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Frequent Contributor
ScrappersNook
Posts: 104
Registered: ‎01-11-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

 I can't imagine that Barnes and Noble would 'have to' discontinue their ebook program!!   There are plenty of people that will buy at any price....however, I myself will not buy any ebook that is priced over $9.99 - and that is only for something I really want.  The libraries have so much to offer that there will always be a place for the Nook...,which is exactly WHY I will stick with my nook...I just love it and love reading on it and love the looks of it...so sleek and stylish...comfy to hold, pretty to look at...fun to read on. 

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la_writer
Posts: 46
Registered: ‎12-24-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

In 1992, I purchased a old copy of Stephen King's Carrie for two dollars from a used bookstore.  Today, you too can own this book for the low, low price of $24.14!  Never mind that you probably can find a copy in any used bookstore, library, or garage sale in America.  If you buy it as an ebook from B&N, you'll pay much more, but - according to their website - you'll still save 25%.  I'm not a math major, but that doesn't add up.

 

I'm more than disappointed.  I'm angry.  I've had my nook since Jan. 27 so it's too late to return it.  I probably wouldn't return it anyway.  I love my nook.  I'll be checking out the selection on Kobo in addition to my local library. 

 

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Alley415
Posts: 708
Registered: ‎12-10-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


la_writer wrote:

In 1992, I purchased a old copy of Stephen King's Carrie for two dollars from a used bookstore.  Today, you too can own this book for the low, low price of $24.14!  Never mind that you probably can find a copy in any used bookstore, library, or garage sale in America.  If you buy it as an ebook from B&N, you'll pay much more, but - according to their website - you'll still save 25%.  I'm not a math major, but that doesn't add up.

 

I'm more than disappointed.  I'm angry.  I've had my nook since Jan. 27 so it's too late to return it.  I probably wouldn't return it anyway.  I love my nook.  I'll be checking out the selection on Kobo in addition to my local library. 

 


 

While I agree that the prices are increasing, anything by Stephen King is not a fair comparison.  It is already well know he favors Amazon Kindle.  Or, at least he has in the past as opposed to others like Sony. (Check out Ur)  I will also say that the pricing of King's books like Carrie were this way prior to nook's launch as well.  Maybe it was just a temporary decrease to see how good the sales were.  For example, I picked up Under the Dome for Kindle for $7.20 whereas I think the lowest B&N has been was $9.99.

 

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sub_rosa
Posts: 812
Registered: ‎12-25-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

Birth of Venus: A Novel by Dunant.
B&N $11.14, Amazon $9.99

Reading Lolita in Tehran by Nafisi.
B&N $11.14, Amazon $9.99

Wolf Hall by Mantel.
B&N $16.87, Amazon $9.99

The Red Tent by Diamant.
B&N N/A, Amazon $4.95

The Sum of All Men by Farland.
B&N N/A, Amazon $9.99

Jonthan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Clarke.
B&N N/A, Amazon $7.99


Don't buy from Random House, Macmillan, or Penguin until the agency model is COMPLETELY dead.
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DenisePW
Posts: 92
Registered: ‎01-28-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

Hmmm.  Was making a list for Costco this morning & thought, well, I don't need any books.  But:  that's exactly what B&N needs:  big box warehouses price competing!  That's was a significantly contributing factor in driving down best seller prices in hard cover & paperback.

 

So.....I like to see Sam's Club, & BJ's, & Costco & Walmart all get into the ebook business.  That might just shake everything up pricewise!

 

 

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Shrew
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎12-13-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

I don't think I would be as upset over the prices going up if some of the books weren't higher than hard covers.  If they can sell a paperback for less, there is no reason they can't sell an ebook for less.  I was looking around the web on this topic to see what I could learn.  I didn't really learn anything, but I did find an interesting article from the New York Times.  Maybe the publishers will realize that ebooks will turn out to be the same scenario as when paperbacks first came out, and there is money to be made with the lower prices.

 

Here's the section that caught my interest:

 

Another possibility is that the cheaper prices for e-books entice consumers to buy more titles. “If prices come down but the overall market is bigger, then we should be O.K.,” said Brian Murray, chief executive of HarperCollins Publishers. “But if prices come down and the market doesn’t grow, then we can’t make money.”

