miss Marple’s mind while she is busy finding parallels for everything and everyone at St Mary Mead, but we’ll be invariably proven wrong in the end.

 

Golly! What an Essay! I apologize, but one of the hardest things for me is to economize words when writing (and if you knew me, you’d find that when talking too – I’m quite a chatterbox, as if you can’t tell by now.)

 

I love traveling too. But somehow I feel it’s appropriate to leave this topic for a later time… Hope you enjoy your weekend!

Denise.
Contributor
Denisewithsabrina
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎07-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Hey Fricka,

 

There’s nothing to apologize for! Half of the time I can’t remember my own name, especially when my daughter starts to call “Mommy!  Mommy!  Mommy!”…  And by the way, I happen to have three sisters, and my mother would call all of us by all of our names, no matter if fitting or not. Sometimes she would even throw in one of the dog’s names, meaning to call us girls.  

 

Anyway, it was nice enough (more than) that you took time to write me a reply.

I haven’t been as an avid Rex Stout reader as I have been of Christie’s, but after reading your post I remembered I did read Some Buried Caesar. And poor Nero Wolfe thought that then indignity of riding a car was all the indignity he was about to endure! As for The Black Orchid and In the Best of Families, I am not sure if I read them or not. I need to check. I do remember there was a restaurant that Wolfe considered worthy of him being a patron of.

 

My sister Milene is addicted to Rex Stout’s books and she has a bunch of them. Maybe I’ll read one or two while I’m in Brazil during the next few weeks.

 

But one thing intrigues me most of all. A Quiche Muffin?? Maybe it’s my low carb diet making me miss my carbs like crazy, but oh-my-gosh do I feel like trying one right now! Is it worthy of a visit to Cincinnati?  

 

As for inventive dishes, last weekend we were at this English Pub and I had a Scotch Egg, which is a hard boiled egg coated in ground sausage and breaded, then deep fried. I know it sounds weird; well, it is weird, but it is SO good! And I don’t even like hard-boiled eggs that much.

 

Maybe Becke is familiar with it.

 

By the way, Becke, your Peanut butter and Jelly sandwich made me smile. So American too! Not what we usually sample when hanging out with you. As for me, I don’t think I have ever had one. I’m not too fond of Peanut Butter. I would lean more towards a regular Butter and Jelly sandwich myself.

 

Oh-oh! I’m hungry again. Better avoid too many of these gastronomical discussions!

 

Well, maybe not before salivating over some Cold Lobster Salad Bertie had at Blandings once…

 

You guys be good,

Denise.
Contributor
Denisewithsabrina
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎07-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!


 


I don’t remember if I have read any books featuring Psmith. I would say no, but I have to check.

 

You know, Becke, it would be interesting if while I’m in Brazil I compare both versions of Uncle Fred in the Springtime, in English and Portuguese. I’ll let you know my findings after my investigation is over. And you are right, Wodehouse books are not what you would call easy reading for someone whose English is a second language! But I can say that my vocabulary improved tremendously after that.

 

 

(Becke) I remember reading about that guy, but I don't remember the reading two pages at once part. Aak! That gives me a headache, just thinking of it.


I know, it gives me the jitters too. Sounds exhausting! But think about it Becke, if you could read like that, your reading quota would increase and you would average two books a day instead, as if one a day wasn’t already impressive enough.

 

I used to be able to read like that (or almost) but that lasted only during my teenage years and through college (I went to Law School in Brazil). My reading average started to decline after I got married (my husband didn’t like me to read in bed, the light kept him awake). It got even worse after I had Sabrina. I guess one gets busy!

 

At least now I got this book light that my husband approves of, so I can get my late night reading hours in again while he happily snores away. Plus, I have now enough book referrals to last me a lifetime!

 

As for us being Keyboard Pals, I have also made real friends of people I used to correspond with, and when you say ‘I think that might come easier to readers and writers because a fine line separates our imaginary worlds from the "real" world’, I couldn’t agree more. You described me right there – indeed a fine line, but still so much more colorful and interesting!

 

I’ve spent a fine week, talking to you guys.

 

A lovely weekend to you,

 

 

 

PS: Oh, here are the links for the spouse-approved book lights:

 

 

Lightwedge Original Book Light (Ocean)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lightwedge Paperback Book Light (Translucent Ocean)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lightwedge Booklight with Gift Bag

  

 

Denise.
Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 


NookaholicIL wrote:
Hello Mystery Lovers!! This is my first visit to a BN book club. I, like many of you, have read mysteries all of my life. As a child, I recall Nancy Drew, Trixie Beldon, Encyclopedia Brown, and Harriet the Spy. As I got farther along in grade school, I remember checking out all of the Agatha Christie, Phyllis Whitney, and Victoria Holt books I could find at the local library. Now, I love cozies and series. I love any mystery with a cat in it or knitting/crocheting being part of the story. I just read the entire Evanovich numbers series this spring and summer and thought they were hilariously funny (You go, Grandma Mazur!). I love Patricia Cornwell, Jeffrey Deaver, Jonathan Kellerman (especially his earliest novels), James Patterson's Alex Delaware novels, Valerie Wolzien, Leslie Meier, Lillian Braun Jackson, Sue Grafton, Lawrence Block, and JoAnn Fluke. I'm currently reading the first in a series of 2 books by Kate Carlisle titled Homicide in Hardcover (great book for bibliophiles and people interested in old books). OK, well, that's probably more than anyone's interested in knowing, but there you have it!!

