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Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


Ya_Ya wrote:

Two of those links clearly describe corrupted downloads or flawed ebooks; page counts in the descriptions wouldn't have solved the posters' issues.  Nor was their concern about the length of the books at all...  (The third mentions it, but never states that the 88 page length was a surprise; people do complain about the price of things they've bought, even though they bought them.)

 

Are you really attempting to claim that the only metric by which one can ascribe value to a story is its length?  I'll, personally,disagree with that.  I've read 1,000+ page novels that weren't very good and I wouldn't pay $4.99 for the "right" to own, but I've read 50 page short stories well worth that $4.99, or maybe even $7.99 or $8.99.  

 

Just because one isn't concerned with a book's length doesn't mean that one isn't concerned with what they bought, the quality of the story, or getting one's money's worth...   The metric by which said is determined just differs.

 

For you length matters.  Maybe for someone else it doesn't?  Are you incapable of understanding that  - or are you again being intentionally thick...

 

However, if you want to talk B&N incompetence and lack of QC, you get a gold star for unearthing those gems. 


You are missing the point -- perhaps deliberately.  The length of a book matters to most readers.  Apparently it does not matter to you.

 

Of course people complain about things they have purchased.  What does that have to do with anything at all?  If you were trying to make a point with this assertion, you failed.

 

The fact that you have paid more or less for different books means nothing whatsoever. 

 

The only solid metric available to us when we consider a book for purchase is it's approximate length.  We have not read it, yet, so we have little idea as to its quality.  Even if it was written by a popular author, we still might not find it appealing.  Even if others gave it good reviews, we still might not like it.  

 

One thing we try to do, however, is ensure that we are not getting "ripped off" when we make purchases.  We can look at a physical book and make a simple determination as to whether or not it might be worth the price being asked.  If a paperback book, for example, was priced at $14.95, and if we saw that it was less than 100 pages in length, we might be deterred from making a purchase.  I know that I would, and I believe that most consumers would, also.  

 

You really should stop the crude insults.  They are unbecoming and off the mark, making little sense -- informative to nobody.  

 

Iggy for you, Ya_Ya!  :smileymad: 

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keriflur
Posts: 6,833
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


deesy58 wrote:
The only solid metric available to us when we consider a book for purchase is it's approximate length.  We have not read it, yet, so we have little idea as to its quality.  Even if it was written by a popular author, we still might not find it appealing.  Even if others gave it good reviews, we still might not like it. 

For me, I have a long list of authors I love and I follow those authors on twitter and their blogs.  They're regularly recommending great books that they've read, and as I've had consistent results enjoying both their own books and the books they recommend, I trust that I'll like the new recs, assuming I like the flap copy.  In addition, I have book bloggers whose opinions I respect and they make recommendations too, and of course I have friends that are reading and recommending books to me.

 

I used to put all the recs on my to-read list, but now I'm seeing so many that I really only buy the books that have been recommended over and over again by people whose opinions I respect.  I guess it makes me fortunate that I have a "metric" that I can use to determine the quality of the books I buy before I buy them.

 

This is why I don't worry so much about length.  I usually know about how long a book is before I buy it.  I usually know quite a lot about the book, in fact.  But more than that, I know the odds are good I'll like reading it.  And if  I read it in one sitting (and I've been known to do this with 400 page novels), then I already have a stockpile of books to read as soon as I'm done.

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patgolfneb
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

It seems to me that a one page book is if not a download issue, is a possibility an intentional intent to deceive. After all any reasonable definition of a book starts with it being a lengthy piece. Descriptions like short story, novella or even short fiction capture writing not long enough for a book. I think it is reasonable to expect the seller to make you whole, and they can deal with the publisher. I would definitely contact my local consumer protection agency if they don't. Any boilerplate agreement is unenforceable if there is intent to deceive.
Nallia
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

I used to care about the length of a book, but not as a cost issue. I care because I rarely read short stories and prefer longer novels--over 60,000 words, preferably at least 80,000--and epics (over 100,000 words). This is because I read fast and don't like to leave a story too quickly. That isn't to say that there aren't hundreds of shorter novels and short stories that I've bought and enjoyed; I simply tend to enjoy longer novels more. Now I don't really care much or pay much attention except as a matter of curiosity. I am pretty well versed in the average length of the books in the genres I read, and I have yet to have an issue with the page count of any ebook I've bought.

