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Ya_Ya
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!

 


parKb5 wrote:

 

Obviously if they can lower the price to $9.99 in a heartbeat, they were not under orders of the publisher to set the price at $15.40. They just wanted to see what they could get away with charging.

 

Isn't this capitalism?  The seller prices his goods as high as the market will bear?  The market buys or doesn't buy (partially) based on price?  

 

(I'm not defending or attacking the $14.85 pricing of the book in the first place, just asking a question.)

AlanNJ
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!

As long as people are willing to pay the price there's absolutely no reason for publishers to lower those prices.

They're not in business to be nice or "do the right thing".  They're in business to make money.

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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!

 


AlanNJ wrote:

As long as people are willing to pay the price there's absolutely no reason for publishers to lower those prices.

They're not in business to be nice or "do the right thing".  They're in business to make money.


 

If that is the case, why not charge $18.99 for EVERY nookbook? Why not charge $500.00 for a nook? Then they can make MORE money. Heck, why give 40% off of hardcovers in their store? According to you, they are losing money with every sale.

 

Giving the example of the Dean Koontz book. B&N charged $15.00 for they ebook but the minute someone called them on it, they lowered the price to $9.99. That doesn't sound like the publishers pricing to me.

Eden
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Jflin
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!

Everyone has their fingers in the pie, BN most likely has a Minimum price that they are charged by the publisher

 

For a long time, a certain competitor was charging LESS than the minimum price (e.g. Sell for 9.99, pay publisher 11.99 or some other number).  This only works in the short term, eventually price must be >= cost, else you go out of business

 

For BN, (Or any other distributer), options include:

1.  Sell for exactly what the publisher gives the work to you for, living on "Other compesation" (e.g. Negotiated discounts at certain volumes (Sell over 100 price drops by 3%, you don't lower the price, end up making 3% on sales over 100), Discounts in other areas (We'll drop our price by 10% on hard cover sales for 3 months), and/or some type of "profit sharing" (Publisher PAYS for distributer to carry it's work), some type of price sharing deal (e.g. a certain company with a fruit logo, Sell for 0.99, they keep 1/3, and give you 2/3)

2.  Sell for less - Possibly getting some of the options in 1

3.  Sell for more - Pay publisher whatever price, and pocket the difference

 

There are lots of books on this type of thing, this is a VERY crude summary!

 

Of course, since this is the real world:

Very unlikely only 1 of the above is chosen

Different publishers Likely have different deals

Some things are special - e.g. Something like the "Harry Potter" craze likely will be re-negotiated for just that

 

So who loses?

Nobody - Everyone participating is their own agent, and the end result "Selling Price" is the real deal breaker - Too high, nobody buys the book, matters little how cheap it is for the publisher or for distributer

 

As long as each is being Reasonable, then system works

 

Note strong basis on the past, paper-book model.  Electronic has some different economies, but, frankly, the publishers are still in denial over this

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xamier
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

 


 

If that is the case, why not charge $18.99 for EVERY nookbook? Why not charge $500.00 for a nook? Then they can make MORE money.  

 .

 

Very simple, the market would not support charging $500 for a nook. It is unlikely the market would support 18.99 for every E book. An item is worth what a seller will accept and a buyer will pay. If the buyer won't pay the asking price, the seller won't make any money and will have to lower the price or go out of business.

 

Businesses are in business to make money. They are not nonprofit organizations providing a service. If enough people don't like paying 14.85 for E books the price will become lower or that particular e book will become unavailable.

 

I don't understand why some people seem to think that they are owed low price e books just because they want them.  As I said before, I will pay what the book is worth to me. If I pay more then you are willing to, that's my right and my decision. If you don't like it, try moving to a communist dictatorship where the government fixes all prices and determines what can be sold or even what you are allowed to see.

Xamier
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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

I'm not saying that anyone is owed a low price. But if a publisher only charges $8.99 for a paperback version of the book, the ebook should be at least offered for the same price.

 

I don't think that is an unreasonable request.

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xamier
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook.Give me a break!

 


parKb5 wrote:

I'm not saying that anyone is owed a low price. But if a publisher only charges $8.99 for a paperback version of the book, the eBook should be at least offered for the same price.

 

I don't think that is an unreasonable request.


It's not an unreasonable request, but you have to remember that some people will pay more to get an e book, I would, and there may be some cost to setting a DTB up for use as an e book.

 

 

It all comes back to what buyers are willing to pay. Some people feel that a DTB is worth more then an eBook, others feel that the eBook is worth more. Ultimately the market will decide.

 

:smileyvery-happy: 

Regardless of what people on the B&N forum think.

Xamier
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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

I hear from alot of sources that the publisher sets the minumun price for an ebook and B&N is not allowed to discount it further. But don't publishers do the same for physical books? I mean the price is printed right on the inside cover of a hardcover, yet B&N gives us 40% off the cover price. Heck, after a few months they throw the hardcover in the discount bin and sell it for $5.00. B&N is not losing money even when they sell the book for $5.00. That means that the publisher sells the book for probably a few bucks and B&N sells it for cover price or for whatever they want sell it for.

