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dasz
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎02-06-2008
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

Becke - thanks from me as well for that list of Nancy Drew books. My first book was (I think!) The Secret in the Old Attic--if that's the one with the tarantula and black window spider (you know that scared the daylights out of a 10 year old scaredy cat!) Gosh, I wish I had some of those old books. Nancy was my hero (hmmm...my first car was a light blue MG Midget and my hair was a much lighter blonde by then :smileyhappy:
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dasz
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Registered: ‎02-06-2008
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

Heh heh ... I just read my previous post. Of course I meant black widow spider. I was all wrapped up in my wonderful memories of a blue sports car.
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karinlib
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?


ms_linda wrote:
I was a huge Nancy Drew fan. My mom used to find the old books at thrift stores along with Beverly Grey, Judy Bolton and Dana Girls. A few years ago I collected the full series of Judy Bolton books and had such fun reading them. The old Nancy Drew books are very dated, it's kind of shocking now to read the language and racism that was accepted back then.

One book I remember buying from Scholastic through school was a mystery called "Jane Emily". That stands out as being very scary, I wonder how it would be reading it now?

Message Edited by ms_linda on 01-08-2008 07:14 PM

I think they reprinted the Jane-Emily book by Patricia Clapp (I loved that book too).  I must read that again.

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julestrik
Posts: 228
Registered: ‎08-28-2008
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I started reading the Nancy Drew series.  My brother had a few Hardy Boys and I read them also
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Circa
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-28-2008
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

The first mystery book I read was "The Red Room Ridle" by Scott Corbett. I then moved on to Trixie Beldon, Agatha Christie, and Phyllis Whitney.

 

I never was into Nancy Drew - I remember the Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew TV show - I didn't like it - that's probably why I never read Nancy Drew.

 

Circa 

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johanna49
Posts: 152
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

My first mystery books that I read were the Nancy Drew series. I was hooked. Now 50 years later I love mysteries
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LindaEducation
Posts: 240
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I cannot remember a time in my life that I didn't love a good mystery book! I inherited my older sister's Nancy Drew books. I also read Trixie Belden books and others.  Then I as a preteen I got hooked on Alfred Hitchcock

msyteries in paperback.  Instead of having my parents buy me candy or chocolates for valentines day or easter, I would request an Alfred Hitchcock mystery book.  I ended up with almost the whole series. Later I got hooked on Agatha Christie.  I will always love a good mystery!

 

 

You know you've read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend. -- Paul Sweeney
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becke_davis
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I still have some of the old Alfred Hitchcock books.  And the Twilight Zone short stories, too!
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TCovington
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Registered: ‎06-06-2008
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I love this question. I started with Encyclopedia Brown, and then as I got older I fell in love with Agatha Christie.
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DanJohnson212
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Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

When I was about 7 years old, I was a Navy brat, and my family lived on the Navy base on Guam. My mom did the weekly shopping at the base exchange every Saturday, and every week she brought me home a new Hardy Boys mystery and my sister got a new Nancy Drew book. I would get started on my book on Saturday afternoon and I would be done with it by Sunday night. Then, for want of something to read, I would sneak into my sister's room and liberate one of her Nancy Drews (had to sneak, because, as a boy, my friends would have teased me mercilessly!) to help me pass the time until next Saturday. I still have over 50 of the old HB books, and I revisit them from time to time as a pleasant reminder of a simpler time.

 

I was also a fan of the Bobbsey Twins and Alfred Hitchcock Presents The Three Investigators, and another series that I thoriughly enjoyed as a kid were the Brains Benton Mysteries. I haven't seen anyone else mention those here- does anyone else remember them? Brains and his buddy Jimmy (Brains referred to Jimmy as Operative Three for some reason- there were no Operatives One or Two) solved various mysteries.

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becke_davis
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I had Navy friends who lived on Guam, too.  Sounds like you had an interesting childhood!  Reading this thread, it just goes to show how the books you read as a child impact your adult reading habits.
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DanJohnson212
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Registered: ‎12-30-2007
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

That kind of upbringing has its good points and its bad ones. Although I met and became friends with many, many more people than I probably would have if I had led a more sedentary life when I was growing up, I never really got the privelege that many others have of making a life-long friend. You know, a kid or a group of kids that you meet in kindergarten, grow up and go all the way through school with and still keep in touch with. It seemed like I was always at the front of the classroom standing next to a teacher who was saying "Boys and girls, we have a new student..." As it turned out, when my dad retired from the service when I was in the 6th grade and we moved here to GA, there was one kid in my class that I wound up going to school with the rest of the way, and he and I became really good buddies. We went through the seventh grade at one school, then I moved and he just happened to also move into the same school district over the course of that summer. but when we graduated HE went into the Navy and we lost touch.

 

I think that may be one reason I became such an avid reader. Even though I kept leaving friends behind, I always had my books, and the recurring characters in them were like friends to me!

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becke_davis
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: What were the first mysteries that you read as a kid?

I can understand that feeling -- hard to believe now, but I was shy as a kid and I found so many great friends in books!  My dad was an Army brat and moved all over.  I've always thought it must be difficult living like that, especially (as you mentioned) always being the new kid on the block.