That said, there are times when I do look for the page count of ebooks I'm thinking of buying out of habit. A small novel won't cause me not to purchase it, but I sometimes like to know beforehand so I have an idea of how much time it will take to read it. Much of the time I need to schedule reading into my day and I hate having to leave a book unfinished close to the end because I misjudged how much time it would take.

On those occasions, I pay no attention to the file size because it really doesn't tell me anything about the length of a book. It makes no difference if a book is a hardcover, a paperback, or sold by a different company. Word count is static in a book. Each story has as many words as it has, and that's that (unless it is a reprint with extra chapters, of course). Whether a story is a short story, a novellette, a novella, a novel, etc., is determined by the word count. Anyone who is curious can find information on he that is determined here: http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/wordcount.html

Because B&N doesn't include any real information about the length, I often have to rely on Goodreads or Amazon. Since I almost always have a tab open in my browser to Goodreads, I often just copy the ISBN and paste it into the Goodreads search bar. Goodreads doesn't show word count, but it will show page count if the information was made available. It will give me a general idea of how much time it will take to read, but also isn't very reliable since how long a single page is depends on the format the ebook is in. So I prefer to check on Amazon when I want real information about the length. Because Amazon will give me the word count.

It's something that only takes me an extra click or three and isn't that big a deal to me, but I do wish B&N would include length information in its ebook details. I would prefer that B&N include the word count in the details because that's what I prefer to use to judge book length, as it is a universal measure, but I would be satisfied with the page count. Yes, even though it often seems arbitrary.
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keriflur
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


patgolfneb wrote:
It seems to me that a one page book is if not a download issue, is a possibility an intentional intent to deceive. After all any reasonable definition of a book starts with it being a lengthy piece. Descriptions like short story, novella or even short fiction capture writing not long enough for a book. I think it is reasonable to expect the seller to make you whole, and they can deal with the publisher. I would definitely contact my local consumer protection agency if they don't. Any boilerplate agreement is unenforceable if there is intent to deceive.

I think in this case it was more of a tech issue - the pub obviously knew there was an issue, which is why the description states that the book is 31,000 words and that it equals out to approximately 100 pages.

 

I've seen enough published novellas and short stories to know that a lot of those are sold as "books", and this "book" was $2.99, so I don't think there's an intent to deceive here.

 

If this was referred to as a novel, or if the "pages" were really short so that they could report that there were 300 of them, then I would agree the pub was being deceitful.

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deesy58
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

[ Edited ]

keriflur wrote:

deesy58 wrote:
The only solid metric available to us when we consider a book for purchase is it's approximate length.  We have not read it, yet, so we have little idea as to its quality.  Even if it was written by a popular author, we still might not find it appealing.  Even if others gave it good reviews, we still might not like it. 

For me, I have a long list of authors I love and I follow those authors on twitter and their blogs.  They're regularly recommending great books that they've read, and as I've had consistent results enjoying both their own books and the books they recommend, I trust that I'll like the new recs, assuming I like the flap copy.  In addition, I have book bloggers whose opinions I respect and they make recommendations too, and of course I have friends that are reading and recommending books to me.

 

I used to put all the recs on my to-read list, but now I'm seeing so many that I really only buy the books that have been recommended over and over again by people whose opinions I respect.  I guess it makes me fortunate that I have a "metric" that I can use to determine the quality of the books I buy before I buy them.

 

This is why I don't worry so much about length.  I usually know about how long a book is before I buy it.  I usually know quite a lot about the book, in fact.  But more than that, I know the odds are good I'll like reading it.  And if  I read it in one sitting (and I've been known to do this with 400 page novels), then I already have a stockpile of books to read as soon as I'm done.


I do not disagree with you.  I have, however, been reading some authors' works for many years, and I can tell you that there is sometimes a great inconsistency in the quality of their writing. 

 

I have been keeping a private database of the books I have read for several years.  Before I received my Nook Tablet, I used to purchase my books from B&N in sufficient quantities to be able to take advantage of their free shipping policy.  Before I visited the Web site to peruse the available books, and to make my choices, I always consulted my database to see which authors I had enjoyed  in the past. 

 

What surprised me was the fact that the very same authors could write books that I deemed to be "outstanding" and others that I rated as "poor." 