 

 

Hi Nook - thanks for joining us! I'm a big fan of Kate Carlisle's - she's been a featured guest here before (just search her name on the upper right to bring up previous discussions). I've read most of the authors you've mentioned - great choices!

 

Stick around and we'll all do our best to introduce you to lots of other authors, too. Libby Fischer Hellmann is visiting right now, and on Monday Jennifer McMahon will be joining us. And in August we have a Month of Suspense & Thrillers, with a different author visiting every day.

 

Thanks so much for joining us!

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 


Denisewithsabrina wrote:

Hey Jim,

 

Funny enough, my favorite from Christie’s books, by far, isn’t either a Poirot or Miss Marple mystery. It’s And then There Were None (AKA Ten Little Niggers, AKA Ten Little Indians). It was the very first I read and it stayed with me. I remember having this eerie feeling of incoming doom throughout the entire book, always wondering who was going to be next. And I could not see how she was going to explain it all in the end. It so happens that I just read on The Secret Notebooks yesterday that Christie had proposed herself to write it especially because of the challenge. I started to read her autobiography when I was a teenager, but thinking that it wasn’t nearly as fun as her mysteries I put it aside after just a few pages. I have repented since then, though, and I plan to read it soon. Anyway, Curran added an excerpt of it where she comments: ‘I had written the book Ten Little Niggers because it was so difficult to do that the idea fascinated me. Ten people had to die without it becoming ridiculous or the murderer becoming obvious. I wrote the book after a great amount of planning.’

 

Among my favorite Poirots, I’d say Peril at End House, Sad Cypress, Taken at the Flood, The Crooked House, Death in the Clouds. As you can see I can barely choose. Oh, and featuring Ariadne Oliver, Halloween Party.

 

As for Miss Marple, definitely The Murder at the Vicarage, Sleeping Murder and Nemesis.

I also love Tommy and Tuppence’s By the Pricking of My Thumbs.

 

My favorites also include The Seven Dials Mystery, with Inspector Battle. I recall enjoying The Secret of Chimneys very much, although I must read it again since I don’t really remember it – which it’s a good think, it means I get to enjoy it again.

 

And at last but not least, Death Comes at The End and The Man in the Brown Suit.

 

Uff! You must be exhausted after reading about my never-ending list (I know I am after writing it). I am sure you expected a much shorter answer. The list would probably go on if some of the titles hadn’t changed so much when translated to Portuguese. Sometimes it makes it impossible to guess which book it is. SO annoying. But there’s one more reason for me to keep on my rereading them.

 

I can never decide if I like Poirot better or Miss Marple. I guess it depends on the novel. The amazing thing is how Christie was able to pull off so many different detectives with completely diverse idiosyncrasies. It’s hard to guess what goes on Poirot’s little brain cells; on the other hand, you always think you can almost guess what is in Miss Marple’s mind while she is busy finding parallels for everything and everyone at St Mary Mead, but we’ll be invariably proven wrong in the end.

 

Golly! What an Essay! I apologize, but one of the hardest things for me is to economize words when writing (and if you knew me, you’d find that when talking too – I’m quite a chatterbox, as if you can’t tell by now.)

 

I love traveling too. But somehow I feel it’s appropriate to leave this topic for a later time… Hope you enjoy your weekend!


 

 

Denise, if you scroll down the main page you'll see a thread called Six for Christie - it's an old thread we started some time back, but it just keeps going on and on. We talk about all kinds of Christie topics there. Check it out!

 

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 


Denisewithsabrina wrote:

Hey Fricka,

 

There’s nothing to apologize for! Half of the time I can’t remember my own name, especially when my daughter starts to call “Mommy!  Mommy!  Mommy!”…  And by the way, I happen to have three sisters, and my mother would call all of us by all of our names, no matter if fitting or not. Sometimes she would even throw in one of the dog’s names, meaning to call us girls.  

 

Anyway, it was nice enough (more than) that you took time to write me a reply.

