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user4517
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

 
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very-simple
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

[ Edited ]

 


schatzieWI wrote:
What I find fascinating about this thread is that people will spend $xxx on an electronic reader and then complain about the price of books. Why didn't you keep the money, buy paperbacks or go to the library to get free reading material or use your computer to download and read the free e-books? If I had limited funds, I wouldn't have purchased a nook or nookcolor. I think the initial purchase of the nook is the big expenditure. My library consists of DTB'S, some decent free ebooks and ebooks I have purchased. I have donated all my paperbacks because that was the goal I had when I bought my nook. I also was able to get rid of several magazine subscriptions. Please, before you buy a nook, examine your reading habits, do a cost analysis and decide what is right for you.

 

This is a false comparison/equivalence/whatever you want to call it for many people.

 

First, I got my nook as a gift, so I didn't spend a dime on the device.  Second, due to having my nook, I've spent significantly less on books in general, because I am diligent about borrowing e-books from the library.  I could (in theory) have borrowed DTBs as well, but I didn't, because it required physically going to the library to both check out and return the book.  The bookstore was much closer.  For me, the nook was the most cost-effective solution for my reading jones.  Even if you counted the cost of the device.  I haven't spent more than $20 of my own money on books in over a year (I have spent a few gift cards that have been given to me, but that, and the library, have reduced my cash outlay for books to near zero).  

 

For the amount of money the books I have read in the past year would have cost me in dead-tree form, the cost of the nook (if I had even purchased it for myself) would have been a drop in the bucket.  You can see from my goodreads "read" shelf linked below that I have read a significant amount of recent, popular releases, many of which were otherwise only available in hardcover at the time I read them.  

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03FLHT2
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

I just had to say something about your gas analogy.  I also buy the High Test 93 in Easter US or only 92-91 as you go west for some strange reason.  My reason is I truly get better gas mileage and for the 2 to 4 dollars it doesn't pay to buy the cheap gas on a fill up.  Car runs better plus I travel a greater distant.

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JohnP51
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

 


03FLHT2 wrote:

I just had to say something about your gas analogy.  I also buy the High Test 93 in Easter US or only 92-91 as you go west for some strange reason.  My reason is I truly get better gas mileage and for the 2 to 4 dollars it doesn't pay to buy the cheap gas on a fill up.  Car runs better plus I travel a greater distant.


Another odd case is our's. My wife has a V6 Escape and I have a V8 Explorer. She gets better performance and mileage using high test while I get it with plain ol' regular. Go figure.

 

John

"Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else." ~ Mark Twain
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schatzieWI
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

Very-simple, I think your story helped make my point.
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shadowcat80
Posts: 2,356
Registered: ‎12-25-2010

Re: I will not buy any more eBooks


very-simple wrote:

 


schatzieWI wrote:
What I find fascinating about this thread is that people will spend $xxx on an electronic reader and then complain about the price of books. Why didn't you keep the money, buy paperbacks or go to the library to get free reading material or use your computer to download and read the free e-books? If I had limited funds, I wouldn't have purchased a nook or nookcolor. I think the initial purchase of the nook is the big expenditure. My library consists of DTB'S, some decent free ebooks and ebooks I have purchased. I have donated all my paperbacks because that was the goal I had when I bought my nook. I also was able to get rid of several magazine subscriptions. Please, before you buy a nook, examine your reading habits, do a cost analysis and decide what is right for you.

 

This is a false comparison/equivalence/whatever you want to call it for many people.

 

First, I got my nook as a gift, so I didn't spend a dime on the device.  Second, due to having my nook, I've spent significantly less on books in general, because I am diligent about borrowing e-books from the library.  I could (in theory) have borrowed DTBs as well, but I didn't, because it required physically going to the library to both check out and return the book.  The bookstore was much closer.  For me, the nook was the most cost-effective solution for my reading jones.  Even if you counted the cost of the device.  I haven't spent more than $20 of my own money on books in over a year (I have spent a few gift cards that have been given to me, but that, and the library, have reduced my cash outlay for books to near zero).  

 

For the amount of money the books I have read in the past year would have cost me in dead-tree form, the cost of the nook (if I had even purchased it for myself) would have been a drop in the bucket.  You can see from my goodreads "read" shelf linked below that I have read a significant amount of recent, popular releases, many of which were otherwise only available in hardcover at the time I read them.  