 

Let's face it.  Creativity is difficult.  It takes a lot out of an author to produce a really high-quality creative work.  It shouldn't surprise us, then, that some authors are not able to produce such high-quality work on a consistent basis.  To some extent, we are gambling every time we purchase a book -- any book (even non-fiction).  The risk we take is lesser when we purchase books written by authors with whom we are familiar, and it is greater when we purchase books written by authors who are unknown to us, and for which few reviews have been written.  But the risk is always present.

 

I watch the talk shows that feature authors who have just released new books, and I often watch Book TV on CSPAN on the weekends.  Based on what I see and hear, I often purchase books from B&N -- frequently they are hardcover books.  Sometimes I am unpleasantly surprised.  The book turns out to be not at all what I expected.  In such cases, I gambled and lost.  I see no way to avoid such risk taking when purchasing any book of any kind from any vendor.  C'est la guerre!  :smileyindifferent:

 

One thing I was always able to avoid, however, was the risk of paying for a novel and receiving a short story.  That's just a plain deceptive business practice that e-book publishers and sellers are getting away with.  It needs to be stopped!  

 

Another poster commented that his NOOK was on a shelf gathering dust while book purchases were being made at a used book store.  That trend could continue and spread if publishers and booksellers don't halt their unethical behavior, IMO.   

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deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


Nallia wrote:
I used to care about the length of a book, but not as a cost issue. I care because I rarely read short stories and prefer longer novels--over 60,000 words, preferably at least 80,000--and epics (over 100,000 words). This is because I read fast and don't like to leave a story too quickly. That isn't to say that there aren't hundreds of shorter novels and short stories that I've bought and enjoyed; I simply tend to enjoy longer novels more. Now I don't really care much or pay much attention except as a matter of curiosity. I am pretty well versed in the average length of the books in the genres I read, and I have yet to have an issue with the page count of any ebook I've bought.

That said, there are times when I do look for the page count of ebooks I'm thinking of buying out of habit. A small novel won't cause me not to purchase it, but I sometimes like to know beforehand so I have an idea of how much time it will take to read it. Much of the time I need to schedule reading into my day and I hate having to leave a book unfinished close to the end because I misjudged how much time it would take.

On those occasions, I pay no attention to the file size because it really doesn't tell me anything about the length of a book. It makes no difference if a book is a hardcover, a paperback, or sold by a different company. Word count is static in a book. Each story has as many words as it has, and that's that (unless it is a reprint with extra chapters, of course). Whether a story is a short story, a novellette, a novella, a novel, etc., is determined by the word count. Anyone who is curious can find information on he that is determined here: http://www.fictionfactor.com/articles/wordcount.html

Because B&N doesn't include any real information about the length, I often have to rely on Goodreads or Amazon. Since I almost always have a tab open in my browser to Goodreads, I often just copy the ISBN and paste it into the Goodreads search bar. Goodreads doesn't show word count, but it will show page count if the information was made available. It will give me a general idea of how much time it will take to read, but also isn't very reliable since how long a single page is depends on the format the ebook is in. So I prefer to check on Amazon when I want real information about the length. Because Amazon will give me the word count.

It's something that only takes me an extra click or three and isn't that big a deal to me, but I do wish B&N would include length information in its ebook details. I would prefer that B&N include the word count in the details because that's what I prefer to use to judge book length, as it is a universal measure, but I would be satisfied with the page count. Yes, even though it often seems arbitrary.

Would you pay $1.99 for a product advertised as a "NOOK Book," but was only 26 pages long?

 

Just wondering. 

Nallia
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

[ Edited ]
If it was a story I REALLY wanted to read, sure. It would likely have to be by a favorite author, and would likely have to pertain to a beloved series, though.
Inspired Bibliophile
compulsivereaderTX
Posts: 1,119
Registered: ‎01-09-2010

Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


deesy58 wrote:

Ya_Ya wrote:

compulsivereaderTX wrote:

I respect what criteria others have for their purchases and luckily, there are enough books out there in varying lengths, quality and book length to meet just about every reading requirement that I can think of. I just ask for the same in return. And some information on book length. :smileyhappy:


I'm with you, sister.  And I actually agree that there should be at least approximate length info provided for all ebooks.  :smileyhappy:  People who don't care won't be affected by its inclusion and people who do will have the info they want.