I haven’t been as an avid Rex Stout reader as I have been of Christie’s, but after reading your post I remembered I did read Some Buried Caesar. And poor Nero Wolfe thought that then indignity of riding a car was all the indignity he was about to endure! As for The Black Orchid and In the Best of Families, I am not sure if I read them or not. I need to check. I do remember there was a restaurant that Wolfe considered worthy of him being a patron of.

 

My sister Milene is addicted to Rex Stout’s books and she has a bunch of them. Maybe I’ll read one or two while I’m in Brazil during the next few weeks.

 

But one thing intrigues me most of all. A Quiche Muffin?? Maybe it’s my low carb diet making me miss my carbs like crazy, but oh-my-gosh do I feel like trying one right now! Is it worthy of a visit to Cincinnati?  

 

As for inventive dishes, last weekend we were at this English Pub and I had a Scotch Egg, which is a hard boiled egg coated in ground sausage and breaded, then deep fried. I know it sounds weird; well, it is weird, but it is SO good! And I don’t even like hard-boiled eggs that much.

 

Maybe Becke is familiar with it.

 

By the way, Becke, your Peanut butter and Jelly sandwich made me smile. So American too! Not what we usually sample when hanging out with you. As for me, I don’t think I have ever had one. I’m not too fond of Peanut Butter. I would lean more towards a regular Butter and Jelly sandwich myself.

 

Oh-oh! I’m hungry again. Better avoid too many of these gastronomical discussions!

 

Well, maybe not before salivating over some Cold Lobster Salad Bertie had at Blandings once…

 

You guys be good,


 

 

Oh, yum - Scotch Eggs with Branston pickle - those and Ploughman's lunches were staples of pub food when I lived in the London area. My husband tells me the pubs are very Americanized now, and Indian food is easier to find than fish and chips. I can get Branston here now, but I've yet to see Scotch eggs in this country. Just as well - I don't think they are exactly low calorie!

 

True, peanut butter and jelly isn't our normal fare here. I'll see if I can find a picture of a Scotch egg for everyone.

 

Moderator
becke_davis
Posts: 35,693
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 

Psmith, Journalist 
Denisewithsabrina wrote:


 


I don’t remember if I have read any books featuring Psmith. I would say no, but I have to check.

 

 

Leave It to Psmith 

 

 

You know, Becke, it would be interesting if while I’m in Brazil I compare both versions of Uncle Fred in the Springtime, in English and Portuguese. I’ll let you know my findings after my investigation is over. And you are right, Wodehouse books are not what you would call easy reading for someone whose English is a second language! But I can say that my vocabulary improved tremendously after that.

 

I know what you mean. I took four years of French and was pretty fluent for awhile, but if you don't use a language you tend to forget it. So when I was in Paris years ago I bought a couple Agatha Christie books in French - The Tuesday Club Murders was one of them. I thought if I tried to read them, I'd remember enough of the story to figure out the words I didn't know. It sort of worked, but it was a hard slog.

 

 

(Becke) I remember reading about that guy, but I don't remember the reading two pages at once part. Aak! That gives me a headache, just thinking of it.


I know, it gives me the jitters too. Sounds exhausting! But think about it Becke, if you could read like that, your reading quota would increase and you would average two books a day instead, as if one a day wasn’t already impressive enough.

 

Sometimes I can fly through two books in a day, but then if I have a lot of writing deadlines, my reading goes way down. I figure it still averages about a book a day.

 

I used to be able to read like that (or almost) but that lasted only during my teenage years and through college (I went to Law School in Brazil). My reading average started to decline after I got married (my husband didn’t like me to read in bed, the light kept him awake). It got even worse after I had Sabrina. I guess one gets busy!

 

At least now I got this book light that my husband approves of, so I can get my late night reading hours in again while he happily snores away. Plus, I have now enough book referrals to last me a lifetime!

 

My husband and I each have a bedside lamp, so his side is dark and mine stays light into the wee hours. I'm a night owl, so it's a good thing a little light doesn't keep him awake. I do have a reading light, too - tried to find a picture but maybe it's not being made anymore.

 

 

As for us being Keyboard Pals, I have also made real friends of people I used to correspond with, and when you say ‘I think that might come easier to readers and writers because a fine line separates our imaginary worlds from the "real" world’, I couldn’t agree more. You described me right there – indeed a fine line, but still so much more colorful and interesting!

 

I’ve spent a fine week, talking to you guys.

 

A lovely weekend to you,

 

It's been fun talking to you, too - and, as you can see, it's a very friendly crowd here!

 

 

PS: Oh, here are the links for the spouse-approved book lights:

 

 

Lightwedge Original Book Light (Ocean)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lightwedge Paperback Book Light (Translucent Ocean)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lightwedge Booklight with Gift Bag

  

 


 

 

Author
LoisWinston
Posts: 208
Registered: ‎06-09-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 


becke_davis wrote:

 

Lois - It's showing up when I edit the post, but when I publish it, it's chopped off. I just inserted the YouTube embed code - do I need to tweak something in the code? Sorry - I'm relatively clueless about HTML - I know just enough to be dangerous.