Actually cars are good comparrison because even though you didn't buy the nook just like I didn't to use your nook you need something to read on it.  Sure there are free books and libraries but, what happens when you get bored with what's limited to those sources, you start buying the "gas" of the e-reader, and if you really what your reader to run at its best you'll pay for the books you want.  You're kidding yourself if you think you won't.  Because, as another thread has been talking about on the nook general discussion people that have nook have trouble reading books after reading their nookbooks. 

Help me down the crooked road. Lead me to the light. I'm not sure I know the way but with you beside me, I'm certain we'll make it through.
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schatzieWI
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

Ebookexchange.com
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chesspain
Posts: 57
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

I really irks me to have to pay more than $1.99 for a decent loaf of bread.  But it's not like I go online and complain about it...oh, never mind.  :smileyhappy:

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schatzieWI
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

I can't believe a good loaf of bread costs almost $4.00. I started baking once a week, of course I had to buy a food processor, but no, my kids gave it to me, so I'm almost getting bread free, it takes my time, but after doing a COST ANALYSIS! , it makes sense to do it. :smileyhappy:
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frantastk
Posts: 743
Registered: ‎06-29-2010

Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

[ Edited ]

 


schatzieWI wrote:
I can't believe a good loaf of bread costs almost $4.00. I started baking once a week, of course I had to buy a food processor, but no, my kids gave it to me, so I'm almost getting bread free, it takes my time, but after doing a COST ANALYSIS! , it makes sense to do it. :smileyhappy:

 

$4? Man, I wish!!! I have to buy gluten free bread because my littlest is celiac and a good loaf of gluten free bread is in the $6-10 range. That is unless we want to eat sandwiches made out of bricks. I do make our bread but the ingredients to make a good loaf of gluten free bread doesn't make it out to be that much cheaper. We have one person out of 5 with celiac in this family and our grocery bill doubled just for her.

 

Oh, and back on topic, no we really couldn't afford for me to get a nook. But my husband bought it for my birthday and since I hadn't asked for anything in about 10 years he jumped at the chance of actually buying me a present I really wanted. I do buy the books I want but I save my pennies until I can afford it. I also did buy a bunch when I had birthday money from my mom. I unfortunately had to spend my Christmas money on a new netbook since our laptop died right after Christmas. Not like I don't have enough classics and freebies to tide me over until I can afford the book I really want. It's not instant gratification but I love it anyway. And I do use the library quite a bit as well.

 

Fran 

 

 

Edited because I suck at spelling. Spellcheck is my friend. Spellcheck is my friend. :smileyvery-happy:

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schatzieWI
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

Your husband is a peach!
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frantastk
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

 


schatzieWI wrote:
Your husband is a peach!

 

Oh, he's definitely a keeper!!

 

 

Fran

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very-simple
Posts: 1,262
Registered: ‎11-11-2009

Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

 


shadowcat80 wrote:

Actually cars are good comparrison because even though you didn't buy the nook just like I didn't to use your nook you need something to read on it.  Sure there are free books and libraries but, what happens when you get bored with what's limited to those sources, you start buying the "gas" of the e-reader, and if you really what your reader to run at its best you'll pay for the books you want.  You're kidding yourself if you think you won't.  Because, as another thread has been talking about on the nook general discussion people that have nook have trouble reading books after reading their nookbooks. 


 

But you speak about the library as if it's a static resource - that once I've finished reading all the books available (or that I want to read from the library) that I'll be forced to turn to paid sources.  But between the three libraries I belong to (New York, Brooklyn, and Boston), there's a good amount of new (as in new, popular releases) added almost every day.  And even for books from publishers who do not make their books available to libraries and that I would have to buy, the availability of even half the books I want to read from the library greatly offsets the overall cost of e-books to me.  

 

More detail on my buying habits (this gets lengthy, so feel free to skip!):

 

Since I received my nook in December 2009, I've read 41 books.  According to the price comparisons on goodreads, the current e-book price for all of these books together is $421.74.  If I were to buy all of these books in DTB form today, they would cost $455.99 (and that's a discount from what I would have actually spent, since many books were new release hardcovers when I read them, but are now available as paperbacks - I'm using the lower price because it still makes my larger point).  As I said in my prior message, you can click on the goodreads link below and see that many of the books I read were popular new releases at the time (both fiction and nonfiction), so would have been at the high end of the e-book price range.