 

My comment was directed at a post implying that if one didn't care exactly how long a particular ebook was, one didn't care what they were getting for their money.  :smileywink:


So tell us what is implied if one does not care about the length of a particular e-book regardless of the price paid for it.  Most consumers might consider such an attitude to be a bit irrational. 

 

If I visit a book store, and I intend to purchase a paperback novel, I can see immediately what I will receive for my money.  I can hold it in my hands.  I can heft it,  I can see how thick it is.  I can look at the page count.  I can tell the difference between a single short story and a novel.  I can make an informed decision as to the potential benefit I will receive for my money.  In short, I can behave like a typical consumer purchasing the goods that consumers purchase all the time in a free market.

 

If I attempt to purchase an e-book from an on-line source, and if there are no indications regarding the length of that book available from the seller, then I am buying "blind," so to speak.  I have no indications as to the "quality" of the book because I haven't read it, yet.  I have no indications as to the "quantity" of the book because neither the publisher nor the seller has elected to provide meaningful information to me regarding the length of the book.  Purchasing such a book becomes a "crap shoot."  The consumer must literally "gamble" when purchasing such a book.

 

Apparently, you feel lucky.  Good for you!  Have you thought about traveling to Las Vegas to exercise that good luck, or maybe you could just buy a bunch of lottery tickets?  The world's casinos love consumers who gamble.  I'm sure that you would be treated better in Vegas than at some bookseller's Web site. 

 

Me?  I prefer to know what I am getting before I spend my money.  :smileyindifferent:


Just because we have a hard time understanding the rational behind someone else's choices, that doesn't make them irrational. They might think the same of us.

 

I have two daughters. When I took them shopping for school, I always told them how much I had to spend on each of them. Whatever they chose had to last the school year. One of them always hit the sales rack, because she wanted LOTS of clothes, as many as she could squeeze out of a buck. The other always hit the trendy stores and chose fewer clothes that cost more because HER criteria was always "quality and label". It was their choice and one they had to live with.

 

They chose according to their own priorities, they were each delighted with what they got and I was a happy Mom because they stayed in my budget. :smileyhappy: They continue to make purchasing choices in the same manner today.

 

Neither is irrational. It's just who they are. I accept because the one who chose lots of clothes for the buck considers me cheap and a tight wad, and the other appreciates that I have nice things though she too thinks I'm cheap and a tight wad. :smileyhappy: I try to tell them I have nice things BECAUSE I'm cheap and a tight wad. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 

 

 

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deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


Nallia wrote:
If it was a story I REALLY wanted to read, sure. It would likely have to be by a favorite author, and would likely have to pertain to a beloved series, though.

I think you would be in an absolute minority of consumers.

 

In Marketing 101 we learned two important rules:

 

1.  Some people will buy anything.

 

2.  No matter what product you offer for sale, you will be able to sell at least one of them.

 

Experience has shown me that these two rules always hold.  :smileysurprised:

 

I am reminded that, a number of years ago, some people used to buy "pet rocks."  :smileytongue:

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


compulsivereaderTX wrote:

deesy58 wrote:

Ya_Ya wrote:

compulsivereaderTX wrote:

I respect what criteria others have for their purchases and luckily, there are enough books out there in varying lengths, quality and book length to meet just about every reading requirement that I can think of. I just ask for the same in return. And some information on book length. :smileyhappy:


I'm with you, sister.  And I actually agree that there should be at least approximate length info provided for all ebooks.  :smileyhappy:  People who don't care won't be affected by its inclusion and people who do will have the info they want.

 

My comment was directed at a post implying that if one didn't care exactly how long a particular ebook was, one didn't care what they were getting for their money.  :smileywink:


So tell us what is implied if one does not care about the length of a particular e-book regardless of the price paid for it.  Most consumers might consider such an attitude to be a bit irrational. 

 

If I visit a book store, and I intend to purchase a paperback novel, I can see immediately what I will receive for my money.  I can hold it in my hands.  I can heft it,  I can see how thick it is.  I can look at the page count.  I can tell the difference between a single short story and a novel.  I can make an informed decision as to the potential benefit I will receive for my money.  In short, I can behave like a typical consumer purchasing the goods that consumers purchase all the time in a free market.