 


 

 

Becke, you probably know a great deal more than I do about such things, but I had the same problem when I went to upload the video to my blog. Rayna Vause, Goddess of All Things Techno, told me how to manipulate the code:

 

"tweak the video embed code slightly. It's really simple.  In the last line of coding before the tags that read </embed></object> you'll see the width and height settings. I'd suggest setting width to 200 and height to 180. You can adjust it larger or small from there just by changing those setting."

 

This was for the sidebar of the blog. You'll probably want to make the numbers larger than that for this site but slightly smaller than what you now have. Just remember to maintain the ratio as much as possible. 

Lois Winston
http://www.loiswinston.com
http://www.anastasiapollack.blogspot.com
Author
LoisWinston
Posts: 208
Registered: ‎06-09-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

 


I remember I really liked Pigs Have Wings. And did you know one of the mottos of the town I live in is: Cincinnati, Where Pigs Fly?

 

 


 

I don't know if it's still in print, but several years ago there was a coffee table book published with all the photos of the decorated pigs that were done for Cincinnati. I believe it was called Pigopolis. I bought it as a birthday gift for a friend who collected pig figurines.

 

Lois Winston
http://www.loiswinston.com
http://www.anastasiapollack.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Denise, I got that Quiche Muffin at  the Paradise Bakery that is located in the PV mall here in Phoenix, so I would not advise going to Cincinatti in search of one!Hee hee! Actually, it was more like a small, muffin sized, crustless quiche. No bacon, either, but the cheese, eggs, and spinach  were baked to perfection! I had headed to the food court in the mall, as I had been doing some shopping at the Macy's store there. It is having a 50% discount on certain sale items. I had had my eyes on a dragonfly ring by 1928, and I found one for $7.00! I went back yesterday to get a set of silver bangle bracelets for my sister-in-law, whose birthday is in September, and got a set for $15. So it was kind of like Christmas in July shopping for me. The only drawback (or maybe not!) is that Macy's does not carry a line of books, or I would have checked that out as well!

And welcome to our newest member here--rats!  ANOTHER name I've forgotten! This is getting to be tooo embarrassing!

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
Posts: 2,230
Registered: ‎05-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

NookaholicIL, sorry about that, and welcome to our book club here! Are the last two letters in your pen name indicative of your home state, or something else? I also grew up reading the Nancy Drew mysteries, and sneaked into my brother's collection of the Hardy Boys and Alfred Hitchcock's Three Investigators series as well. Later, I discovered Victoria Holt, as you did, and absolutely loved her books! I still think the first two books of hers I read, Bride of Pendorric, and Mistress of Mellyn, are my favorites of her books. I think I've read all the Agatha Christie Poirot and Marple books. I also like her Parker Pyne and Satterwaithe/Harley Quinn books....Since then, my list of favorite mystery authors has expanded, and while I don't want to be too long-winded here, I do have a soft spot for all the Dorothy L.Sayers mysteries. Her Lord Peter Wimsey books are my favorites, but I've also read some of her Montague Egg stories and they are pretty good, too. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler, Erle Stanley Garner --I've gone through every book of theirs I could get my hands on. The two Peters women--Elizabeth and Ellis, have written some of the best mysteries ever, IMHO. Margaret Frazer's Sister Frevisse mysteries, and Peter Tremayne's Sister Fidelma novels are great medieval mysteries. So are those by Ariana Franklin, whose Mistress of the Art of Death series is also set in the middle ages of England, in the time of King Henry II....think that is enough for now!

 

becke, that Scotch egg looks DANGEROUS! I would probably eat the inside, but give the outer part a miss on account of potential heart burn. Thanks for those great weekend greetings--very colorful and fun!

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Contributor
MyLibraryCardWoreOut
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-21-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

I know this might be a little off topic but I found these really cute videos by the muppets. One of them was for valentines day. It was really cute and I just have to share them. 

On my blog I do Fun Day Friday and I shared the Ode to Joy on Friday and the other one on 4th of July. Enjoy

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpcUxwpOQ_A&feature=player_embedded

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDA9NbPAK8o&feature=player_embedded

 

Enjoy.

MyLibraryCardWoreOut

www.mylibrarycardworeout.wordpress.com

 

-MyLibraryCardWoreOut
Author
WS_Gager
Posts: 61
Registered: ‎11-08-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Welcome to the Mystery Book Club - Introduce Yourself!

Will do but need a rainy day. My son is helping me but if the sun is shining then he can't be at the computer. Summer is all about being outdoors. Don't know where he got that from! I'm chained to the computer and need to follow him out more often!