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Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Maxcat, thanks for the encouragement to read The Cuckoo's Calling. I just finished reading it, and WHAT a climax! Kind of a combination of a drawing room confrontation out of Agatha Christie and a thriller of a fight scene! WOW!

HOWEVER, in the interests of full disclosure, I think I should mention to my Mystery Forum colleagues

that  the book is full of foul language--the "F" bomb is used so much it almost becomes banal. I admit one reason I did not read A Casual Vacancy is that I read reviews which discussed the swear language used in that book. I normally do not choose to read books which are filled with filthy language, but I did make an exception for this one. Still not happy with all the profanity and hope maybe Rowling will get to the point where she does not equate "realistic" dialogue with an overabundance of swear words.

Now I am reading Buried in a Bog by Sheila Connolly.

 

 

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
Inspired Wordsmith
basson_mommy12
Posts: 743
Registered: ‎05-27-2008
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Re: What are you reading right now?

I am reading

The Ocean at the End of the Lane after a "quick" re-read of

A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet Series #1)  

"The Answer to the Great Question of ... Life, the Universe and Everything ... (is) 42." -- Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

Ruth W.
Grand Rapids, MI
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maxcat
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Fricka, sorry about the foul language. It almost comes natural anymore in modern writings. I guess Rowling decided she can write adult books and was afraid that not using the language might make her think she's  writing the Harry Potter way. Oh well, but it was a good mystery!

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?


basson_mommy12 wrote:

I am reading

The Ocean at the End of the Lane after a "quick" re-read of

A Wrinkle in Time (Time Quintet Series #1)  


All of those are wonderful books!

 

I just finally finished Scorched! I started it awhile ago but didn't have much reading time.

 

Scorched (Tracers Series #6)  

Inspired Wordsmith
basson_mommy12
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Re: What are you reading right now?


maxcat wrote:

Fricka, sorry about the foul language. It almost comes natural anymore in modern writings. I guess Rowling decided she can write adult books and was afraid that not using the language might make her think she's  writing the Harry Potter way. Oh well, but it was a good mystery!


This is pure speculation, but do you think it's a cultural thing? Americans are so puritanical compared to Europeans and Brits. I think culturally, foul language is far more acceptable there than it is in the US.

"The Answer to the Great Question of ... Life, the Universe and Everything ... (is) 42." -- Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

Ruth W.
Grand Rapids, MI
Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?


basson_mommy12 wrote:

maxcat wrote:

Fricka, sorry about the foul language. It almost comes natural anymore in modern writings. I guess Rowling decided she can write adult books and was afraid that not using the language might make her think she's  writing the Harry Potter way. Oh well, but it was a good mystery!


This is pure speculation, but do you think it's a cultural thing? Americans are so puritanical compared to Europeans and Brits. I think culturally, foul language is far more acceptable there than it is in the US.


I hadn't thought of it like that. Of course, the British authors I usually read are the mystery mavens like Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers, so of course there is no gratuitous foul language in their books. Funny that the Americans are thought to be "purer" in language use than the Brits, too, as there are certainly a bunch of potty-mouthed entertainers and book authors who are American. I just know that I don't approve--since as an English teacher, I know there are plenty of ways to insult someone or express oneself without resorting to foul language. That's my two knuts' worth.

Now I am reading a really engrossing mystery, The Cat Sitter's Cradle. It's the book that the late Blaize Clement left unfinished, and that her son John completed. THANK YOU, JOHN! It's a great book. I am loving, absolutely reveling in all the details from previous Dixie Hemingway books that crop up in this one. I will probably finish reading it tonight, if I don't get interrupted!

The Cat Sitter's Cradle (Dixie Hemingway Series #8)  

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
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Re: What are you reading right now?

[ Edited ]

I'm reading Run! by Patricia Wentworth (a Got Books selection).  I've never read anything by her, although I have heard that her Miss Silver mysteries are very good.  This one is not Miss Silver (nor another one that Becke sent me, which I will probably read next), but I am enjoying it very much!

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?


dulcinea3 wrote:

I'm reading Run! by Patricia Wentworth (a Got Books selection).  I've never read anything by her, although I have heard that her Miss Silver mysteries are very good.  This one is not Miss Silver (nor another one that Becke sent me, which I will probably read next), but I am enjoying it very much!


I've read all of her books and some were extremely hard to find. I liked them all - some more than others, of course, but all were worth reading.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Just finished reading Louise Penny's latest, How the Light Gets In. Fabulous! Fantastic!