 

If I attempt to purchase an e-book from an on-line source, and if there are no indications regarding the length of that book available from the seller, then I am buying "blind," so to speak.  I have no indications as to the "quality" of the book because I haven't read it, yet.  I have no indications as to the "quantity" of the book because neither the publisher nor the seller has elected to provide meaningful information to me regarding the length of the book.  Purchasing such a book becomes a "crap shoot."  The consumer must literally "gamble" when purchasing such a book.

 

Apparently, you feel lucky.  Good for you!  Have you thought about traveling to Las Vegas to exercise that good luck, or maybe you could just buy a bunch of lottery tickets?  The world's casinos love consumers who gamble.  I'm sure that you would be treated better in Vegas than at some bookseller's Web site. 

 

Me?  I prefer to know what I am getting before I spend my money.  :smileyindifferent:


Just because we have a hard time understanding the rational behind someone else's choices, that doesn't make them irrational. They might think the same of us.

 

I have two daughters. When I took them shopping for school, I always told them how much I had to spend on each of them. Whatever they chose had to last the school year. One of them always hit the sales rack, because she wanted LOTS of clothes, as many as she could squeeze out of a buck. The other always hit the trendy stores and chose fewer clothes that cost more because HER criteria was always "quality and label". It was their choice and one they had to live with.

 

They chose according to their own priorities, they were each delighted with what they got and I was a happy Mom because they stayed in my budget. :smileyhappy: They continue to make purchasing choices in the same manner today.

 

Neither is irrational. It's just who they are. I accept because the one who chose lots of clothes for the buck considers me cheap and a tight wad, and the other appreciates that I have nice things though she too thinks I'm cheap and a tight wad. :smileyhappy: I try to tell them I have nice things BECAUSE I'm cheap and a tight wad. :smileyhappy:

 

 


I'm sorry, but your anecdote is not analogous.  A closer analogy might be if your children purchased clothing (for whatever reasons) and brought it home (or purchased it from an Internet vendor with a Web site).  When the packages were opened, however, it was discovered that the jackets had only one arm, or the slacks had only one leg.  Perhaps a collar was missing, or a pocket.  What if the skirts were not hemmed and were cut unevenly?  (Keep in mind that I am, by no means, an expert on clothing.)

 

What you are describing in your anecdote is more nearly akin to readers choosing between expensive, hard-cover best sellers, and lower-priced paperbacks.  That is not the topic of this thread.  Everybody has preferences when it comes to content.  It is difficult to establish a preference, however, if the content is not to be found.  :smileyfrustrated:

Nallia
Posts: 4,758
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


deesy58 wrote:

Nallia wrote:
If it was a story I REALLY wanted to read, sure. It would likely have to be by a favorite author, and would likely have to pertain to a beloved series, though.

I think you would be in an absolute minority of consumers.

 

In Marketing 101 we learned two important rules:

 

1.  Some people will buy anything.

 

2.  No matter what product you offer for sale, you will be able to sell at least one of them.

 

Experience has shown me that these two rules always hold.  :smileysurprised:

 

I am reminded that, a number of years ago, some people used to buy "pet rocks."  :smileytongue:


Oh, I don't think I'm any different than anyone else. I think we all have our things we're a bit more particular about. I am a horrible impulse shopper and have bought plenty of unnecessary, nonsensical things. LOL I'm just more discriminating about my books. I don't even download the vast majority of Free Friday books. I think I've downloaded maybe five since Free Friday started and rarely download any other free books, though I do love a deal. I'm just not interested in books I know I have no desire to read. On the other side of that, I have been known to spend hundreds of dollars on an out of print book with qualms.
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deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


Nallia wrote:

deesy58 wrote:

Nallia wrote:
If it was a story I REALLY wanted to read, sure. It would likely have to be by a favorite author, and would likely have to pertain to a beloved series, though.

I think you would be in an absolute minority of consumers.

 

In Marketing 101 we learned two important rules:

 

1.  Some people will buy anything.

 

2.  No matter what product you offer for sale, you will be able to sell at least one of them.

 

Experience has shown me that these two rules always hold.  :smileysurprised:

 

I am reminded that, a number of years ago, some people used to buy "pet rocks."  :smileytongue:


Oh, I don't think I'm any different than anyone else. I think we all have our things we're a bit more particular about. I am a horrible impulse shopper and have bought plenty of unnecessary, nonsensical things. LOL I'm just more discriminating about my books. I don't even download the vast majority of Free Friday books. I think I've downloaded maybe five since Free Friday started and rarely download any other free books, though I do love a deal. I'm just not interested in books I know I have no desire to read. On the other side of that, I have been known to spend hundreds of dollars on an out of print book with qualms.