 

I'm not trying to be nasty or a "communist" as someone said, I'm just trying to understand why the same can't be done with ebooks. I can't imagine a publisher forcing a huge company like B&N to sell an ebook at a certain price. B&N could turn around and say they won't carry their ebook and then the publisher would be SOL. In a capitalist nation shouldn't the seller set the price of what they want to sell something for? It sounds more communist that the publisher is forcing a seller to set their price. If I buy a hardcover book for $15.00 and then want to turn around and sell it for $5.00 who is the publisher to tell me that I can't do that? If B&N pays for the right to carry an ebook, it sounds like a dictatorship that they are forced to sell it at a certain price and can't discount it if they want to.

Eden
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Doug_Pardee
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

[ Edited ]

parKb5 wrote:

 

I hear from alot of sources that the publisher sets the minumun price for an ebook and B&N is not allowed to discount it further. But don't publishers do the same for physical books?


No. Physical books are sold on a wholesale model. The publisher sells to B&N at a discount (around 50%) off of list price, then B&N sells them for whatever they want.

 

The Agency model e-books are sold on a consignment model. The customer buys the e-book directly from the publisher, with B&N acting as a sales agent and collecting a commission (reportedly 30%). As the seller, the publisher gets to set the price.

 

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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook.Give me a break!

 


xamier wrote:

 


parKb5 wrote:

I'm not saying that anyone is owed a low price. But if a publisher only charges $8.99 for a paperback version of the book, the eBook should be at least offered for the same price.

 

I don't think that is an unreasonable request.


It's not an unreasonable request, but you have to remember that some people will pay more to get an e book, I would, and there may be some cost to setting a DTB up for use as an e book.

 

 

It all comes back to what buyers are willing to pay. Some people feel that a DTB is worth more then an eBook, others feel that the eBook is worth more. Ultimately the market will decide.

 

:smileyvery-happy: 

Regardless of what people on the B&N forum think.


 

I work a crappy job LOL. So it often becomes a matter of what I can afford rather than what I am willing to pay. It killed to to purchase my nook (at the time it was $249.99) but I loved the fact that I could get new hardcovers for only $9.99! I wanted to read Under the Dome and in hardcover it was $25.00, even with a 40% discount, I still got the ebook cheaper! That was awesome and I was happy. Then all of a sudden the ebook prices got out of hand and now it sometimes costs more to buy an ebook than a DTB. I shelled out $250.00 to buy an ebook reader and I feel cheated when I have to turn around and buy a DTB b/c it costs less.

 

Now all I read on my nook are the freebies and the PubIt! books. I used to buy new releases like crazy when I first got my nook b/c they were all priced at $9.99, but now for the last few months I haven't bought anything.

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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

parKb5 wrote:

 

I hear from alot of sources that the publisher sets the minumun price for an ebook and B&N is not allowed to discount it further. But don't publishers do the same for physical books?


No. Physical books are sold on a wholesale model. The publisher sells to B&N at a discount (around 50%) off of list price, then B&N sells them for whatever they want.

 

The Agency model e-books are sold on a consignment model. The customer buys the e-book directly from the publisher, with B&N acting as a sales agent and collecting a commission (reportedly 30%). As the seller, the publisher gets to set the price.

 


 

Leave it to the resident ebook sage to clear things up for me. Thanks, Doug. I thought that B&N bought the ebook file from the publisher and then sold it to the consumer. What you said makes alot of sense now.

 

Thanks for clearing everything up.

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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

PS Doug, I see you have links posted on your signature without having the web address spelled out like in my signature. I wanted to post a link for my ebook in my signature but all that came up was the www. web page address.

 

How did you to that in your signature?

Eden
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Ya_Ya
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

 


parKb5 wrote:

 

Leave it to the resident ebook sage to clear things up for me. Thanks, Doug. I thought that B&N bought the ebook file from the publisher and then sold it to the consumer. What you said makes alot of sense now.

 

Thanks for clearing everything up.


 

It's worth noting that not all ebooks are priced using the Agency model.  That is why the price on this particular ebook was fluid and could be changed so quickly.  FOR THIS BOOK, B&N set the original $14.85 price and was able to set the new price of $6.29.  If it had been an Agency book, the price wouldn't have changed.  (Although Kindle wouldn't have been selling it for a different price than B&N in the first place.)

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bklvr896
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

 


parKb5 wrote:

I hear from alot of sources that the publisher sets the minumun price for an ebook and B&N is not allowed to discount it further. But don't publishers do the same for physical books? I mean the price is printed right on the inside cover of a hardcover, yet B&N gives us 40% off the cover price. Heck, after a few months they throw the hardcover in the discount bin and sell it for $5.00. B&N is not losing money even when they sell the book for $5.00. That means that the publisher sells the book for probably a few bucks and B&N sells it for cover price or for whatever they want sell it for.