How the Light Gets In (Armand Gamache Series #9)  

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?


Fricka wrote:

Just finished reading Louise Penny's latest, How the Light Gets In. Fabulous! Fantastic!

How the Light Gets In (Armand Gamache Series #9)  


That's next up for me. I just finished this one - I liked it a lot!

 

The Cuckoo's Calling  

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dulcinea3
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Re: What are you reading right now?


becke_davis wrote:

dulcinea3 wrote:

I'm reading Run! by Patricia Wentworth (a Got Books selection).  I've never read anything by her, although I have heard that her Miss Silver mysteries are very good.  This one is not Miss Silver (nor another one that Becke sent me, which I will probably read next), but I am enjoying it very much!


I've read all of her books and some were extremely hard to find. I liked them all - some more than others, of course, but all were worth reading.


I finished Run!, and it was great!  Tonight I've started the other one, Dark Threat (aka Pilgrim's Rest), and find that it is a Miss Silver mystery, after all.  I remember mentioning the cover illustration when I received this book - there are two women in low-cut dresses, and someone stamped '10 cents' (only with the cents sign, which I can't find on my keyboard) right across each of their chests!  I figure they must be cheap women - LOL! :smileylol:

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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?

[ Edited ]

dulcinea3 wrote:

becke_davis wrote:

dulcinea3 wrote:

I'm reading Run! by Patricia Wentworth (a Got Books selection).  I've never read anything by her, although I have heard that her Miss Silver mysteries are very good.  This one is not Miss Silver (nor another one that Becke sent me, which I will probably read next), but I am enjoying it very much!


I've read all of her books and some were extremely hard to find. I liked them all - some more than others, of course, but all were worth reading.


I finished Run!, and it was great!  Tonight I've started the other one, Dark Threat (aka Pilgrim's Rest), and find that it is a Miss Silver mystery, after all.  I remember mentioning the cover illustration when I received this book - there are two women in low-cut dresses, and someone stamped '10 cents' (only with the cents sign, which I can't find on my keyboard) right across each of their chests!  I figure they must be cheap women - LOL! :smileylol:


I found a few of her books at a bargain books place a few years ago. If I remember correctly, the one with William Smith in the title was especially good. There's even one that features a Loch Ness type monster! (Written before Nessie became famous, which intrigues me...) 

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Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Just finished reading Buried in a Bog by Sheila Connolly. I've enjoyed reading her Apple Orchard and Children's Museum novels, and this is hopefully the first in a new series that will be set in Ireland.

Buried in a Bog  

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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dulcinea3
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Re: What are you reading right now?

A Presumption of Death  

 

Finished Dark Threat, and enjoyed it very much!  BTW, the cover with the low-cut-dressed women had very little to do with the story - the two characters they may have represented would never have been dressed like that!

 

Now I am finally getting around to A Presumption of Death, by Jill Paton Walsh, based on Dorothy L. Sayers.  In the first book, Thrones, Dominations, Paton Walsh had completed one of Sayers' own novels; in this one, she based it on some notes that Sayers had made for how she envisioned Lord Peter, Harriet, etc., during the years of WWII.  I also have the third, The Attenbury Emeralds, which I believe is based on a case mentioned in the Sayers novels, so I hope to go on to that one after this.

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Re: What are you reading right now?

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becke_davis
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Re: What are you reading right now?


dulcinea3 wrote:

A Presumption of Death  

 

Finished Dark Threat, and enjoyed it very much!  BTW, the cover with the low-cut-dressed women had very little to do with the story - the two characters they may have represented would never have been dressed like that!

 

Now I am finally getting around to A Presumption of Death, by Jill Paton Walsh, based on Dorothy L. Sayers.  In the first book, Thrones, Dominations, Paton Walsh had completed one of Sayers' own novels; in this one, she based it on some notes that Sayers had made for how she envisioned Lord Peter, Harriet, etc., during the years of WWII.  I also have the third, The Attenbury Emeralds, which I believe is based on a case mentioned in the Sayers novels, so I hope to go on to that one after this.


These sound really interesting!

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Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?


dulcinea3 wrote:

A Presumption of Death  

 

Finished Dark Threat, and enjoyed it very much!  BTW, the cover with the low-cut-dressed women had very little to do with the story - the two characters they may have represented would never have been dressed like that!