Well, we all have our preferences.  I, for example, would never pay that much for a book, although I have paid as much as $70 or $80 for a technical reference or a textbook (not available used).  Now that I own a NOOK, I hope never to purchase another DTB.  Over the years, I have given away thousands of them after I read them.  It became too expensive to keep them, boxing and moving them, then storing them.  My books were carted all over the US.  I think that e-books are a great invention, but I am upset that it is difficult to determine what I am getting when I purchase one.  It's not like buying DTBs at my local bookstore.  I wish that e-book publishers would become a little more ethical, but I guess that is a forlorn hope.

Inspired Bibliophile
compulsivereaderTX
Posts: 1,119
Registered: ‎01-09-2010

Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


I'm sorry, but your anecdote is not analogous.  A closer analogy might be if your children purchased clothing (for whatever reasons) and brought it home (or purchased it from an Internet vendor with a Web site).  When the packages were opened, however, it was discovered that the jackets had only one arm, or the slacks had only one leg.  Perhaps a collar was missing, or a pocket.  What if the skirts were not hemmed and were cut unevenly?  (Keep in mind that I am, by no means, an expert on clothing.)

 

What you are describing in your anecdote is more nearly akin to readers choosing between expensive, hard-cover best sellers, and lower-priced paperbacks.  That is not the topic of this thread.  Everybody has preferences when it comes to content.  It is difficult to establish a preference, however, if the content is not to be found.  :smileyfrustrated:


Really? because I AM the OP author and I can say with complete confidence, that the topic was NOT about purchasing someting and finding out it was damaged or short of pages later. The topic is that information that was important to me at that moment, was missing or incorrect and affected my purchase. There is a balance of quality and quantity that I look for and it just wasn't there. That bothered me on several levels which I didn't go into depth on, but apparrantly it also bothered  others who HAVE shared why.

 

I can tell you with all confidence that I had NO IDEA how many others felt as strongly about it though for many other reasons. The topic kind of veered off very quickly from what was going through MY mind when I posted and I did Not come in here telling people to get back on topic....because I felt that their concerns and how they felt about it WERE relevant, despite the fact that only some reflected my own concerns. It's all a reaction to the missing information and how it affects them or not, do they care or not...On topic as far as I can tell.

 

MY last comment was a reminder that the topic in question has varying importance and/or meaning to different people but that doesn't make anyone WRONG.

 

My opinion is not necessarily the correct one and neither is anyone elses. But I'm pretty sure I know what my original intent was in the OP.  I've learned how it affects others or doesn't affect them. It has new meaning for me now and I find that an excellant goal or result of topic discussions. I'm okay with that...Doesn't change my need for accurate information or my criteria for purchases, but I'm okay with others not needing it as long as their opinion doesn't make me feel inferior or stupid for needing it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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deesy58
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Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

[ Edited ]

compulsivereaderTX wrote:

I'm sorry, but your anecdote is not analogous.  A closer analogy might be if your children purchased clothing (for whatever reasons) and brought it home (or purchased it from an Internet vendor with a Web site).  When the packages were opened, however, it was discovered that the jackets had only one arm, or the slacks had only one leg.  Perhaps a collar was missing, or a pocket.  What if the skirts were not hemmed and were cut unevenly?  (Keep in mind that I am, by no means, an expert on clothing.)

 

What you are describing in your anecdote is more nearly akin to readers choosing between expensive, hard-cover best sellers, and lower-priced paperbacks.  That is not the topic of this thread.  Everybody has preferences when it comes to content.  It is difficult to establish a preference, however, if the content is not to be found.  :smileyfrustrated:


Really? because I AM the OP author and I can say with complete confidence, that the topic was NOT about purchasing someting and finding out it was damaged or short of pages later. The topic is that information that was important to me at that moment, was missing or incorrect and affected my purchase. There is a balance of quality and quantity that I look for and it just wasn't there. That bothered me on several levels which I didn't go into depth on, but apparrantly it also bothered  others who HAVE shared why.