 

I'm not trying to be nasty or a "communist" as someone said, I'm just trying to understand why the same can't be done with ebooks. I can't imagine a publisher forcing a huge company like B&N to sell an ebook at a certain price. B&N could turn around and say they won't carry their ebook and then the publisher would be SOL. In a capitalist nation shouldn't the seller set the price of what they want to sell something for? It sounds more communist that the publisher is forcing a seller to set their price. If I buy a hardcover book for $15.00 and then want to turn around and sell it for $5.00 who is the publisher to tell me that I can't do that? If B&N pays for the right to carry an ebook, it sounds like a dictatorship that they are forced to sell it at a certain price and can't discount it if they want to.


 

Hardcover books and eBooks are sold under different pricing models.  HC books are purchased by B&N and they determine the price and whether or not any discounts will apply.

 

eBooks from 5 of the 6 major publishers are sold under an "Agency" model, where the publisher is the seller and the retailer is only the agent facilitating the sale.  Under this model, the publisher determines the price and the retailer agent is not allowed to change the price or offer a discount.  They simply get a fee or commission for each book that's sold.

 

This is the way the current contracts work.  It's not a dictatorship because publishers aren't the government. The retailer has an option, offer the book and get a commission from the publisher or not offer the book for sale at all. 

 

If you search the boards for eBook pricing or agency model you'll find more discussions on this topic than you want to read.

 

But at this time, the bottom line is that you can either buy an Agency book at the price they set or not buy it.

 

As for the other publishers, yes B&N sets the price.  And as was previously pointed out, it's free market so B&N is going to price it where they think it will sell.  If they find out through consumers, that it is priced lower elsewhere then they can choose to lower the price to match.  But they're a business and they're going to charge, at least initially, what they think they can get.

 

I tend to think they initially use some formula to calculate the eBook price based on the corresponding DTB price or something along those lines.  You can see this if you search for a book called And Able by Lucy Monroe.  There are two copies, one is $4.47 (list price $5.59, save 20%) the other is $8.96, list price $11.20, save 20%.  Just my opinion on how they might get to a price.

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bklvr896
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

[ Edited ]

 


parKb5 wrote:

PS Doug, I see you have links posted on your signature without having the web address spelled out like in my signature. I wanted to post a link for my ebook in my signature but all that came up was the www. web page address.

 

How did you to that in your signature?


 

Not Doug, but you have to use HTML.

 

Example:  "<a target="blank" href="PUT YOUR LINK IN HERE IN QUOTES">PUT THE TEXT YOU WANT TO DISPLAY HERE</a>"  Also, do not use the outer Quotes, that's just so it doesn't show as a link here.

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parKb5
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

Thanks bklvr896, now my link looks official!

Eden
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook...Give me a break!

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Andromeda208
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!


parKb5 wrote:

 


Andromeda208 wrote:

The new Dean Koontz book What the Night Knows (pre order 12/28) is $9.99 on Amazon.  It was $15.40 (even more than the hard copy) on B&N.  I emailed them and 2 days later it was $9.99.  So if you email they do listen.  :smileyhappy:


But where do they get these prices to begin with? I mean, if they priced books in the stores like they do online, they would go out of business. B&N has been in the business for about 100 years. They know how to price books. If we the public have to e-mail them everytime we find a book cheaper, that is just pathetic.

 

 

Obviously if they can lower the price to $9.99 in a heartbeat, they were not under orders of the publisher to set the price at $15.40. They just wanted to see what they could get away with charging.


If the publisher sets the price at 9.99 and B&N was charging 15.40 I was not asking them to lower it. I was just pointing out that Amazon was charging 9.99.  That was the price set by the publisher, otherwise Amazon could not charge the lower price

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KD67
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook....give me a break!

Well as the original poster for this out of hand topic, I just want to say that I emailed B&N concerning the price of the original book in question (as I stated on pg 1 of this post).  I wanted the book and I was going to buy it, BUT as I told them I would have to take my business to Amazon if I was going to buy the ebook format because the price was set at 6.29  I had thought of buying the hardcover at 15.00 but was reluctant to do so when I could get it cheaper in the kindle format, I would just have to read it on my phone instead of my Nook.  I am VERY pleased that B&N lowered the price to match that of Amazon, and since they did in fact match the price I immediately logged into B&N and purchase the ebook. 

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BrandrewDM
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Re: 14.85 for a damn Nookbook..Give me a break!

The hard cover book is sold for $18 discount when it's first released. Understandable as there is that nice hard cover, pages usually have good quality paper and print. There is a process involved in printing and binding a book, price excepted. The paperback follows later with a heavy paper cover cheap paper and newspaper print. Still, book has gone through a process of print, binding, shipment and being physically sold by a human for a paycheck. This book sells for around $6-$8. An eBook is one file on a server, words in ones and zero's. The author is getting paid the same no matter what format it's sold. No physical book needs to be processed, delivered and sold. Who is making all the money? All the same people involved in printing the book only the middle man is making higher profits. B&N going to make that sale at around the same profit level to keep it's doors open for that hard book reader. Sounds like the OPEC of the Ebook market needs to go away.

 

Thought.... How about B&N become the Netflix of the Ebook. Rent the book as you can't do anything with the Ebook after you read it like sell at a yard sale, pass along to a friend, donate to a library or retirement home etc. do to DRM. I guess OPEC would have to make that discussion.