 

Now I am finally getting around to A Presumption of Death, by Jill Paton Walsh, based on Dorothy L. Sayers.  In the first book, Thrones, Dominations, Paton Walsh had completed one of Sayers' own novels; in this one, she based it on some notes that Sayers had made for how she envisioned Lord Peter, Harriet, etc., during the years of WWII.  I also have the third, The Attenbury Emeralds, which I believe is based on a case mentioned in the Sayers novels, so I hope to go on to that one after this.



dulcinea3, I hope you are enjoying those Lord Peter/Harriet Wimsey books. I know some purists don't count any of the Sayers books past Busman's Honeymoon, but I thought Jill Paton Walsh did an admirable job on completing the Sayers book, Thrones, Dominations. and I've gone on to read the continuing series with A Presumption of Death and The Attenbury Emeralds. Have you read any of Paton Walsh's other mystery books? She has, I believe, four Imogen Quy mystery books, and I think the most recent, The Bad Quarto, is a minor masterpiece. I highly recommend it, not only because of the Oxford setting, but because the plot line runs around a performance of "The Bad Quarto", also known as a somewhat earlier or even inferior, version of Shakespeare's Hamlet.

The Bad Quarto (Imogen Quy Series #4)  

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie
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dulcinea3
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Re: What are you reading right now?


Fricka wrote:

dulcinea3 wrote:

A Presumption of Death  

 

Finished Dark Threat, and enjoyed it very much!  BTW, the cover with the low-cut-dressed women had very little to do with the story - the two characters they may have represented would never have been dressed like that!

 

Now I am finally getting around to A Presumption of Death, by Jill Paton Walsh, based on Dorothy L. Sayers.  In the first book, Thrones, Dominations, Paton Walsh had completed one of Sayers' own novels; in this one, she based it on some notes that Sayers had made for how she envisioned Lord Peter, Harriet, etc., during the years of WWII.  I also have the third, The Attenbury Emeralds, which I believe is based on a case mentioned in the Sayers novels, so I hope to go on to that one after this.



dulcinea3, I hope you are enjoying those Lord Peter/Harriet Wimsey books. I know some purists don't count any of the Sayers books past Busman's Honeymoon, but I thought Jill Paton Walsh did an admirable job on completing the Sayers book, Thrones, Dominations. and I've gone on to read the continuing series with A Presumption of Death and The Attenbury Emeralds. Have you read any of Paton Walsh's other mystery books? She has, I believe, four Imogen Quy mystery books, and I think the most recent, The Bad Quarto, is a minor masterpiece. I highly recommend it, not only because of the Oxford setting, but because the plot line runs around a performance of "The Bad Quarto", also known as a somewhat earlier or even inferior, version of Shakespeare's Hamlet.

The Bad Quarto (Imogen Quy Series #4)  


I'm glad to hear you enjoyed the Paton Walsh Wimsey books, Fricka!  It's been a while since I read any of my Sayers mysteries, so if there's any difference in style, I wouldn't notice it, anyway.  So far (several chapters in) I'm enjoying it.  Harriet is at their country home with their two little sons, and Peter's sister's three children, to get out of London during the blitz.  Peter is doing some top-secret work abroad, but I'm hoping he will make an appearance eventually!

 

No, I haven't read any of her other books.  At the moment I'm trying to refrain from spending money, as I still am unemployed.  I've been very good this year - I believe I have only bought three books!  Two classics (Dickens' The Pickwick Papers and Gaskell's Ruth) and one mystery - the latest Death on Demand, Dead, White and Blue!  Luckily, I have lots and lots of TBR, so I have not been wanting for things to read!  I'm finally making a dent in all those Got Books!  So, Becke, you can feel good that you have contributed to my hunger for mystery at a time when I can't afford to buy them!

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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
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Fricka
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Re: What are you reading right now?

Sorry to read of your unemployment, dulcinea3. I myself am what might be called underemployed--I do work, but for fewer than 20 hours a week. The Learning Services Center, and indeed the Community College System here seems to have decided that no part-time employees will be allowed to work 20 hours lest the college be required to pay benefits!

In my case, I don't mind so much as I have my hands full with taking care of my aging parents besides working. Even part-time work does contribute to my Social Security, but of course working part time means I will need to work for a few more years than when I will be eligible to start receiving SS. Anyway, I do feel your pain, and have also decided that I must cut back on my book buying. I checked out the Paton Walsh books from the library. Libraries are generally very good about getting new mystery novels in, and I have my name at the top of the request list for the newest Agatha Raisin book from MC Beaton. I adore the books, but I'd be bankrupt if I had bought one of the new Beaton books every time one came out.

" A murder mystery is the normal recreation of the noble mind."--Sister Carol Anne O' Marie