 

I can tell you with all confidence that I had NO IDEA how many others felt as strongly about it though for many other reasons. The topic kind of veered off very quickly from what was going through MY mind when I posted and I did Not come in here telling people to get back on topic....because I felt that their concerns and how they felt about it WERE relevant, despite the fact that only some reflected my own concerns. It's all a reaction to the missing information and how it affects them or not, do they care or not...On topic as far as I can tell.

 

MY last comment was a reminder that the topic in question has varying importance and/or meaning to different people but that doesn't make anyone WRONG.

 

My opinion is not necessarily the correct one and neither is anyone elses. But I'm pretty sure I know what my original intent was in the OP.  I've learned how it affects others or doesn't affect them. It has new meaning for me now and I find that an excellant goal or result of topic discussions. I'm okay with that...Doesn't change my need for accurate information or my criteria for purchases, but I'm okay with others not needing it as long as their opinion doesn't make me feel inferior or stupid for needing it.

 

 


Oops.  I think the train just left the track.

 

You have quoted my post, then posted a reply that addresses something else completely.  My post was in reply to an anecdote about purchasing children's clothing, and how that anecdote was not analogous to missing or misstated content volume in an e-book. 

 

Here is the substance of your OP:

 

"This ebook has no description and is listed as having only ONE page for 2.99. I'm sure this is a misprint and hope for the authors sake that B&N fixes it." 

 

Tell me how, in any way, your words imply that some books might be better than other books for any reason.  The fact that you emphasized the word "ONE" tells us that you are not happy about the length of the book.  Are you now asserting that what you really meant is that you read the book, didn't like it, and want the authors and B&N to "fix" it?  That wouldn't seem at all logical, and it certainly wouldn't be feasible, so I don't believe that is what you were trying to say. 

 

All I did was point out that your analogy broke down.  It is clear that many e-book customers are struggling to determine "value received" when they set out to purchase an e-book.  This is because the page number information is not always available on the sellers' Web sites, or because pages are missing or blank.  Does it really matter exactly how the consumer is shortchanged if the value received is not commensurate with the price paid? 

 

This thread is now four pages long.  I did not see any confirmation from you that you actually purchased this book, or that it really did have only one page.  On page three of the thread, however, you did admit that "page count does matter to me."  Given the substance of the OP, and the words of the post that began with the quoted words in this paragraph, am I incorrect in assuming that this thread is about the quantity of an e-book (in pages), rather than the quality (well-written, descriptive, good dialog, well-edited, etc.)?

 

Look.  Let me try a different analogy.  What would you think if you took your family to a nice restaurant where the chef's special was offered for only $12.95 for a full meal.  Would you be upset to learn that your money only bought you a small garden salad?  An appetizer, but no main course?  I would. Most people would consider such a practice by a restaurant to be unethical and deceptive at best, and fraudulent at worst.

 

As consumers, we should not have to hire detectives and accountants (hyperbole, hyperbole) to determine how many pages we might find in the e-books we wish to purchase.  That would be just crazy, and I don't think any of us would go to such lengths.

 

My point is simple:  B&N should provide accurate page counts on all NOOK e-books sold on their Web site.  It is deceptive and misleading to provide false or no information regarding page count before a consumer is able to make a purchase decision.  That's it in a nutshell. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,833
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

How is it deceptive to provide no page count information?

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


keriflur wrote:

How is it deceptive to provide no page count information?


About as deceptive as not telling you how big the engine in your new SUV is.  As deceptive as not telling you how much cereal is in the box, or how much cola is in the can.

 

I think most consumers would know, intuitively, that withholding content information is deceptive. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,833
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?

In the immortal words of Inigo Montoya: "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
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Re: 2.99 ebook has only ONE page?


keriflur wrote:

In the immortal words of Inigo Montoya: "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."


Interesting that you choose to use a fictional character to support your position.

 

I know very well what "deceptive" means, and I know about "Consumer Fraud and Deceptive Business Practices" laws that are in force in most states.

 

So sorry that you do not seem to understand what "deceptive" means.  The dictionary and Wikipedia might be a better source of information than a work of fiction.  Had you thought of that? 

 

You might especially take note of the third of the five primary forms of deception to be found on the Wikipedia page at:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deception