There is some precedent for that theory. When the smaller-format mass-market paperbacks that now populate airport bookstores and grocery checkout racks were introduced, publishers expressed fears that the lower-priced books might destroy the market for hardcovers. They didn’t. Instead, they expanded demand for books beyond elite readers.

Publishers and writers may hope that more readers are like Lina Albarella, a former book editor who said that in the 18 months since her husband bought her a Kindle, she has purchased close to 40 titles. While the $9.99 price is an attraction, she says she is more swayed by the instant gratification made possible by electronic books.

After buying the first in Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” series, Ms. Albarella finished it at 1 in the morning. She bought the next installment on her Kindle from her bedroom and began reading right away.  

 

 

~ Pam

~ Pam
http://smiling-raindrops.blogspot.com
Correspondent
crim_crazy622
Posts: 135
Registered: ‎12-27-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

I am a rather busy person and I didn't really notice when the prices went up.  Granted I haven't had a desire to buy any books in the last few days as I was fininishing up a book I already bought.  

 

I had several gift cards to use from bandn and when I discovered the prices went up, I went ahead and used them.  From my original prices, I should have been able to buy about 20 books however, I think the number came closer to 15.  

 

I am very dissapointed.  I'm a pretty loyal barnes and noble member.  If the prices are going to be just as expensive as regular books, then it would only be fair that we get discount for being a barnes and noble member at the least.  I'm still trying to figure out why it's more expensive to produce an e book than a regular book. 

 

The other problem I am having is the last book I started reading, has a lot of errors in it.  There is unnecessary spaces and incorrect verbs.  I'm rather upset that i spent that much money for books (and in the future even more money) for such careless mistakes.  

 

I think that even with the prices going up, I will start ordering from other websites that at least offer discounts for purchasing ebooks (like fictionwise etc).  

 

I also as I told my husband, think the prices will have to come down eventually.  As from what everyone has said, amazon is cheaper so people will start ordering kindles instead of nooks and barnes and nobles will lose customers.  

 

I just hope I have enough books loaded to get me through until the prices go down!

"I think the fact that we're all gonna' die is a pretty good reason to stop complaining." ~Dave Matthews ~
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alangerow
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎02-09-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


sub_rosa wrote:

B&N and Amazon charge the same for NYT bestsellers.  That's not the issue.  They are selling them for $9.99 and losing money on every sale.

 

The problem is that on the regular catalog books - outside the bestseller list - Amazon maintains a larger catalog at consistently lower prices.  Amazon is clearly the better company for eBooks right now.  If B&N cannot correct this imbalance, I think they will lose a lot of customers and eventually have no choice but to discontinue their eBook program.

 

I have about a half dozen books on my Nook right now.  I'll read all of them before I buy anything new.  And if it looks like B&N still hasn't fixed its pricing issues, then I'll sell my Nook on eBay and buy a Kindle.  Over time, I'll save enough money to justify whatever loss I take on my Nook sale.

 

There's a really great independent bookstore here in my area that sells very nice, clean used books.  The issues with eBook pricing is just too unsettled right now.

 


 

 

While Amazon may be a better eBook retailer, the Kindle as an eReading device is horribly restrictive. The nook allows books to be loaded from so many other places, in so many other formats, supporting more DRM schemes that you can bypass Barnes & Nobles bookstore entirely and have a robust library on your nook.

 

The Kindle is more restrictive, so users are more at the mercy of Amazon's pricing. Fortunately it's good, but they're more reliant that it remains so. At least nook users can flock away from Barnes & Noble as the prices get bad and find competitive prices with other sites or load free books from a variety of sources.

 

I have over 50 eBooks on my nook, and I've only purchased 3 through Barnes & Noble, and not one of them cost more than $5.

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alangerow
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎02-09-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

By the way, for people upset with Barnes & Nobles increase in prices, there are currently 951,747 FREE eBooks:

 

http://books.barnesandnoble.com/search/results.aspx?SRT=R&WRD=0.00&STORE=EBOOK&BOX=0.00&SZE=100

 

Grab some free stuff by some lesser known authors.