 

I, however, have only paid $120 for books, because I borrowed well over half of these books from the library.  And of that $120, $100 was from gift cards I received - whether I would have even spent $120 without the gift cards is debatable (it's a lot easier to spend "free" money!).  As it stands now, of the 91 books on my to read/wishlist shelves, fully 51 are available from at least one of the libraries I belong to ("to read" are books that I either possess or have on "active" hold (since there are long wait times for some books).  "wishlist" are books that are just on my wishlist somewhere, but that I am not actively pursuing).  At the rate I read, this should take me about 2 years to get through.  And that's without accounting for the fact that additional books I may want to add to the list over the next 2 years will become available.

 

If you look at the overall cost to me spread out over all read books, I'm averaging under $3 per book.

 

This also doesn't count the hundreds of free classics I got during B&N's giveaway.  I may not read all of them, but I am currently re-reading Jane Eyre after seeing the movie last week.  

 

Of course, there may be a few books that I'm desperate to read that are not available from the library, and I'll buy them (I'm hoping Sarah Vowell's latest, being released this week) will end up at the library, but if it doesn't, it will definitely be bought), but that's only a handful.  

 

(and truth be told, I did some stuff for my brother while he was living in nepal, and he has promised me gift cards in return when he gets back to the states on April 1.  So I'm probably going to wait for that before I buy Vowell's latest).  

 

My methods take work and patience.  I used to be a total impulse book buyer, ending up with piles of unread books sitting on my floor, and I'm, in part, using the discipline of the library method to force myself to save money during my extended unemployment.  But it's saved me boatloads of cash, and it could save many others as well, if they're willing to put in a little effort and digital legwork (I find goodreads to be invaluable for helping me organize).  And at the end of the day, I don't feel "taken" for buying one or two books that might cost more than some remaindered DTB version, because I KNOW that I am saving significant sums in the long run.

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schatzieWI
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

Very-simple, it sounds like you are having fun doing this, too. I'm going to try some of your methods.
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very-simple
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

 


schatzieWI wrote:
Very-simple, it sounds like you are having fun doing this, too. I'm going to try some of your methods.

 

I am, it gives me something to organize, which I find I need.

 

When I first started (and before I discovered goodreads), I actually kept an excel spreadsheet of how much I was spending versus the list price and cheapest available DTB of the books I was getting.  I stopped when the amount of money I had saved actually exceeded the cost of the nook (proving, at least to myself, that the thing paid for itself).  Not that I bought my nook anyway, but just to prove the point...

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Elijah_Joon
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Registered: ‎03-21-2011
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Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

For what it's worth... my books are only 99 cents.

 

I'm shameless, I know.  Just saying... :smileywink:

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MattFL
Posts: 140
Registered: ‎09-08-2010

Re: I will not buy any more eBooks

Didn't read all the posts here, so maybe this has already been said.

 

The economics of e-books are still being worked out. It's going to take some time. 

 

When you buy a printed book, you pay for the work, the book itself, shipping, and the cost of  every copy shipped but not sold. With e-books, pretty much all costs are removed except those associated with the work. So you'd expect them to be cheaper. 

 

But there is no competition in the book market (there can't be, since all publishers have exclusive rights), and the agency model for e-books extends that to sellers. And everyone in the book business is hurting, so at least some of those savings are going to go to additional profit. And since the cost of John Sandford novels has no effect on the cost of Malcolm Gladwell's books, there is no race to the lowest price point. 

 

Right now we are all paying a premium, just like we did when CDs first came out. People are converting their libraries to electronic format, so demand is abnormally high and we all get charged for that. 

 

But -

 

We hear about the long tail, which is largely mythical, all the time. But with books it actually exists, just as it does with music. So at some point the ability to sell additional copies of books in a series or by a particular author at no additional cost will start to impact prices. It's possible to improve revenues and profits by lowering prices if it gets the buyer to make another purchase, but it takes time to figure out the right price points and that process won't even start until we have a more normal, stable market.