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sub_rosa
Posts: 812
Registered: ‎12-25-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

It appears that a moderator or some other B&N techno-type has consolidated several threads about B&N's higher eBook prices.  But after scrolling through 19 pages, I didn't find one message from a moderator or anyone from B&N attempting to address the concerns being raised.

 

This forum provides a great opportunity for B&N to communicate with its customers - many who invested in the Nook on blind faith alone.

 

So what's the story B&N?  We deserve better.

 


Don't buy from Random House, Macmillan, or Penguin until the agency model is COMPLETELY dead.
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Alley415
Posts: 708
Registered: ‎12-10-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


alangerow wrote:

 

The Kindle is more restrictive, so users are more at the mercy of Amazon's pricing. Fortunately it's good, but they're more reliant that it remains so. At least nook users can flock away from Barnes & Noble as the prices get bad and find competitive prices with other sites or load free books from a variety of sources.


 

Again, this is a huge misconception.  Kindle can read a variety of sources so owners are not limited to Amazon as so many seem to think.  They can use other sources just like the nook such as Fictionwise, WPL, and Gutenberg.  In addition, they have horizontal viewing which can be a huge plus for viewing PDF depending on the file.  A Kindle can even download direclty from other sources whereas the nook must be sideloaded.

 

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MusicmanGG
Posts: 324
Registered: ‎12-08-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

I just noticed that Shutter Island's price was dropped to $4.39....

 

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BN_Fan
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎12-11-2009
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Re: Wow, my eBook wish list just became a lot more expensive!

Toner wrote "I know this is obvious to most but it seems to have missed you."

 

 

If it was obvious to most how did you miss the point?

 

My regretting buying the Nook wasn't directed toward B&N although the way they handled the initial shipments was poorly managed and the initial software problems have been frustrating to deal with.

While I have several reasons to regret buying the Nook, the primary reason relative to the price of eBooks is: The reduced cost of eBooks $10 vs. $20+ seemed to justify buying a device that would pay for itself after the purchase of 20 to 30 books.  (I've had the device since about 12/17 and have purchased 12 books already.)

 

I guess what was obvious to me before buying the Nook is no longer valid.  Whether it's B&N or the Publishers is irrelevant.  It's one more reason to regret buying the Nook.

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alangerow
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


Alley415 wrote:

 


alangerow wrote:

 

The Kindle is more restrictive, so users are more at the mercy of Amazon's pricing. Fortunately it's good, but they're more reliant that it remains so. At least nook users can flock away from Barnes & Noble as the prices get bad and find competitive prices with other sites or load free books from a variety of sources.


 

Again, this is a huge misconception.  Kindle can read a variety of sources so owners are not limited to Amazon as so many seem to think.  They can use other sources just like the nook such as Fictionwise, WPL, and Gutenberg.  In addition, they have horizontal viewing which can be a huge plus for viewing PDF depending on the file.  A Kindle can even download direclty from other sources whereas the nook must be sideloaded.

 


 

 

It is my understanding the Kindle does not support Adobe DRM, which is the DRM many other eBook retailers as well as libraries use for their DRM. The Kindle may be able to load from DRM-free sources, but from what I've read it is not able to load eBooks from many sources that the nook can. The sources you listed all provide open DRM-free files. Can the Kindle load eBooks from the Overdrive library lending system?

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Alley415
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Registered: ‎12-10-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


alangerow wrote:

 

 

It is my understanding the Kindle does not support Adobe DRM, which is the DRM many other eBook retailers as well as libraries use for their DRM. The Kindle may be able to load from DRM-free sources, but from what I've read it is not able to load eBooks from many sources that the nook can. The sources you listed all provide open DRM-free files. Can the Kindle load eBooks from the Overdrive library lending system?


 

No it does not at this time.  I did not reference lending whcih is clearly not the same thing as buying a book.  As for as sources to buy from, few exclusively offer ePub at this time.  It is an assumption that more will go to it.  Until many outside sources do that both undercut Amazon prices as well and offer books that Amazon does not, there is no need to purchase from them.  Even now, many B&N books are pdb with DRM and not epub so they couldn't be used on other sources either.  Lending is also exclusive to the B&N software/nook.

 

Inspired Contributor
MrNook
Posts: 40
Registered: ‎12-15-2009

Re: Ebook Prices

[ Edited ]

Gosh, where to start on this diatribe?

 

Simply put this egregious price hike on thousands of eBooks of the past week or so is…


Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap! Crap!

 

Once again the idiots in the publishing industry appear to be out to kill eBooks and they will continue to screw authors over on the overall author commissions, and all while apparently happily pissing all over loyal customers.  What is with you people?  Who is giving you this advice or are you coming up on this on your own?  I guess I should now reluctantly throw the senior executives at Barnes & Noble into this pile of greed hounds as well.

 

I've bought just over 10 eBooks for my nook in the first month that I've owned my nook and I've already read half of them.  I was about to buy another slug of books from my overall reading list.  Previously 80% of that money for these books would have either gone to Half-Price Books, or stayed in my pocket while I sat in the library and the remaining 20% would have gone to Amazon or Barnes & Noble.  I average three to four books read per month and I’ve found myself reading more since I got the nook because it is so much more convenient and the text is cleaner and easier to read.  I love reading on the nook.


Why would, or should, I ever want to buy an eBook version of a book that costs only slightly less than the price of the original hardcover when I can only lend the eBook version just once in the entire lifetime of "ownership," and I can't donate it to a local library, or school, or some organization devoted to literacy, or sell it to a used book store or individual as I can with the physical version?  Even worse why should I buy any eBook that was originally published months or years ago or sometimes decades ago, for a significantly higher price than the original cover price, even in inflation adjusted dollars?


I thoroughly like the nook device itself and I've been pushing it on to friends, etc. even writing a review and talking points memo for my local Barnes & Noble store to share with fellow customers when the manager asked me if I were interested and I’ve been involved in eBooks as a customer and hobby technologist for years owning numerous devices over the years including the original, but now defunct Rocket eBook.  I’m no stranger to eBooks and have been waiting for 30 years for them to appear and hit a critical mass.  Some of us might now feel foolish for buying a nook.  I don't feel foolish for purchasing the nook, but I am certainly extremely disappointed and frankly angry on how the "industry" appears to be once again drowning the eBook “infant” in the bathtub.


Instead of buying the projected 40 to 50 eBooks I had planned for the year I will now buy less than 30% of that number which means I guess my purchases for the year are nearly over.  As long as this price hike stays in place I'm simply not going to give any money this year to Barnes & Noble and the publishers that would equal to the aggregate price of 40 to 50 of $8 to $12 dollar priced eBooks.  If the digital version of the book is more than $12.00 then I have no intent on buying it or a new physical version.  Just because I was expecting to spend $400 to $600 this year on eBooks doesn’t mean that Barnes & Noble and the publishers are still going to get anymore of that money while I only get half or a third of the number of books.  I'm simply going to contract what I'll call the nook "flu" and revert to my less friendly to publisher and author book consumption ways.


So, to Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and the publishers I ask you this.  Do you want to screw us over?  Fine, but remember that most of us on this board have a dog in this hunt just like you since we’ve spent money on these devices based on what you were selling us.  There is strength in numbers, and we have the ultimate weapon in any purchasing war; our money.  Revert back the prices on eBooks or watch your eBook sale transactions drop off a cliff for anything more than the $3.99 to $12.99 price point range where most fall in the $7.99 to $9.99 range.


I'm urging all of my fellow nook owners and eBook readers to cut back significantly on their Barnes & Noble, et al. eBook purchases until we get back what we were "baited" with that in part enticed us to fork over nearly $300 for these devices.  Further, every time you find an eBook priced in a ridiculous manner as compared to the physical version where you can find that version in a used book store or library please post this information on boards like this specifying what the book was and how much you paid, if anything.  I’ll add my own contributions now...


Total Recall by Gordon Bell now (Feb 21, 2010) costs $19.25 for the eBook at BN.com and I just paid $9.75 at Half-Price Books for the hardcover. Originally this was $9.99 for the eBook and I had it on my buy list for next month so the publisher and the author got none of my money.


Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done by Bossidy, Charan, and Burck now (Feb. 21, 2010) costs $20.25 for the eBook at BN.com when it was $9.99 just 30 days ago.  Who care if it’s a new printing from 2009, the discipline of execution in a modern business environment hasn’t change that much since the first publication several years ago.  The eBook price is more expensive than the first edition hardcover advertised on the same page at BN.com!  This is a fairly well known business book that I can check out at any worthwhile local library or pay $5.00 to $8.00 for an original copy at Half-Price Books.  I was planning on buying the book this week to have the eBook version as a portable reference.  Sorry, but that $9.99 will stay in my pocket now.


Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich now (Feb 21, 2010) costs $18.57 for the eBook at BN.com when on Dec. 17, 2009, when I put it in my eBook Wish List, cost $9.99.  The book has gotten mixed reviews anyway, but it still interests me and I plan on reading it.  I’ll go to the library instead.  I would have bought it for the convenience aspect of having it on my nook, but not for nearly twice the price.

 

I'm not going to pay such high prices for eBooks when I don't have the same flexibility of ownership as the physical versions and I believe that many of my fellow customers feel the same way about this.  Please spare me the sob story about how much is involved in publishing a book.  I know that it costs a lot of money to produce a book of any quality.  A quick read of the acknowledgments on any book demonstrates that it's not a two person effort, but don't claim to me that the printing costs and shipping costs and warehouse costs, etc. are less than 5% or 10% of the overall cost of the enterprise for the average book; especially for small presses and smaller print runs.  Physical printing costs are not that cheap no matter you would claim otherwise or you wouldn't dump the over prints of books into the market as "bargain" books or let companies like Half-Price Books in on the act, nor would you pay companies to store copies books in warehouses for months or years hoping and waiting for the demand to pick up for an author, subject, or genre that those stored books could fulfill.

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DenisePW
Posts: 92
Registered: ‎01-28-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

Amen!  I too will not pass the $12 price point.  That math you did....$400-$600 per year is what I did as well, in deciding whether the nook was for me.  I have no problem waiting a looooonnnnngggg time for a book from my library.  There are plenty of books I want to read. Simple as that. I will not pay $18-20 for an ebook.  No way at all. In fact I will have a grand time shopping wirelessly from BN for samples, & then use addall to find my best price.  After selecting my reading material, price will be my sole determinant. 

 

I also found the silence from the BN moderators deafening.  As it was pointed out, clearly they KNOW there are plenty of posts about the pricing. Interesting that they choose not to respond.  I am not fond of passive aggressive behavior in any form.

 

 

Distinguished Scribe
sub_rosa
Posts: 812
Registered: ‎12-25-2009
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Re: Ebook Prices

Price drop alert!

 

Yesterday I reported B&N's price for The Great Hunt by Robert Jordan to be $9.73.  Today, it is $7.99 - just like Amazon (and $2.50 cheaper than Kobo).  Guess what I bought?

 

Keep up the good work, B&N!

 


Don't buy from Random House, Macmillan, or Penguin until the agency model is COMPLETELY dead.
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alangerow
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎02-09-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

 
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alangerow
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎02-09-2010
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Re: Ebook Prices

 


Alley415 wrote:

 

 

No it does not at this time.  I did not reference lending whcih is clearly not the same thing as buying a book.  As for as sources to buy from, few exclusively offer ePub at this time.  It is an assumption that more will go to it.  Until many outside sources do that both undercut Amazon prices as well and offer books that Amazon does not, there is no need to purchase from them.  Even now, many B&N books are pdb with DRM and not epub so they couldn't be used on other sources either.  Lending is also exclusive to the B&N software/nook.

 


 

 

I was referencing the library because OverDrive uses ADE (Adobe Digital Editions), which the nook also supports. So, it was a clear example of a DRM scheme used by many sources that the nook supports that I did not believe the Kindle supported - so it was a means of confirmation more than anything.

 

My point is being locked to a single source for purchasing eBooks where the nook simply has more options because of its support for ADE (for both ePub and PDF), whereas the Kindle is much more limited and requires that Amazon continues to have the best prices. As long as Amazon maintains the lowest eBook prices, then the Kindle is a good investment, but if Amazon's prices are unsatisfactory then you can't take your Kindle and shop around other eBook stores.

 

If Barnes & Noble's prices continue to be high, then at least nook owners can look elsewhere because of the device's support for other DRM schemes and open formats. Kindle owners simply have less options. Not to say they don't have the best option currently available ... but there are less options.